Paying for your own sub?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by blazer, May 11, 2019.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    May 14, 2019

    Awhile ago I read a Canadian's experience with their healthcare system. He was pretty open about it, admitting problems that can pop up here and there with respect to the different provinces and voting and budgets. Eye-opening wasn't the right word, because it wasn't so much pro or anti as just giving the experience and the facts.

    Again, I actually quite like the idea of socialized medicine in some form or another, mostly for boring, budgetary reasons (I'm already getting the money taken out of my paycheck sort of reasoning), but I realize it's not necessarily perfect.
     
  2. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    When I visit the US I am always entertained by your ad breaks on TV (well be honest the ads are better than the programmes) as 50% of them seem to be for pharmaceuticals. Friends have told me that when you visit your doctor you tell them what medicines you need whereas in the UK we accept the suggestions of the trained professionals. Thus med adverts are never seen in the UK. Plus in all your adverts the disclaimers at the end always say risk of death!
     
  3. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    May 14, 2019

    What I don’t understand is why anyone would want to pay upwards of 50% of their salary for healthcare that they will probably hardly ever use in the off chance that they need emergency care? How is a lifetime of diminished salary more cost-effective than paying for health insurance yourself through a private insurer? Is there something I’m missing?

    For example, I’ve read cases where people have to pay something along the lines of 47% of their income in taxes just to pay for socialized healthcare. For me, that comes out to $63,450 of my gross salary (starting next year). Now, if I pay that for 10 years (let’s pretend my salary stays fixed to keep the math simple) that comes out to $634,500 over 10 years.

    Now, let’s say I require a life-saving surgery that costs $75,000. I would rather pay $75,000 out of pocket, which I can easily do, than $634,500. Wouldn’t you?
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
  4. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    May 14, 2019

    I don’t tell my doctors what to prescribe. I’ve had them ask me specific questions, like if I’ve ever taken a particular medication or if one works better than a other, but other than that I don’t ask for a medicine.
     
  5. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    May 15, 2019

    In the UK we have a tax called 'National Insurance'. This is approx 6% of our income. It pays for our healthcare and also in part our social security. There may be some top up from other taxes. However what it means is that low income earners only pay a small amount of money, high earners pay more but everyone gets health care! If I need to see my doctor every week for 6 months then it costs me nothing above what I pay in taxes. When I cease working I shall no longer pay national insurance but will still receive healthcare (and a pension based on how many years I paid my NI contributions)
     
  6. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Which countries pay 50% of their salary for healthcare?
     
  7. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    May 15, 2019

  8. jadorelafrance

    jadorelafrance Cohort

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    May 15, 2019

    Some countries have a hybrid system (France) where everyone has national healthcare, but you can also obtain private insurance (through employers) and see private doctors if you want.
     
  9. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    But doesn't your system only pay for more basic treatments? I actually have no problem with your country's system, but I do know a few people in the UK who are cystic fibrosis parents who still have to pay for a lot of stuff out of pocket.
     
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  10. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    I'm not awate that CF sufferers have to pay. I have taught quite a few kids with permanent medical conditions such as CF and Diabetes and as far as I know their treatments and medications are covered. Kids under 18 get free medications. Over 18 and we pay a nominal charge (about 12 dollars) for a prescription if we are in employment.
     
  11. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Ha ha ha. 30 years ago my father's life saving surgery was 200K. Cancer - you are looking at well beyond. You develop a chronic condition, your costs can skyrocket well over 100K a year depending on your problem. Dialysis. Ugh.

    I'm not a fan of universal healthcare based on what my friends from up north tell me, but your costs are low.
     
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  12. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...-get-their-meds-so-they-re-moving-to-scotland
     
  13. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    But with copays, you can easily still pay. If your copay is like $10,000 or whatever and insurance covers the rest, that’s still really affordable.

    Also, if you have good health insurance, you’re covered. For example, my friend had to have serious heart surgery at Stanford and he only had to pay like $5,000 and his excellent healthcare plan covered the $245,000 remaining balance. Still affordable.
     
  14. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    My insurance dictates my treatment. My doctor prescribes something. Insurance denies. Doctor prescribes something else. Insurance denies. We repeat until insurance finally agrees that I can have a particular medicine.
     
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  15. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    May 16, 2019

    My understanding is a lot of the necessary things are free, but the people in my group tell me if they want extras or newer drugs of the very-nice-but-not-absolutely-necessary category (such as what @a2z linked) they have to find alternate methods. Again, I believe you when you say a lot is covered, but my experience talking to people says CF patients in the states have as standard a lot of things CF patients in the UK don't get to have.
     
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