Paying for your own sub?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by blazer, May 11, 2019.

  1. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 12, 2019

    This is what happens in my district- they deduct sub pay from teacher’s paycheck once sick days are depleted. I have 156 sick days on the books and would love to donate a few to a colleague in need but that’s not allowed.
     
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  2. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    May 12, 2019

    We are allowed to donate sick days as long as we don’t drop ours below 15. I have donated days to coworkers with terminally ill spouses, parents, or children. I haven’t donated in the past few years since my mom is sick.
     
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  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    May 12, 2019

    As I see it, their only complaint should be their union negotiated inability to have short term disability and long term disability policies. But if on average the teacher makes 82,000 a year, having to pay the sub at 200/day still give the teacher 50-60% of their pay which is on-par with most short term disability policies.

    As others have said, most times when you are out of personal and sick days, you get paid nothing for the day. Seems they have it better than most, especially since there is a sick bank they can pull from.
     
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  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    May 12, 2019

    Yep.
     
  5. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    May 12, 2019

    This is what my district did. First we had a sick leave bank you could use if you were in bad shape and out of days. We all would donate a day,. IF It ever emptied we donated another. The last few years the gave that up and then sent out an email asking for donations. I donated a long time cause I had so much. More to close colleagues........I liked the old bank better.
     
  6. miss_roxy

    miss_roxy Rookie

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    May 12, 2019

    I live in Canada and I've seen this happen.

    You don't just lose a day of salary, they actually deduct the maximum amount a sub COULD cost (tenured teacher with master's degree, say $420/day), even if the ACTUAL teacher who covers your class is a newbie making the lowest figure on the salary scale. So, if you are a beginning teacher and don't make nearly that much in a day, your actually losing more than just the money you would have made that day... they deduct more than your salary and then just pocket the difference and call it "administration costs".
     
  7. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    May 13, 2019

    I teach in a district just north of San Francisco, and yes, this is the "norm." I have a colleague who went over her sick time because her child had an autoimmune disease -- now she can't take time off when she is actually sick.

    And it's not just major illnesses -- pregnant teachers usually end up paying for subs, too, because our family leave policy is so pathetic.
     
  8. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    May 13, 2019

    Have you ever actually lived in a socialized health care country? I lived in France where as a part-time assistant teacher, all my health care was totally free, and I have a couple of health issues that require ongoing prescriptions.

    Also, I hear more about elderly people going from the US to Canada for their scripts, than the other way around...
     
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  9. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    May 13, 2019

    I've heard it both ways.

    Seriously, I have. In many ways I suppose it's a testament to personal options for needs and individual situations.

    In my daughter's case, insurance in the states tends to cover, at least partially, a very expensive medical device that is considered pretty standard. What I've learned is that the device is moderately rare in socialiized health countries where it simply cannot be covered by the government health plan. (it's an extremely useful device, but not, strictly speaking, absolutely necessary.) These parents are the ones usually digging into personal private insurance or holding fundraisers to pay for the device. Same goes for certain very-nice medication.

    My point being, it's not truthful to say socialized medicine will cover everything in every case.
     
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  10. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    May 13, 2019

    You would be the exception then because the data suggests otherwise:

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.ny...ld/europe/uk-national-health-service.amp.html

    https://www.npr.org/sections/parall...-the-british-love-their-universal-health-care

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.fo...to-curb-dems-enthusiasm-for-single-payer/amp/

    https://www.investors.com/politics/...ocialized-health-care-an-unmitigated-failure/

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.fo...lion-while-waiting-for-medical-treatment/amp/

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/health/is-canadian-health-care-as-great-as-we-like-to-think-1.3641544
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
  11. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    May 13, 2019

    This issue came up during my second year with "Teach for America." I was in an eastern North Carolina high school, following a year in south Texas. At orientation in the NC district, they told us there was no money available for field trips, but we were still allowed to take them as long as: 1. We paid for the sub. 2. We paid our own way on the trip. 3. We used one of our sick or personal days.

    Needless to say, the first words out of my mouth were, "Well, no field trips for my classes under those circumstances this year." One of my colleagues was horrified, "You can't deny your children a learning experience just because of those roadblocks." (I love how they invoke the adjective "children" when they're trying to play on sympathies) I replied to her, "Lady, the bottom line is that this is a job. No other school district is subject to these conditions. The least we can expect this school district to do is to conduct business in a normal manner, not rely on never-ending financial sacrifice by the teaching staff."
     
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  12. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    May 14, 2019

    That is an awesome response. Did she have a comeback to that?

    In such circumstances, I could possibly see myself hitting up some donations or grants, but never would it come out of my pocket and benefits.
     
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  13. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    May 14, 2019

    I have very occasionally taken a personal day for school-related business. For example, we had to return our costume rentals to a nearby city, and due to some weather delays this had to be done on a school day. My husband and I both took personal days so that we could stay the whole day and shop and eat and relax, as is our tradition when returning costumes.

    One day I took a personal day to go to a workshop that I really wanted to attend, but our school's (very generous) PD fund was almost completely exhausted, and I had already used funds that year for a different workshop.
     
  14. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    May 14, 2019

    No. She considered herself the "ultimate dedicated professional." I, on the other hand, was always more willing to draw a line in the sand. So, she more or less looked down her nose at someone who was more pragmatic.
     
  15. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    May 14, 2019

    Socialized health care can be as hit-or-miss as private healthcare except for the fact that there are few choices if there is no one in your country you can go to if your socialized health care isn't working for you.
     
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