Pausing

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by Christine3, May 24, 2007.

  1. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Yesterday, I was at a workshop on classroom management. Where I learned a new technique. The instructor said that when a student is talking, not cooperating or standing when not supposed to be, that you should just stop whatever your doing and pause until they comply.

    Do you use this technique in your classroom? Does it work?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Middle school here . I pause for about 5 sec. if the child does not comply I count to 10 if there is any sound from anyone I start over at one.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Yes. Sometimes it's combined with the "teacher stare."
     
  5. Teacher2Be2007

    Teacher2Be2007 Companion

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    I did an observation in a classroom yesterday (8th grade) and the teacher did this exact thing, took the kid about 2 seconds to realize she stopped because of him and it worked!
     
  6. Amers

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    I do this all the time. (also with the "teacher stare") It usually works.
     
  7. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    You'll find that some kids it works with, while others are just oblivious.
     
  8. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Yes, I noticed that today when I tried it out. lol One student shut her mouth when she noticed the awkward silence and then another was standing, he didn't catch on at all I had to say "Will you sit down?"
     
  9. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    All the time! The other kids sometimes will turn to them and say she's waiting for you to ___ :)
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Normally it doesn't even take that much, just a "Nick?????" and they'll catch on.
     
  11. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Yes! I heard that today...funny how some pick up to it and others just don't have a clue!!
     
  12. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Yeah, your right! I don't even know why I tried it with the student standing, he's not the type that complies right away. He needs to be told exactly what is wrong.
     
  13. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    It works much of them time for me, but there are some times when a pause (even paired with the teacher look) just isn't enough.
     
  14. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    I do the same with the teacher stare. It takes longer for them to notice it because there is no pause in noise. There is only a pause in me signing the lesson. So by staring, when other students notice they immediately start tapping each other to get that kid's attention. It takes longer but it is effective. If I have to do it again with the same student for the same behavior within the a relatively short period of time, then I move to asking them to move out of the circle some so that they can't have contact with others.
     
  15. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    I often pause when there are several students involved.

    I have found that it is not as effective as other cues for individual students, and it can actually backfire if the student is one who likes attention.
     
  16. Christine3

    Christine3 Cohort

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    Yes, the attention demanders would love to have the whole class staring at them. Thanks for bringing up that point. What cues do you use with students that crave negative attention?
     
  17. who me

    who me Rookie

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    While working with a reading group several years ago, I was getting nowhere with repeat reminders to the non-stop talker in my second grade classroom. I flipped to the back of my plan book where I had recorded the address and phone numbers of my students. I don't know where the idea came from that moment but I announced that if the child who had a phone number ending with 4321 didn't start working harder to follow classroom rules, I would be using that number real soon. I had trouble keeping a straight face when I saw the child's jaw dropped with recognition. It was amazing how that technique worked that day!
     
  18. eduk8r

    eduk8r Enthusiast

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    Yes. I do not ever attempt to continue giving instructions when misbehavior is happening. I've heard of "planned ignoring" before, but after a try or two I decided it doesn't work too well. The kid is misbehaving in order to get attention--it follows that the behavior will just escalate if ignored. And if some other classrooms I've been in are any example, my thinking is right.

    You don't give mean/hard looks, you just look at them gently and wait. It usually takes about 3 seconds for them to comply.
     
  19. nc4th

    nc4th Rookie

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    I use wait time as well. I look at a point in the back of the room and not at the student or students misbehaving. If they are still oblivious I just state that I am waiting. Most of the time someone will say "she's waiting" before I have a chance to. This seems to work with my class.
     
  20. Tbelle1035

    Tbelle1035 Cohort

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    The "pause and stare" technique usually works for me. Sometimes I may have to use the "Excuse me, please let me know when you are finished your conversation so i can continue" approach as well as the "Would you like to come up here and do my job while I sit in your seat and talk?" line.

    I work with younger students so i can't say how any of those things would work in middle school!
     
  21. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    You are right not at middle school.
    With my counting method I will get kids counting with me:rolleyes:
     
  22. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I use it when several students need to stop talking...it works. When lining up to go to lunch we must wait until we are silent before I open the door. They know this and my expectations, so usually it is a quick process. On days where all the kids seem to be in a more "spunky" mood I'll wait and the door but say nothing. If they don't get to zero in a few seconds I'll take a seat in a desk by the door, and that almost always works.
     
  23. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I use the pause technique with my ESE class. Invariably, at least one student will notice me pausing and tell the offender to get back on task. I usually only have to wait a few seconds. I also count down from three if it gets especially noisy. The students know if I get down to one, they will lose priveleges. When a new student is in the class and I use either technique someone will be quick to tell them not to let me get to "one" or to be quiet if I stop talking. I have learned to use these techniques because my voice doesn't carry across the room and I also prefer not to raise it. My students perform much better in a relatively quiet setting.
     
  24. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    If I have a student who craves negative attention, I make him/her my helper. They will hand out supplies, run a game, keep track of scores, or even be a peer tutor to a younger student. A little bit of that kind of attention goes a long way in diverting the unacceptable behavior.
     
  25. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

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    interesting - previous posters mentioned that it works for them when several students are talking, but not with individual students. For me, it is theexact opposite!
    If the whole class is focused on me, except one student, then that one student will notice if I stop speaking to "stare" at them until they refocus. However, if there are several students talking, I can never get their attention by just pausing - they never even notice!

    That's when I need to start using "the signal" or light taps on shoulders etc...
     
  26. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    When showing a Video this happens. I will pause the "tape" and it is sometimes 5 or more seconds before they notice the video is stopped.
     
  27. letsteach

    letsteach Comrade

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    I have a lot of ESL children who very easily switch off (especially those with zero English). My class is often their first experience of an educational setting and even pausing or staring does not always work as they are oblivious to the acceptable social conventions of group time, ie, teacher talks, students listen, teacher asks questions and students answer. My zero English students will actually turn their back to me to continue their conversation to their friend! I have a hand pointer which means I can generally reach them, tap them on the shoulder to indicate turn round, finger to my lip (shhh), and pull my ear (listen)!

    Some advice that I saw regarding getting compliance (and this was for high school children) was to use the broken record technique. For example, if a student is swinging on their chair, you request them to "Sit nicely on your chair". If the student protests, "Awe, Miss, there's nothing wrong with doing this?". You repeat your request, "Sit nicely on your chair", "but I'm comfortable like this Miss", repeat again, "Sit nicely on your chair". The theory behind the broken record technique is not to engage in an exchange with the student and not to be confrontational. I have used it and it has worked, however, I've never been in a situation where the student has refused to comply. If I this were to happen, I would then give the student 2 choices, one to do as requested and the other would be to give them a consequence of their non-compliance. The responsiblity of decision making is now theirs.
     
  28. Tbelle1035

    Tbelle1035 Cohort

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    I agree with your last technique. It's especially effective when the students want to get going. All I have to do is sit at my desk and start working. They're like, Hey I thought we were going to lunch??? Then they straighten out PDQ.

    Aren't we clever?;)
     
  29. myangel52

    myangel52 Comrade

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    I have actually had a student come up and try to teach the other students how to solve a problem (I teach math, 6th grade) because he thought it would be easy -- he is a constant joker/talker. I had all the other students act like him for a few minutes, so that he would get the idea of how hard it can be to show them how to do things.... What a funny 10 minutes. After the first few, he really got the point. It has helped, some. (Not as much as I would have liked, but......) :)
     

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