Parents want to know

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by teacherR, May 27, 2011.

  1. teacherR

    teacherR Companion

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    May 27, 2011

    As the school year is coming to an end parents have been filling out parent questionnaires and the one thing they all say is that they would like us to communicate how thier child is doing in the program better. How do you communicate student progress with your parents and how often? We dont want to do anything to time consuming because we are a small school. Do you send home a weekly or monthly note with each student?
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    May 27, 2011

    Could you have a list of goals that students are supposed to master each month (or season) and update these weekly for the parents?
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 27, 2011

    I send home all graded student work in a Friday Folder each week. Parents are supposed to sign off that they reviewed the work on a sheet that remains in the folder, families keep the work. No one can say that they weren't aware of how their child was doing since they sign off on the graded work each week.
     
  5. mrgrinch09

    mrgrinch09 Comrade

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    May 27, 2011

    We have parent conferences twice a year. We will do additional parent conferences if they are requested or needed.

    The parents have my e-mail address so they can contact me with any questions, suggestions, or concerns.

    Most of the parent/teacher dialogue goes on at drop off and pick up time. Little conversations that happen every day pretty much keep them informed about how their child is doing.
     
  6. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

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    May 27, 2011

    When I was in a preschool room, we would take pictures of the activities throughout the day, and then type up a little one page "log" with quotes from the kids, pictures, and info about our day. We would hang up a week's worth at a time, and then transfer them into a binder. If was a good way to keep parents informed, and help start conversations at drop off/ pick up
     
  7. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    May 27, 2011

    Well, when I was in kindergarten, I sent home a fun-simple weekly homework packet with a weekly note on the very front. On top I wrote a quick update on what we've been working on, upcoming events, maybe a picture of what happened in our classroom, and so on. Then on the bottom I included several lines for parents to write on if they had any concerns, suggestions, notes, anything. And on the very bottom they had to sign off that they helped with the homework. I received lots of compliments AND it was pretty easy to quickly type up and print out.
     
  8. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    May 27, 2011

    Graded work for preschool?
     
  9. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    May 28, 2011

    I send home weekly newsletters with stories from the classroom. This year we also did a monthly one on top of that. This was a grade level newsletter that focused on upcoming curriculum standards we would be meeting that month as well as important dates.

    I also make it a point to email each parent something cute, an anecdote, or an observation of some kind once a week or once every two weeks (min). Sometimes I do it more! I do it often enough that it isn't something that I feel I have to force. When I see something I think a parent would appreciate hearing, I send it. If there is a child I haven't sent something for awhile (over a week), I might have to observe that child a little more. That's an important part of teaching anyways. So when I send something negative or a concern of any kind, I find that parents are more enthusiastic about helping. I start to get a lot more fun communication from home as well. It really is a way to build a rapport with parents. I also find this additional communication from parents tends to be more positive, provides much needed support and some of the things I hear from them provide valuable insight that impacts how I might approach something in my classroom. The content in the emails vary. It can be behavioral, something that was said, or academic related.

    Occasionally I might get a parent that doesn't read as much or respond to things but I find the emails are read more than the newsletter and that parents in general like the positive communication and it tells them that THEIR child is valued.

    My newsletters can be a bit wordy and I understand if parents don't read them all the way but the emails are very short and very specific to their child and I believe most parents will take the time to read these.

    I personally find these emails to lift my spirits. Sure there are days when I sit down and don't want to start but every single time I do, I find myself smiling. It's well worth it.
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 28, 2011

    Sorry..I'm in grade 3.:woot:
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    May 28, 2011

    Perhaps you could ask each for their email address. Then, once a week or so, you could drop a brief sentence or two.

    Again, I don't know your class sizes. For my 5 math classes of 35-40, plus 5 SAT prep classes the same size, this would NOT be manageable. Yet I've had a running dialog with 5 or 6 parents this year, most of my kids who are really struggling. They're incredibly thankful that I've been so attentive to it, and it really has required very little effort on my part.
     
  12. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    May 28, 2011

    This is pretty much our plan as well. We have the binder, the pickup drop off conversations, a calendar with newsletter on it that goes out each month. The parents are invited to come in and "help" when the can and want to and are actually welcomed when they do, and the surveys that you speak of go out 3x a year.
     
  13. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    May 28, 2011

    Whew....I was worried there for awhile. ;)
     
  14. dibba

    dibba Rookie

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    May 29, 2011

    We have a folder we send home with the child with what they're learning.

    Also, we have a wall where we hang the current activity the kids made, and at the end of the week we send it home with them.

    This gives parents something to hang on the fridge, and de-clutters the preschool and makes it ready for the next activity to show off.
     
  15. teacherR

    teacherR Companion

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    Jun 7, 2011

    So many good ideas!! Thanks. I have been sending out a weekly email letting parents know what we have been working on but they seem to want to know about their individual child. I think that I will try taking pictures and making a log for parents to see.
     

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