Parents and CGI

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by divey, Jul 17, 2014.

  1. divey

    divey Companion

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    Jul 17, 2014

    I attended professional development on Cognitively Guided Instruction last week, and am looking forward to implementing it in my classroom this school year. I would like to provide parents some information on CGI to introduce them to what I'm doing, as well as how they can support this type of learning at home, but have not been able to find something that I really like in my searches. Do any of you have a parent letter or resource that you have used?
     
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  3. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Jul 17, 2014

    Not being sure what it was myself, I looked it up and saw this on Iowa's DOE site:

    If I saw something like this as a statement, I'd be curious as to what exactly it involved, and be particularly wary that students might not learn simple arithmetic skills (for some reason, the US is particularly poor at teaching basic math).

    I've italicized what seems like a fluff statement to me above, and bolded what seems interesting. On the last one, I'd need to see some examples (in fact, an example or two would be great to have at BTS night if there's time -- the school my kids go to is remarkably brisk when it comes to BTS).
     
  4. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Jul 17, 2014

    "Assess students’ thinking and design problems that will develop students’ understanding of concepts and skills."

    "Facilitate discussions that provide a window into children’s thinking, strengthen children’s ability to reason about arithmetic, and build their capacity for algebraic reasoning."

    To me there is no fluff in these statements, it is the core and substance. It is looking at where a student is mathematically with a concept or skill and designing very specific problems to move that child's thinking forward.

    Too many teachers, imo, look more at the next standard they think they need to teach instead of where that particular child is and what they will need before getting to that next standard.

    Those statement are all about knowing each individual students mathematical thinking.


    Here are a few true-false open examples.
    55-g=54-2
    254+36 = 255+37
    3/4 x1 = 3/4 x 7/7
     
  5. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Jul 17, 2014

    Perhaps to you there is no fluff there; to me they seem vague and lacking specifics. If the post is about presentation to parents, then I think more will be on the side of needing convincing that they're not fluff statements.

    I fully agree with you that looking at where a student is mathematically is important. I also agree that designing very specific problems to move the child's thinking forward is great. However, just because someone can say those words doesn't convince me they can actually do it, without describing the techniques or methods, or examples of what they will do/have done.

    You might not have time to really do that with parents, and that's okay. In that case you can:

    1. Deliver the vague statements, acknowledge that they sound vague,( and assure them that there are really a lot of details behind it and indicate you can give them out over email or in a separate individual presentation if they like (if over email, you can probably point them to scads of documentation without actually creating it all yourself))
    2. Only deliver the solid statements
    3. Deliver the vague statements and substantiate them with some examples

    I put the part about offering them the details if they want them in parentheses because maybe you don't want to explicitly offer them. Maybe instead you want to encourage them to wait and see the results.

    A fluff statement isn't necessarily a bad thing if it indicates a spirit or an overall aim. Personally, though, the actual practice is something that would interest me more.
     
  6. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Jul 17, 2014

    Ah, I see what your are saying, yeah most everything in that case is fluff. Even giving rock solid examples means little if you can't pull it off with a class of actual students.
     

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