Parent signatures...

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by IAMME, Oct 7, 2009.

  1. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    Oct 7, 2009

    Hi everyone, I am not a teacher, I am a parent with a comment/concern.

    I have three children 9th grade, 6th grade, and 2nd grade. Both of my younger children are sent home with multiple notes I must sign every single day...Homework folders, speech folders, reading folders, tests, science folders, vocab and spelling, and behaviour charts and then all the additional permission slips ect. I help with homework when asked, and I make sure my youngsters read (the older two are more often in trouble at school for reading too much, like when they should be listening) but with the older two and increasingly with the younger one, I feel schoolwork is THEIR responsibility.

    A girlfriend and I were out to lunch today and she got a call from her 1st grader's teacher wanting to know why his reading folder had not been signed in three days (they are in the middle of moving), the tone was accusational and it prompted us to discuss how we feel about all these things we are supposed to sign every day, when we were children getting a parent's signature was one of two things; either a permission slip OR you were in trouble.

    Now I definately want to know if my child isn't turning in work, or is falling behind, or is misbehaving (if that behaviour is serious enough that you feel the child should be punished at home.) But otherwise I feel that all of these notes home are actually counter-productive, my friend and I both admitted that we dont even read what we are signing at this point, which is sad, when the teachers are going to such extremes to get us involved, and we both feel more and more annoyed and driven away.

    I don't know that I have a real question here, but any comments would be welcomed. TIA.
     
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  3. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Oct 7, 2009

    I am both a parent and a teacher. Because I teach seventh grade, I very rarely have things that go home to be signed. I have a third grader, and I am supposed to sign her assignment notebook every night as well as her practice sheet for her violin lessons (through school; part of her orchestra grade). Last year, in addition to signing off on her homework, I also had to remember to sign her reading log. It bothers me when she gets penalized because I forgot to sign.
     
  4. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Hmmm, I'm not sure what you expect to get from a website devoted to teachers. Considering as it's your first post, you might find some less than enthusiastic to respond (some people engage in "drive-by" posting, where they post a comment but never return to follow up).

    I'm a parent also. To be honest, I am a bit surprised you're finding the work of signing these things overwhelming -- I've always found ensuring they're actually doing them more difficult than just scribbling down my name.

    Apparently the teacher is making the effort to check and monitor these things every day, which I think is wonderful. Teachers sometimes complain about helicopter parents, but the reverse is pretty uncommon. I have plenty of complaints about teachers, both general and specific, but never that the teacher's kept up with organization or has stuck too closely to their stated policies.

    I'd also add that personally I feel that while it's the teacher's job to teach, the parent has to be actively involved in ensuring their children get a proper education. This means I review all my kids' homework personally for correctness, because I know teachers often just check for completion (and it's better to get feedback more quickly anyway). I pre-test them before spelling and vocabulary tests. And we make sure they do the nightly homework every night.

    If I were you, though, I might consider suggesting to the teachers that they consolidate the signatures onto a single page rather than sending multiple notes. It would save paper, anyway.

    ETA: but yes, I don't think the student should be penalized for the parent forgetting to sign.
     
  5. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I wish parents who didn't read what they are signing would simply not provide a signature. And that's sincerely not intended to be rude...it's the truth. It creates a communication breakdown. :(

    While I do think it may be excessive to have folders for each subject needing a signature, I think asking a first grader's parent to sign an overall agenda, a reading log, and a behavior chart is reasonable. I also think it would be wonderful to be able to have my sixth graders' parents sign their agendas each night so they would be aware of what's going on in class and of any special announcements or notes placed in the agenda, but too many of parents also just sign without reading.
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I think they should have weekly or bi-weekly signing of stuff (like wednesday and friday or something)

    But for children who are forgetful, they should have daily signings. It's what the resource room teachers do here
     
  7. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    Exactly Mrs. R, my daughters have to pull cards if their stuff is not signed. I am a single mom with a business, all of my kids are in extracurricular activities, sometimes my son who is 14 is in charge of helping his sisters, sometimes he is the babysitter and the girls are already in bed when I get home, sometimes having him check their homework is my only option.

    I have never had a problem getting them to DO any of their work, now getting them to actually get it back to the teacher is a whole nother ballgame...I guess I just dont see the point in seeing what they wrote down as their homework assignment every single day in every single class unless of course they need help, I dont have a problem having them write it down to promote organization but unless there is a problem then I don't see the point of signing it everyday, and I would rather talk to my kids about what they did at school than read it.
     
  8. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Having students write down their assigments obviously helps them, but it should help you in talking to them about their day. You said you want to talk to your child about his or her day opposed to read about it, but it's not an either/or situation. You can have the agenda in front on you and say, "Oh, I see you did an activity today in science about clouds. Can you tell me more about that?" Your signature lets the teacher know you are supporting school at home, among other things...and it lets your child see that you are involved and care about their education.
     
  9. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

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    Just keep in mind that your child is not the only one in the classroom. Many of the children probably do need their parents to sign things because they are not as good as you kids about doing work. It would be really hard for me to remember who doesn't need things signed and who does so it is much easier for them all to get the things signed.

    Also, for reading logs I get really upset when the parents just sign it without looking at it. When they do that the kids tend to lie about their minutes. Maybe not in 2nd grade but watch out for other years.

    Another reason teachers do it is to cover their behinds. If Johnny isn't doing his work but his mom is signing the assignment notebook then I can use that when I talk to the mom.
     
  10. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Sue, great point about requiring signatures in order to cover our behinds. When Mother storms into the office because her child is failing, or has a B instead of the A she deserves, we can look back through the signature logs to demonstrate that Mother signed off two weeks ago when I wrote a quick note in the agenda about her failing the last two vocabulary tests. Apparently that signature didn't mean anything to the parent because she was too annoyed to read the note, but...behind covered.
     
  11. MissKH81

    MissKH81 Rookie

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    "IAMME," all of that signing does seem excessive. As a third grade teacher, I do have parents sign nightly reading logs, but I check it only on Mondays. Therefore, parents can fill in a time that may have been forgotten due to busy schedules. I also have them sign "Friday Folders" which contains graded work. That is also due on Mondays. I feel like assignment notebooks are the responsibility of the child. THey only need to be signed if returning homework becomes an "ISSUE."

    Explain your issue to your child's teacher. He/she may not be receptive to being flexible on this issue, but it doesn't hurt to try. Good luck
     
  12. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I require 2 daily signatures, plus 1 weekly signature.
    Everyday, parents MUST sign the reading log stating their child read for 30 minutes. They MUST also sign the agenda. Their assignments are listed in there and also any notes from me about behavior or missing assignments.
    I tell the kids on the first day of school, it is THEIR job/homework to get the signatures. Bring the parent a pen and make them sign it.
    I do not accept 'my mom forgot'. Or anything. It is the child's responsibility.
    Oh, the weekly signature is for their weekly folder containing all their assignments.

    SIgnatures are necessary because these are kids. If they can lie and weasel out of something, they will!
     
  13. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    19 students...some learning disabled, many gifted, a few who do everything they are supposed to do including study for tests and read. A few. It doesn't even matter if they are gifted...they're just as prone to slacking off or forgetting to study or thinking they've got more important things to do.

    If it says that there is a test next Tuesday in the agenda and the parent signs off, most of the parents will help their child either get organized for the test or will help them study.

    So if I don't have an agenda signature check, I get a few prepared. If I require it, I get many prepared. The same goes for reading every night and for practicing math with homework.

    I think your child is one of the exceptions who can get everything done without supervision from a parent. There aren't many of them in the elementary grades. Count your lucky stars that you have a fully prepared child, ready for taking on the responsibilities of middle and high school, and college.
     
  14. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    Misskh81- That sounds more reasonable.

    shouldbesleep-I TOTALLY get what you are saying about gifted kids....hence the one that did his homework, knew exactly where it was, but just didnt want to hand it in....grrrrr...i woulda been LESS mad at him for the "D" on his report card if he had just not done the work but to do it and choose not to get credit for it made me insane!! Thankfully his teacher was very kind about it and let him turn it in for reduced points which brought him up to a low "B".

    I think the reason my children are responsible and able to manage their assignments is because I let them be and if they don't do what they are supposed to do then they are punished. Responsibility is taught and I don't think that having a parent forced to go behind them everyday and sign off that they did what they were supposed to do is the best way to teach that. Like my son that didnt turn in his work above....he was grounded for the next nine weeks and did not receive the allowance he would have normally earned although he did the normal amount of chores, I used that as an example of how stupid it was to do work (schoolwork/chores) and not get the reward (good grades/allowance.)

    JustMe-I think that parents should be notified and a signature required IF their child is falling behind or not doing the work or having any other problems, it is the day-to-day mundane things that I feel hinder, rather than support, communication. Like I said sometimes I have limited time with my kids in the evening, usually I talk to them while we are driving, and reading an agenda is not always an option. My kids know that I support their education because we have talked about that also, and because anything less than what I know they are capable of and they lose priveleges until their grades are up.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Wow- seems like A LOT of signing...boy your hand must get SO tired...:eek:

    Seriously, the teachers who are asking you to sign off on kids' homework, etc want to make sure that they are building a school-to-home connection, that parents are aware of what is going on in school with their child and yes, it's a CYA thing. I don't ever want a parent saying to me "I didn't know little Johnny was struggling"...By signing off on the forms, I have a record that the parent saw (or at least signed saying they saw) the kids' work, report, etc. I keep an open line of communication with the parents of the kids I teach. I would never call a parent for not signing a reading log but I do call with other concerns. My parents seem to appreciate this open dialog.
     
  16. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I guess I should mention that I also sign every agenda and every reading log daily. 24 kids X 2 things= 48 signatures. If I can sign 48 things a day, I don't think it a huge inconvenience for parents to sign 2 things a day. In the morning, I take every agenda, open it, look for notes, check for a signature, open the reading log, check for the date/book/signature, initial it and hand them both back. It takes me less than 10 minutes to do while they are doing their morning work.
    In the afternoon, I glance at the agenda, look to see they wrote their homework correctly, and sign it. This takes about 5 minutes.

    I really don't see how this takes up so much time if I can sign off on 48 things daily and check another 24 all in 15 minutes.

    Now, signing vocab words and stuff is ridiculous. But, 2-3 things daily should not be a huge inconvenience.
     
  17. deedee

    deedee Connoisseur

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    To be honest thats why I have parents sign things...so it cant come back on me that they never saw/recieved information about the students.

    I have 90 6th grades who do not give their parents papers unless it says PLEASE SIGN ...many parents would go weeks without getting any information if it didnt say to sign.
     
  18. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    But why would we NEED to see these things? I guess that is the point....Like I have already stated I want to know if there is a problem and I dont mind signing those, so that is the CYA covered...but honestly I am less likely to see the ones that need to be addressed when they are mixed in with 17 folders, tests, worksheets, order forms, permission slips, ect ect ect ...yes that is right folks !!17 signatures!! that I signed tonight.....:help:
     
  19. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Seventeen? I couldn't possibly make up seventeen things for a parent to sign in one night. You're not exaggerating? If not, that is way too many.

    That said, teachers are darned if they do and darned if they don't.
     
  20. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    As a new teacher, I remember that when I was in school, only grade cards and permission slips were signed and returned.

    However, I offer bonus points to students for returning tests with parent signatures. This encourages students to show their work to their parents and often times the parents are happy to return the work if it means an extra point on a test (unfortunately often times the ones who need the extra point never return their sheets signed).

    The bonus point doesn't inflate their grade too much and it is an easy way for me to ensure that there are fewer surprises come grade card time.
     
  21. smurfette

    smurfette Habitué

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    I don't make parents sign regular things unless their particular child has problems. Especially with things like reading logs, I've found that the parents just sign off, regardless of whether or not they saw their child read. It really pained me to reward students who I knew were lying (our school had some kind or reading competition) while the kids who were honest (or whose parents were honest, busy, or working two jobs) got off scot-free.

    That said, I am sending home a note, banning makeup and fake nails in the classroom, that I am requiring the parents of all the girls to read and sign (to prove that they got it). Fourth grade is too young to be trying to reglue a fake nail during instruction.
     
  22. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Be glad you aren't a teacher at report card time. Or IEP review time. Or when you need to refer a kid to Child Study. All that times 20 kids.

    Educators are under attack in many districts. Try to understand that.
     
  23. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    Nope not exaggerating, I counted tonight just so I could post, all but one of those was for just my two daughters, and the majority was for my sixth grader whose teacher REALLY goes overboard with the signing thing, I signed a worksheet tonight that had 3 problems on it and a score of 100% and just for fun I read her agenda tonight, it said things like wb hw 1-9, read story, study, ect., not ONE specific thing. None of my children have any problems at school, other than a mild speech problem (no r's) and a tendency to talk to much (both my 8 yo) but all of them are honor roll students with no serious behavour issues. (other than the talking, and she quite literally talks non stop, even in her sleep, but she is 8, she will outgrow it....soon i hope)

    I completely agree, my 12 yo has been begging for fake nails, I wont even let her wear colored polish to school, I dont know WHAT she is thinking lol.

    I understand that, as I used to be in nursing and I can't imagine that the paperwork you do is anymore than that, and that is on a DAILY basis times on up to 60 patients depending on what specialty you are in.....However that is a job and not a home life. I am not trying to attack educators, there is NO WAY I could do your job, I am way too impatient, and am grateful that there are ppl who can do it. I just want educators to understand that there can definitely be too much of a good thing.
     
  24. deedee

    deedee Connoisseur

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    17 is crazy! If I send something home to be signed its usually about big projects or notes on behavior or hw...beside their agenda daily.

    Did school just start? Maybe the teacher is trying to get students in the habit of getting their parent to look at things and will back off on the amount of signatures as they get into the groove?
     
  25. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    We started in August. A friend of mine's child had this same teacher (the 6th grade one) and she said that the teacher could prb sign her name as well as she does after seeing it so many times, so I think this is her usual MO. I think there were 4 things for my 2nd grader, one for the 9th grader, and the rest were all from this ONE teacher! I plan on bringing it up at P/T conf. I just need to plan a nice way to say "Enough with the signing every paper, you are driving me bonkers!!" lol
     
  26. dr.gator

    dr.gator Comrade

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    "I am way too impatient"

    Could this be your problem with signing so much stuff? As many of the PP's have stated, a lot of the signing is done just to cover our rears. You'd be amazed at the amount of things that go unnoticed, and then get called in to question. IMO yes, parents should want to read planners, even if it is just a hw assignment that you are reading. It shows the kids that what's happening in their lives at school is important enough for their parent to read it, and for some children that really helps in building their overall self esteem.
     
  27. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    I know I am in the minority here, but why should the parent of a sixth grader who is doing well have to sign so many things? In my middle school, parents/teachers do not sign assignment notebooks unless that is part of an intervention for a struggling student. By the time a child is in middle school s/he should be learning to be independent and responsible for his/her own learning.
    As a parent, I agree, signing 17 things in one night is ridiculous, especially if I'm being asked to sign off on homework assignments where my child got a good grade. Ask me to sign a test? Okay, I'll do that. Sign a midterm or a report card? Yep, you betcha! A worksheet on nouns? no way.
    I think as teachers we can get up on our high horses just as much as parents can get on theirs. Sometimes, a parent does have a valid question that makes us reexamine our practice to make sure what we are doing is valid and valuable.
    Just my 2cents.
     
  28. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    Thank you! I agree with everything you said here!
     
  29. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    I have my parents sign the students daily homework log and any quizzes/tests/or heavily graded assignments. This is to ensure that they know how their child is doing throughout the quarter. No chance for a surprise when report cards come out.

    I am a little irritated that a parent would sign something without even looking at it, because there are too many things sent home that night. It shows your child that the school info in unimportant to you.

    The OP also stated that the conversation started because of a phone call (to the friend) who hadn't signed in three days. That is irresponsible of the parent. Period.

    As far as the idea that "my child doesn't get it in trouble and does all of his/her work", um should we have a list of the students who have their own separate rules? I don't think so. It is not asking too much that parents be involved in their child's education and take it seriously.

    On a side note, I would be curious to know exactly what the 17 signatures were for.
     
  30. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    Two behavior logs, two agendas, one speech folder, one reading log, one permission slip for 9th grader, one science agenda, one math, two tests one with a 87% the other with a 93%, one permission slip for the 6th grader, and the rest were worksheets.....all with at least a "B"

    Also my friend is in the middle of a move, she signed everything else, (for three kids...one who is special needs) and did make the kid read, she just forgot to sign the log....Not everyone can be a supermom.....
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2009
  31. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    I require my 3rd graders to get their planners initialed every night. They have a fact practice sheet that needs to be signed by the person that times/checks them (I tell them it can be anyone in the upper grades or older; I know many big brothers or sisters, grandmas, etc. help with homework). Other than that, I only ask for signatures on tests, etc. As others have said, it's much simpler to have everybody take something home to get signed than singling out half the kids. And I figured parents of kids who got that A on the math test would be even happier to see the test than the parents of the kid who failed.

    I have one mom who initials every piece of homework. Ironically, she is a teacher...
     
  32. newbie0809

    newbie0809 Companion

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    Oct 8, 2009

    What i do and Why

    IAMME


    As a teacher I have parents sign the behavior chart daily, their reading assignment daily, and the graded work folder once a week.

    Behavior chart- So parents can know daily how there child is doing in class good/bad. Plus there are alot of parents that..if there child is doing good or a child that has consistent discipline problems everyday such as talking and then all of sudden I have to write a note home or call the parent about something and I havent seen anything about their childs behavior they'lll get upset and say things like "I didn't know he was having any problems" whereas if they look at their chart they can see specifically how they do each day. Although this may change I would give students a reward (ie:extra ticket) for each signature they had for the week on a Monday. I know that there are things that come up where parents can't sign but I do it so I know the child is showing it to them.

    Reading assignment- Just to check off if parents are having them read each night, because unfortunately not all parents read with their kids or have them read at home. I know some may sign it just because but my goal is for parents to have their kids read.

    Weekly Graded work folder- This is kind of the same as behavior. This is so parents know how there child is doing in school. Not all kids will show parents their work especially if it's a bad grade. Also this is so when progress reports or report cards come around parents arent suprised and saying I didn't know my kid was struggling or his grade was dropping. They can look through their graded work weekly and go over with them and the goal is for them to also help them at home with things they don't understand and they can see their problem areas.
     
  33. msmullenjr

    msmullenjr Devotee

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    Oct 9, 2009

    Obviously the permission slips are not going to be daily, and the percentage is irrelevant. I want parents aware of the fluctuation of their child's grades whether they are As or Fs. Granted, I don't have parents sign regular worksheets, but if that is what your teacher requires... so be it.

    You are the one who said she "forgot" to sign it three days in a row. Maybe every mom can't be super mom, but getting irritated at a teacher for a problem that a simple signature could fix seems rude to me. You chose to come on a TEACHER forum to voice your complaint, now you get TEACHER opinions.

    Your welcome.
     
  34. Kindergarten31

    Kindergarten31 Cohort

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    If I were getting a ton of papers to be signed by one teacher, I would staple them together and sign the top one.
     
  35. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    As TEACHER, I can admit that sometimes I am wrong. The fact that this is a parent does not lessen the fact that she had a valid question to begin with. As a PARENT she has the right to ask why something happens. Perhaps (and I don't know, I could be wrong) she has done something I have done several times - ask what other teachers do before I go and make a stink about something at my child's school.

    I'm somewhat surprised that this thread has turned into an us vs. them situation. I have been following it with both my teacher and parent hats on - provides interesting perspective to look at the situation from both sides.
     
  36. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    Thank you again!

    It would seem that people are getting upset because I don't parent the way that "I am supposed to", however as long as my children are healthy, happy and succeeding I will continue with what is working, and talking to them about their grades, and what they are doing in school instead of pouring over all of the work they are doing works for us.

    msmullenjr-As for my friend who forgot to sign the paper, isnt the important thing that she did make the kid read? And do you really think that this is a legit. thing to call a parent for? I don't know any teachers on social basis to ask, I do however know many parents, and I don't know ONE who wouldn't be annoyed about that, and especially by the accusational and condesending tone used during the phone call.

    Kindergarten31- thank you that is a very good suggestion, and I might just suggest that at P/T conference.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2009
  37. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Oct 9, 2009

    Iamme, we are a pretty close knit community of teachers so I have read these posts differently (plus I skimmed some so it is possible I missed someone fussing) but I don't see anyone upset with you. They just shared what works in their classroom. Actually, I thought support for your situation was by far a common thread here.

    I think suggesting consolidating and stapling items when you meet with the teacher is a great idea. Talking about things that you dislike/don't agree with in person is usually the best approach. Let us know how the conference turns out.
     
  38. DaleJr88AmpFan

    DaleJr88AmpFan Cohort

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    Oct 9, 2009

    I don't think this should be a case of "us vs. them" because most of "us" are "them" too. :) That aside I really feel that I need to "speak" to what is going on...

    As to the original poster's frustration with the number of signatures/initials...
    I am a teacher who has learned to CMA (cover my ---) by getting signatures on pertinent information. On a nightly basis, parents are asked to review student planners (in that, they are asked to verify that "highlighted" homework has been completed at home), initial reading calendars, and sign-off on homework worksheets from either or both math & spelling. There may be additional pieces of information coming home including test results or something of the like also on any given day. Every once in a while, I will send something home by way of a note. For instance, in my monthly newsletter I had a request for chaperones, room parents, and a permission slip for an upcoming field trip. While this may have been "too much" on that one night, it happens. I have found that if I do not require signatures, some students & parents often "slide" on homework, are not aware of upcoming activities, and blame me for lack of communication. If a parent chooses not to sign something, that is their choice. HOWEVER, I will ask the student "WHY" something was not signed and there will be a consequence most often in the form of a "Missing/Late Work Notification". On that MLWN, I will note the "reason" the child gave me for the lack of the signature, homework incompletion, lack of bringing back required materials, etc. Don't think for one minute that I don't remember those excuses come conference time- I will. While there are some students & parents that are awesome, I always have the opposite too. At the beginning of the year, I absolutely require each student to obtain signatures on homework ws, planners, and tests. As the year progresses, I will remove the planner & homework signatures on a individual basis. There are students that will continue to need their signatures every night for the entire 5th grade year. I make this procedure of signing information WELL KNOWN in my newsletters and at my "back-to-school information meeting". I advise parents that I am not trying to "burden them" each night but that I am trying to start & maintain an open line of communication. By requesting the signature, I am opening that the parent is indeed doing "their homework" in reviewing the information sent home.

    As to the suggestion to staple everything together with one signature...
    I am just shaking my head. Why would you think that would be acceptable? Do you not have the same basic expectations for your students? I don't understand that at all!!!!! My procedures are mine. They are not up for negotiation for anyone. I am fair and consistant. A parent that decides arbitrarily to "buck" my system would not be meet with a positive response at all. For any and all papers that I require a sig. on, I file them or record them in a specific manner. Putting a staple up on top with one signature, would be a PITA for me. I keep many papers on file to verify WHO is being the responsible adult in the family. I have found that sometimes one parent "hides" some things from the other parent and when "things" are disclosed at conference time, I have a paper trail to prove that I notified parents. If I were to have the "one sig" thing going on, I would not have that as my "evidence" as such. Again, I believe that the expectations & procedures to be followed by the parent rather than trying to "blaze his/her own path".

    As a parent...
    I understand my role in my child's education. My role is to provide support to my child and to her teacher. I know that she will be more successful if I am backing her teacher up and not trying to question the system. That is not to say that I am a push-over. Far from it.. if something indeed was completely out-of-line, I may talk to the teacher for clarification. In the instance of having several signatures a night... well, if you have 3 kids, you will have 3TIMES the amount of communication to deal with. There are nights that I come home and feel overwhelmed-- the dishes need to get done, the laundry is piling up.. that's life!! I still need to instill in my child the need to fulfill obligations and meet expectations put forth for me. :) I do take the time to read every piece of information that is brought home by each of my children daily. Because each minute of every day of their lives is important to me, I want to be in the "know" of what is going on with them when I can not be there to coach, support, and encourage them.

    As to the teacher making contact with the parent via the phone call...
    Unless you (or I ) were on the phone during a conference call-style, I would take the tone of the teacher with a "grain of salt". While the friend may have reported the information back, we will never know the whole story. There may be background information that has been left out by the friend-- after all, it is only "human nature" to preserve and protect ourselves. While some parents may think that it would be "over the top" if a call was made to them, others may not. You'll never please everyone with the amount of communication given and received.

    Sorry for the long-winded response... I had much to say and so I have. :whistle:
     
  39. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2009

    Post snipped to address....


    Absolutely!! Patience is definately NOT my strongest virtue....


    That is another problem I have with this particular teacher and she is the only one I have ever encountered this with....That she makes my daughter pull cards if her brother signs that he is the one that helped with homework. Hence some of the not reading...I come home the girls are already in bed he says she did it and I sign it.

    You are right, I prb. did overreact, it is hard to get tone out of typed messages. I apologize if I offended.
     
  40. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Oct 10, 2009

    IAMME, I do think teachers should accept signatures from older siblings on some documents, including reading logs. Even if it is a seventh grader monitoring his third grade sibling...that's wonderful and I'll take that signature in a hearbeat.
     
  41. IAMME

    IAMME Rookie

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    Oct 10, 2009

    I (obviously) agree, alot of the time I have the yougest one read to one of the older ones while I make dinner or drive ect., I can still hear her, but they are right there to help with sounding out or correcting her.....and of course on nights when I am unable to be home they listen to her. They also do this with her speech, although I cant tell that it helps her, she can't say "run" and no matter how many time we have her say it and practice good eununciation (sp?) she still says "wun". She has a little more trouble reading than the other two did bc of this, but I am hopeful that she will outgrow it this year. (that is what my speech therapist friend says anyway)

    With the older two reading is not an issue. My son reads at an adult level and my 6th grader finished the "Twiligiht" saga in 4 days, we are a family of avid readers. All of them could read 100+ words before kindergarten, and my son was doing simple multiplication and division at age 3 and was accelerated through 5th grade, so I feel completely comfortable with them helping each other on homework, although if my son is stumped in algebra I have to call my nephew lol, bc I am NO help.
     

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