Parent satisfaction

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by John Lee, Jun 7, 2015.

  1. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Jun 7, 2015

    If parents are satisfied/happy with you, bottom line: does that mean you've done a good job?

    I ask, because I feel that I've done an average job (at best). I really do. (Not trying to humble-brag here either.) But my class parents took it upon themselves to write a letter to the district (I think to my P), relating their satisfaction and support of me this past year. (I work at a school where parents are very involved.)

    I'm just a bit confused. I don't think I'm being hard on myself (saying I did an average job). Am I putting too much stock into the parents gesture (writing a letter to the district)? Is the bottom line in teaching that your "customers" (i.e. parents) approve of you?
     
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  3. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    How many parents and how often did you see them in the back of your classroom during instruction?

    If they are in your class on a regular basis, then I would put some stick in it. if they are not really in your room, then I would put little into it.
     
  4. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    I wonder why they wrote the letter. Are you probationary and they felt the letter would support whether or not you were granted tenure?
     
  5. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Parents know their kids best. If the parents think you're doing a good job, you're probably doing something right, particularly in a school with involved parents.

    Parents see the quality and quantity of work that goes home, they have conversations with their kids, they see them doing homework, they see how the kids are doing socially and emotionally, etc. I would definitely consider to be a sign that you're doing okay.
     
  6. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Temporary contract. It actually begs another question I have, because (as I've said in past) I have schools in other districts who would offer me a contract. I wonder whether I should more actively pursue those, even though my current school wants me back for next year and has basically said I will be back (though they have not had me sign anything at this point).

    Part of my issue is in trying to find the place where I'm least likely to be jettisoned when the SHTF in economy terms. I'm resigned to the fact that I'll be receiving pink-slips annually at this point. But obviously, what I would like is the situation where that pink-slip is least likely to actually occur. If I'm able to get some sort of status with one district (probationary or otherwise) and a lower status with this current school/district, I wonder whether I should jump at it... even if it burns the bridges I've made with my current school.

    (In an effort to be more flexible/available for employment, I'm considering trying to add a math authorization to teach middle school Would all I would need to take be a course and passing of CSET? I'm not looking to embark on another set of courses, though as I now investigate, it does seem like they want you to embark on a whole series of courses.)
     
  7. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    If you have schools in other districts that will offer you a probationary contract, I'd take one of their job offers in a nanosecond.

    Although your current district has said you'll be back, the fact is that you don't have a contract for next year. Bottom line: they are not obligated to bring you back on board. Temporary is temporary.
     
  8. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    If the contract is temporary, I think it's lovely the parents are putting in a good word.

    I'd say parental satisfaction is a good indicator of performance. I wouldn't say it's the end-all epitome, but it's certainly to be credited. And yes, on an elementary level, I'd say the parents are your customers. They're entrusting you to teach their kiddos.
     
  9. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I think parents are a poor indicator of a teacher's competence. I don't put much stock in what they have to say. We come from radically different sides of a coin. Parents want what is best for their children but often the idea of "best" is different.

    At my school I will have parents that hate me because their straight-A children are working for a B. That's the number one gripe from parents. In the same classroom I'll have kids whose parents hate me because I send the kids out for dress code violations ("you're the ONLY teacher that follows the rules!").

    These parents have no clue what it takes to be a teacher. They're only seeing how my policies affect their lives.

    Sadly, the school board, which seldom has teachers sitting on it, LOVES parental opinion. So sometimes it does make a difference.
     
  10. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    I enjoy getting letters of satisfaction. I think I as well, did an okay job this year. It was my first year in fifth grade from a LONG time away where I was teaching kindergarten for the past 8 years prior. So, this year was an adjustment. I made many mistakes. But a few parents noticed although I may have made a few errors, that my passion for teaching was top notch. My confidence at times was lacking, but knowing that I had the support of my parents made things easier. Receiving a letter of satisfaction in my opinion isn't about them "approving" of you but letting your principal know you have many positive traits. Many times principals only hear about how you are doing as a teacher when they are DISsatisfied. I think they were simply letting your boss know they thought you were great!
     
  11. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Dumb question, but do my temporary years (worked last year under similar circumstance) somehow help in any way (with current district) in terms of my probationary status, if they offer me that for the upcoming?

    You and I are like peas in a pod then. :)
     
  12. London

    London Rookie

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    Jun 9, 2015

    You may want to check your state's rules for probationary/temporary teacher status. For example, in my state, if I move districts, I would start over as a temporary status and not gain "tenure" until 3 consecutive years teaching in the district, no matter how long I've been teaching as a whole. Our districts do not have us actually sign contracts until well into the school year, school board approval of hire/rehire is considered the contract, though this may change this year. If your school has said they will rehire you, ask them when that decision will be finalized (however your state does that). For instance, a 2nd year teacher got a verbal "you will be rehired next year" and the principal submits a list of temporary rehires to the school board to approve. Not sure what the difference in probationary or temporary is in your state, but there is no difference in mine and NO district can give a new teachers (whether they've been teaching for 1 year or 20) to their district a continuing contract.
     
  13. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    In my district, the year(s) as a temporary teacher do not count toward the probationary period. The probationary period does not begin until a permanent contract is offered.

    For example, even if a teacher worked 5 years as a temp and was then offered a permanent contract in year 6, they'd still have to complete two years as a probationary teacher (even though they'd be paid as a year 6 teacher).

    I know it sounds ridiculous, but that's why I always tell people to avoid temporary contracts unless it's a very last resort.
     

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