Parent has it out for me

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by indianahusky39, Sep 25, 2010.

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  1. indianahusky39

    indianahusky39 New Member

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    I have a parent with a vendetta against me this year and it's making me crazy. She blames me for her kid getting on the wrong bus the
    2nd day of school(I sent them at the right time, but I can't walk them to the bus. I have to stay in my room with the other children,, but she says I should have left the other children alone to walk her kid to the bus). Since then she has harassed me with notes accusing me of not doing my job, as well as to my face in meetings. Any school policy/procedure she doesn't agree with, is me not doing my job. She even hunted down another child's home to harass them about her child's supposed injury sustained in school, which was explained to me as an accident by her child.
    She has told me that other parents have told her I'm a terrible teacher, yet she says that no matter what, her child will not be moved out of my class like she's trying to punish me. She wrote religious things such as prayers in her child's agenda when in her opinon there weren't any problems caused by me that day or a note about how I failed to do my job.
    My principal has been very supportive and has taken his share of abuse from her too. She's been to the superintendent and complained about both of us by the 3rd day of school! I thought things quieted down last week, but on Thursday she was back in his office for 45 min. He never told me what it was about.
    Now I'm having dreams about this witch picking on my lessons plans and grades(via the parent portal) and working under her microscope has made my job a misery to go to everyday. She's like a piranha taking one unrelenting bite out of my enthusiasm after another and I'm considering other career options.
    Any advice would be great.:help:
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    If your principal is supportive and has also faced the wrath of this parent, you are probably 'safe'. Some parents just develop a certain reputation and while it is difficult for the classroom teacher who has the student that year, the administration takes most comments from such parents with a 'grain of salt' (or in some cases a box of salt). :rolleyes: Just don't take your frustration out on the kid and you'll be fine.
     
  4. Starista

    Starista Cohort

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    *hugs*

    I am so sorry you have a parent like this -- try to remember that it's just for one school year. Hopefully she'll mellow out by midschool year,but if not it sounds like you have a supportive principal.

    Also ~ I notice this is your first post... WELCOME TO A to Z! This is a wonderful and friendly place with teachers both newer and seasoned -- you're very welcome here. :)
     
  5. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Glad to hear your P is supportive! That's the most important thing, first and foremost. Try to take her words with a grain of salt and try to have it go in one ear and out the other otherwise you will drive yourself crazy. Is it possible to ban or restrict her from being in your classroom at any time? I would also save EVERYTHING she has written and put it in a file. You may also want to work with your P and discuss a different classroom if you think that would make it easier for you.
     
  6. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Mr. Know-It-All

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    The advice to save everything she writes is good advice, in case she starts to make wild claims. The next best advice I can give you is to start documenting everything she says to you, because that will protect you too if she decides to take things to the next level, and succeeds. It's a pain in the rump, but worth it if you end up needing it. Lastly, I would start talking in generalizations with her. Nod your head, say "yes, I'm sorry that happened, but those are the rules..." stuff like that. If there's anything serious that she complains about or attacks, tell her you'll talk to the principal about it, or refer her to the principal. Dont let her get under your skin, but don't give her any more ammo either. The principal and the district are already aware of her, so you should be safe. the trick is too let her talk, and then get her out as quickly as possible.

    In my last year of teaching, we had a parent like that. All the other teachers and the principal used to hide from her because it was just a pain in the rump to deal with. I got skilled at listening to her (or at least making her think I was listening to her), and getting her out of the building as fast as possible, so I would often be the one she dealt with when she came on campus. Not fun, but it had to be done. Good luck.
     
  7. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    You need to change this image of her in your mind right away. Instead, view her as a desperate person trying helplessly to grasp a rope that's out of her reach that will rescue her out of her situation.

    She's an emotional mess, but you DON'T need to let this affect you in this way. You will encounter difficult parents in your career; it is nothing personal, and chances are excellent that others find this person very difficult to deal with. All other professions have their share of difficult people.

    You just need to learn strategies for dealing with them, and a good strategy to start with is to realize that she has no power over you. That recognition will make you feel more calm and better able to deal with her.
     
  8. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    It is excellent advise to document everything.

    My sons' school had a parent similar to this. Eventually the school got a restraining order against her so she was no longer allowed on the school campus or within X feet from the school. We all felt sorry for the child and tried to give him a lot of positive attention because he was humiliated by her actions, including yelling nasty things through the fence while kids were on the playground. I think CPS got involved, too.
     
  9. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    The hardest thing in this case, for me, would be not taking out my feelings on the child. It's not fair, and it's not nice, but I find that when there is a pain in the ____ parent, I tend to feel differently about the kid. So, here's what I do. PRETEND. Pretend you love the kid, pretend he's your favorite kid ever, be super nice to him. Because, eventually, acting that way begins to feel normal, and it's not an act anymore. But I caution you not to let the bad feelings for the parent carry over to how you deal with the child...it's easy to do and it will just spell disaster in the end.
     
  10. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    You've received great advice so far, especially documenting everything she says or writes.

    It's wonderful that your principal is supportive. Sounds like (s)he has gotten an earful from this person as well (and I'm sure been the subject of her outrageous attacks too when she went to the super).

    Just realize that there is likely nothing you can do to actually appease this woman, so you will likely have to do like Sam and just find a way to appear to be listening. Also realize that anyone else who meets this woman see her true colors just quickly as you and the principal have. Her comment about other parents not liking you is a bunch of BS. It reminds me of a similar statement my ex made when she realized she could not keep me from visiting our boys every morning at school. I knew her comment was just a reaction to the fact I was doing something that she could not prevent or control and she didn't like it.

    It does sound like this woman has some serious issues going on. Unfortunately, it's hard to be sympathetic when you're the one being targeted by these issues.

    Just hold your head up and know for certain that it IS NOT ABOUT YOU! It really isn't. Maybe you and she can reach a common ground and a calmer relationship. In the meantime, just be professional, make general statements, be sugary-nice to her every time you speak and document, document, document every interaction with her.
     
  11. indianahusky39

    indianahusky39 New Member

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    Thanks to everyone for your advice. My P has told me similar things about not taking it personally and I'm having a hard time with that. Maybe it will come over time.

    I have documented my interactions with her and have copies of everything she has sent me in writing so far. Since the head of security for the district and my head union rep had to get involved, our security guard and secretaries are forbidden to allow her access to anywhere in the building but the office. My P has also said I do not have to speak to her without someone else present. For Back to School Night, I had 2 other teachers, the school social worker and the child's guidance counselor in my room as back-up, but she didn't show.

    For the last week, she has only listed what she worked on with her child in the agenda with some code she came up with, relating to no problems I think. She prefers to complain to my P in person.

    As far as taking it out on the child, I would never do that. I'm afraid though that she interprets anything I say or do as picking on her child. The child is rather immature. A lot of crying, noise making, loses focus easily and wants things their way. I find myself easing up on my classroom behavior mod even though my P said to not let her micromanage my classroom, to avoid retaliation.

    I guess I just have to deal with it as best I can, but I've never dealt with anything like this before during my 13 years of teaching and my anxiety disorder/depression doesn't help the situation. I just want to have fun with my students and educate them in the process. This kind of interference just makes me sad for all parties involved, but for the children most of all.:(

    Thanks again for the advice and support.
     
  12. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Yep....document, document, document. Not just what she says/writes to you, but what you say to her as well. Make sure it's objective and not subjective, too, so that it's got more validity.

    I'm sorry she's causing you so much angst. If you can, try to revel in the delightfulness of the children. Have fun with them, and do the best job that you can do in spite of her. It might not have an affect on her but it just might make your days a little bit better. :)
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    How on earth did a primary student not get on the right bus? I understand that it wasn't your responsibility, but whose responsibility was it? I can understand the poor mom being frightened out of her mind. She's assuming that if you're lax about something so basic as her child's safety, you're going to be lax about other things.

    Rather than just supporting you, I think your principal should take the bull by the horns. Admit that someone, not you, but someone else on staff made a huge mistake and let her six or seven year old board the wrong bus. And that the problem has been corrected and will NOT be repeated.

    Then, of course, you do as has been suggested: document EVERYTHING.
     
  14. Icare

    Icare Rookie

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    Oh my, I was going to post the same thing Aliceacc did. If that happened to my child, you bet I would be watching over every move that teacher made. I wouldn't be rude, but I would be assertive. And since nothing has changed regarding the matter, I would know it could happen again and having a lost child is pretty scary. Your policy should not be tolerated and be changed immediatly!

    Someone should be at the bus making sure kids are put on the right ones. Plus you said this child has issue's.... well that's even more a reason for him to have help with this matter.

    If the school looses a child, don't you think there could be a huge lawsuit just waiting to happen. Change your policy, show the parent you understand her, then maybe things will get better all on their own.
     
  15. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    It can happen. It happened to William last year right after we moved here. New school, end of day chaos, it happens. Of course, the school called me before I ever had a chance to find out otherwise, and the P drove him home right away. I think that made a huge difference in my reaction to the situation.
     
  16. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    With bus drivers being in a hurry to drop off the kids so they can be on time for the next run, and kindergarten kids not remembering which bus they take (apart from "the yellow one") it happens quite often in elementary schools. We do have bus drivers that will notify us if a child seems to be on the wrong bus, and then we take care of the issue, and while I wouldn't say it happens all the time, it DOES happen. Welcome to elementary school life.
     
  17. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    You are definitely handling the situation in the best manner possible, especially making sure you have at least 1-2 other people in the room as witnesses for any potential interaction with the parent. I'm sorry you are having to deal with this and I know how difficult it can be.

    When I worked in the hospital environment, we had a resident in our nursing home with a daughter that made life miserable for nurses, staff, director and administrator every single day. The director had to draft extra policies specifically for dealing with her and the daughter literally had the State Inspectors on speed dial. She would rail at the administrator for hours about the horrible treatment her father was receiving, but when he once offered to see if another facility could accept her father, she became even more infuriated and accused him (in a letter to the editor) of trying to "kick her dad out of the nursing home".

    At least you should only have to deal with this parent for one school year. Our nurses had to put up with this daughter for several years until her father eventually passed away.
     
  18. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    If this is your school's policy, then it's deeply flawed.

    My school's system isn't much better, but at least we all march our classes to the front of the school near where the buses are and wait for parents there.
     
  19. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    We also don't have people walk our young kids to the buses, not after the first week of school. We just don't have the staff. It's the teachers' planning time, so they won't do it. We have a carpool line, so those kids get hand-walked to the cars by safety students, but the bus kids are on their own, as early as KDG.

    BTW, I teach PreK and use my planning time to walk my class to the bus (the aide waits with those that haven't yet gone). I'd rather plan on my own time than lose a child, but that's just me.
     
  20. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    No longer responding to the original post, but... wow!!!

    Of all the things that take priority in an elementary school, I would think the top 3, especially that first week, would be:
    - ensuring everyone has lunch
    - ensuring everyone gets to the bathroom
    - ensuring everyone gets on the right bus.

    I've read volumes here about the priorities in an elementary classroom--- it has never occurred to me that there wasn't an adult specifically responsible for getting the right kid onto the right bus.
     
  21. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Alice, I agree whole heartedly. I think, the reason why I wasn't very upset when it happened to my kid was that it was taken care of immediately. As soon as the bus driver realized that he wasn't supposed to have the new kid, he called in to transportation, who called into the school, where they immediately called me and made alternate arrangements to get him home. I don't know if I would have been quite so forgiving if the bus got here and my kid wasn't on it.
     
  22. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    I'm with you, Alice. I think this is one of those things that really hit home with me after I became a mom. Those moms of those kids are TRUSTING that I'll get their kid home to them.

    As far as lunch, my own 1st grader has come home many days with uneaten lunches. She can't open part of it, and gives up. No one notices. And this is at MY OWN SCHOOL, and the people on duty know me and like me - I'd think they'd be looking out for her. But I guess not. Bathrooming - we used to have group bathroom breaks but they went out the window about a decade ago. I'm just grateful that I have my own bathroom in my class and my kids can go whenever they have the need.
     
  23. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    About the bus - in elementary schools where I've worked the kids are taken by grade clusters. All of the first grade bus riders go to Teacher A's classroom. All the daycare van riders go to Teacher B's classroom. All the walkers go to Teacher C's classroom and all the bus riders go to Teacher D's classroom. Teacher D takes the kids out to the bus with her list and loads the kids onto the bus. Car riders are released next, then walkers and then day care vans. Students in 3rd grade and up are not walked to the bus but instead go to the library and wait for their bus to be called. Works really well.

    As far as eating lunch? I'd never expect a teacher to monitor my child's food intake. If my kid is hungry, she'll learn to eat when she has the opportunity the next day. If she can't open her lunch time after time, I'd suggest getting different containers for her. I made practice lunches for my daughter's before they started kindergarten. I taught them how to open the containers and what to do with the leftover food/plastic. Maybe a few such lessons will help?
     
  24. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I was thinking more along the lines of ensuring that each kid found the cafeteria and had time to actuallly eat. I don't think that anyone expects teachers to ensure that little Susie actually eats her PB&J.

    But I do think that the school has an incredible responsibility to ensure that the kids, particularly kids too young to READ, get on the right bus!!!! This is a BIG GLARING MISTAKE, not a little error. The potential for harm to that small child was HUGE.

    If the school had lost my child, allowing him or her to get on the wrong bus on the second day of school, you can bet your life that people would hear about it.

    I'm all for forgive and forget for some things. But before they can THINK about teaching academics, a school's primary responsibility is to try to ensure the safety of the children in its care. That means that SOMEONE has the job of trying to put the right child onto the right bus.

    And when they drop the ball bigtime, as happened here, someone steps up and takes responsibility.

    I don't blame the mom in the OP for wanting someone's head to roll. Whether it was the classroom teacher or someone else, I would want to ensure that whoever endangered my child in such a way wouldn't do it again, next time with potentiallly much worse results.
     
  25. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    The student getting on the wrong bus does not at all seem to be the teacher's fault here. She is operating under her administrator's expectations. I think when you have the right to be angry, you need to make sure that anger is channeled to the right person...the person who has the ability to make changes or otherwise right the situation. In this case, not the classroom teacher. Should the teacher be made aware? Heck, yeah! But I don't feel at all that the anger should be directed at the teacher.
     
  26. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Agreed-- I stated back there somewhere that I (at least) was now addressing the school policy.

    But someone's head should roll.
     
  27. Eshields1014

    Eshields1014 Rookie

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    I think the P should move the student to another class, not giving "you" or the "parent" the option that way she wont think it was you who wanted the student moved, he took it upon him self to make that choice..
     
  28. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I find it odd too.

    The policy around here is the teachers stay in the classroom with the bussers (The walkers and kids getting picked up parents get dismissed 5 minutes before the bussers to avoid confusion and problems in the parking lot)

    Then the bussers line up in the hallway by grade, then they go to their buses. There is a teacher/aide by each bus who, at the beginning of the year, has a roster of who is supposed to be on the bus, and makes sure the right students are on the right bus (They keep the roster for the first ~2 weeks of school, or longer as needed). All of the people who have bus duty that week have radios to keep in communcation.
     
  29. bros

    bros Phenom

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    When I was in elementary school, the lunch/recess aides would watch the students and help them if they needed it (I think, at least that is how it was for the table specifically for my sped class)
     
  30. Cerek

    Cerek Aficionado

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    Unfortunately, the parent doesn't seem to realize it wasn't the teacher's fault.
     
  31. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    I placed a child on the wrong bus the second day of school...whose fault was it? The mother's! She wrote the wrong address and bus number on the enrollment form. But when the bus driver realized that the little 6 year old was not his, he called the school and I called mom. She met the bus at the bus barn. She was just happy that while he was on the wrong bus, he was with school officials and safe. It happens, but how it is handled makes the difference.


    Also, I am the only teacher in my grade level. So I have had to put up with parents who "hate" me. The best advice I have is to document everything. Double check everything you send home. Do not treat her child different. And remember the child can't help who his/her parents are.
     
  32. Icare

    Icare Rookie

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    The teacher represents the school. the teacher should be telling the parent to contact the principle if they want the system to be changed, and it should.

    Loosing a child is bad. Loosing a child with "issue's" is worse.
     
  33. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    It's someone's fault.

    The principal is "supportive of the teacher." Wonderful. He's covering his own tush because his policies have allowed a child to be placed into harm's way. A teacher followed school policy, and as a result a child was lost. The teacher SHOULD receive support. But the principal should be doing some serious explaining.

    The parent wants reassurance that her child is in safe hands, and apparently hasn't gotten that.

    No one is suggesting that the parent's actions are appropriate. She's way over the line.

    But I simply cannot wrap my head around the idea that this 5 or 6 year old child was put on the wrong bus, and that apparently it was no one's job to ensure that that didn't happen.

    And that apparently that isn't an uncommon scenario.

    I can appreciate that the classroom teacher had to be with the walkers. So they were safe. Who was with the bussers?

    When each of my kids entered kindergarten, we received a call the night before school started. "Hi, Mrs. A, this is Mrs. D. We're looking forward to having Kira in my class this year. I have it on my form that she's a busser... is that correct?... Good. And what bus number is she on?.... OK, so she's on bus #62. Could you please make sure that information is on the sticker I sent to you, and that it's secure on the shirt she's wearing?" (The walkers had a different sticker.)

    Some teachers have bus duty, others take the walkers.

    I had always thought, until reading this thread that THAT was pretty much the way it was done with small kids.
     
  34. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Alice, I'm sure this won't change your mind, and I'm sure you think my school is horrible based on what I said previously in this thread, but with hundreds of young students, things are bound to happen from time to time. We have NEVER lost a child. Much like mmswm's situation, if a child gets on the wrong bus, the bus driver notices and contacts the school. We contact the parents, and the child gets on the second bus (with the 3-5 students).

    There are checks and balances, but I'm totally confused about who on earth can make sure that all 200+ K-2 students get on the exact right bus, and don't wander away from the group they are with to get on their friend's bus.

    Our Principal and Vice-Principal are in charge of dismissal, but issues come up, whether it's a student misbehaving on the way to a bus, or a pushy parent that won't wait until buses are loaded.

    Could things be run more smoothly, I'm sure they could, but rolling heads is not what is needed.

    If a child was truly "lost" that would be different.

    BTW, I also sent one of my students on the wrong bus on the first day of school. Mom came in in the morning and said she wasn't sure which bus he took. We got the bus information from transportation sometime that morning, and this child's name was on it. I checked the address, and all information we had seemed to him pointing to the bus that turned out to be wrong. Mom was understandably not happy, but understood that her son was not in danger, and knew that the problem would be solved.
     
  35. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Do the parents know that? That there's no way to ensure that their kids are on the right bus?

    It was the second day of school. I think it's probably safe to assume that the vast majority of those primary kids didn't know what bus they were on-- that they could not take responsibility for getting on the right bus without guidance from the adults whose job it is to protect them. That the bus drivers wouldn't know which of the new young students were his and which were not.

    I think the kid WAS truly "lost."

    So how do schools ensure that kids go where they should?

    I've read thread after thread after thread after thread about themes in classrooms, but to the best of my knowledge, no one has ever posted a thread asking how they can ensure that these small children get home after school. Why is that not a HUGE priority?????

    During our freshman orientation, we took time out to walk all 600 freshmen outside, and show them where each and every one of the 100+ busses would be after school. And then we made a point of telling them exactly what to do if they couldn't find their bus.

    These kids are 14. Many of them outweigh me, most are taller than I am. All can read, all have cell phones. Yet the administratin knows that getting them home safely is a priority, and took steps to ensure that it happened. With 14 year old high school students.

    Why on EARTH are those same steps not taken in elementary school? And aren't we long overdue on a conversation on how to ensure the safety of those children?

    "Issues come up" that keep the principal and AP from assuring that the kids are safe? Then it should be someone else's job, or someone should cover, or those issues can wait half an hour.

    I'm one of those parents who got a phone call 2 years ago saying my daughter wasn't in school, when I knew she should be. And, while I correclty assumed that it was teacher error (she was sitting there in her kindergarten class the whole time, but had been marked absent) I can't begin to tell you the thoughts that go through a parent's mind when the school can't locate their child.

    It should not happen. It should not be acceptable.
     
  36. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Sep 27, 2010

    I know this isn't the OP's original thread intent either but I felt like chiming in to what our school does for dismissal. We have 3 different drop off points in our school depending on how they go home. They are on opposite sides of the building. So I start with dropping off those who are on the bus. I make sure to wait until there is at least 2 adults in the hall (aides) (1 adult for coordinating the outside and 1 adult for watching the students). Then I go to the after school program. I wait until the staff is at the door to let them in. Then I go to the parent pick up. I do not leave them until there is at least 2 staff there. Then I go back to the bus area and stay for a bit because this is the more popular option and they need more support. We aren't required to go except Fridays. So if I see that it is under control, I might leave. I'm not the only teacher that stays for at least a portion of the time. While I said at least 2 staff, there are more that show up. 1 person has the clipboard. 1 person is lining kids up. 1 person is watching the rest of the hall (relatively small school). 1 person is coordinating with the bus. The PP area doesn't need as much support but they still require at least 2-3 staff. Our job as teachers, should we stay, is simply to interact with the students so they stay happy and under control while the aide support staff take care of the rest. We have a transportation manager. At the end of the day we get a laminated check list that tells us where every child needs to be. Children do know their bus number and sit in the hall accordingly but someone also checks it against a master check list before they pile onto the bus.

    WE STILL get kids in the wrong place and about once a year we have to call parents or do some major fixing. I don't know how it happens but it does. I suspect it is because parents are allowed to change where they want their child up until noon but the transportation manager allows it until 2pm.

    My parents find out really quickly that the transportation manager is in charge. I don't tend to receive notice that their child is changing. If I do, I send a reply to redirect. All parents have her pager address. They use it. All bus drivers also have it.

    There is a lot of procedures in place and it still happens. For me, my job is making sure I follow the laminated check list and accurately get those students where they need to go. Just last week though I had a student's name checked to go to PP and this student is NEVER PP so I double checked. It was on the master list as bus though so even if I hadn't checked, someone would have hauled themselves down to the PP area to recover the child.
     
  37. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Sep 27, 2010

    Our school is relatively small, and our K and 1st teachers walk with their students the first few days to make sure they are on the right bus, and we still have problems arise. When you have that many little ones, mistakes happen. I understand that it was stressful for the mom when it happenes (btw, can't tell you how many times bus drivers bring little ones back to us because there is no one at home), but she is not making things better. If she truly wants to see change in the school, then she should be approaching the principal and school board. To me, it sounds like she has a vendetta, and no matter how bad the bus incident was, she has no right to do that.
    Let's not stray too far from the intent of this thread. It's obvious the original poster feels bad about what happened with the child, but she had no control over it. It might be different at some of your schools, but at both school I work at, I could go to my principal to talk about an area I'm concerned with, but it's up to administration to make a change. All we can do is point out weaknesses.
     
  38. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Sep 27, 2010

    That assumption would be incorrect. In fact, I've already stated that the bus drivers are very good at contacting us if a student is on the wrong bus.
     
  39. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Sep 27, 2010

    Over a hundred busses? We had six, maybe, in elementary...and that was for the entire town. And that included all the students from kindergartener to senior. So I can see how with having so many busses—really, I can't imagine that—a greater, collective effort would need to be made.

    While we had a couple students get on the wrong bus throughout my school career, it wasn't ever a major deal because of the school's small size. My sister was forced to get on the wrong bus, actually, because the sixth grade bus monitor told her to. Anyway, it's not okay. Big district or not.

    Alice, what you described earlier about the phone calls and stickers...that's very impressive. Really. I'm unfortunately confident we couldn't rely on the majority of our parents on their end... :(
     
  40. kitekrazy

    kitekrazy Rookie

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    Sep 27, 2010

    That's the problem with America and public schools. The parent is taken out of the picture and they are happy to push the responsibility on someone else.

    Too bad politicians don't see that.

    I would suggest voodoo as a career option. Nothing like some payback.
     
  41. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Sep 27, 2010

    Buses

    Have to chime in on the bus issues.
    We're a medium size elementary (650 kiddos in 1st & 2nd grades) and we are very structured about who goes home when and where. Every child must have a tag on their backpack strap that has the child's name, bus number, drop off address, and contact number. Teachers are assigned buses and may work with their partner on how they break up duty for the school year (we do ours by semester). Each line has a bus list that must be checked off and handed in to the office right after buses leave. For the first 2 weeks the bus drivers do a second check list until they get to know all of their kids. These checklists are done at each of our elementary schools in the district. It helps us know quickly if a child went home the way they were supposed to. On the first day of school we do a practice run (after teachers showing students where to go on their own).
     
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