P.E in primary school

Discussion in 'P.E. Teachers' started by Marieespe, Dec 4, 2019.

  1. Marieespe

    Marieespe New Member

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    Dec 4, 2019

    Hello, I am a master student in France to become a school teacher. I am interested in the place of physical education in infant school and junior school in England. I would have liked to know different things including:
    - What is the real place of physical education in the field in relation to programmes?
    - What is the hourly rate for this discipline? Do students do physical education every day when they are in infant school ?
    - Is swimming very important?

    Thanks for your answers.

    Marie
     
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  3. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Dec 4, 2019

    I'm in the U.S. rather than England, but I can give some insight to P.E. in the U.S. Our schools are generally labeled as preschool (under 5-years-old), KIndergarten and elementary school (grades 1-5), middle school (grades 6-8), and high school (grades 9-12). These grade levels aren't strictly followed in every district and some districts have other names for their grade level groupings. In elementary school, P.E. is usually taught once or twice a week; again, that amount can vary. The class length is typically about 40 minutes; usually additional time is allowed for use of the restrooms and water fountain. The structure of the class also varies.

    I'm 61. Growing up, in elementary school, I recall class beginning with a jog for several laps around the blacktop playground. Then we'd do calisthenics and play a game. The fundamentals of how to play sports were also taught and sometimes we'd focus on a specific skill, such as dribbling a basketball, throwing a ball, etc. In junior high, (now often called middle school), mostly we'd concentrate on sports rules and play these sports, or we'd work with various gym apparatus. We also worked on track and field activities.

    In today's classes, I'm more familiar with elementary. When I first began teaching, I recall "movement education" was emphasized. I'm not totally familiar with this, but I recall the students often stood or sat within a "personal space" and measure out this distance. Aside from this, I also recall that various physical skills relevant to age levels were practiced, again, such as throwing and catching an object, balancing, running, etc. Fair play is also emphasized.

    Aside from P.E., U.S. schools are currently debating and experimenting with both more active recess periods and less or no active recess periods. The research indicates the need for active recess breaks during the day, but often schools fall prey to scheduling conflicts in order to cram more stuff in the day. This is due to (in my opinion) an overemphasis on standardized test scores. This emphasis is a result of the lower scorings, nationally, on the Pisa tests, which (again, in my opinion) do not truly reflect our national achievement in education. Research is also currently indicating that some students in our country are experiencing academic difficulty, not due to the education system but due to the current culture outside of school (lack of parent-child communication to develop language skills, students avoiding reading and not being read to by their parents, and other social factors). Sorry, I got off the main subject, but that seems to be the reason for the lack of recess time, and if I'm recalling correctly, some schools have even experimented with eliminating P.E. somewhat.
     
  4. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Dec 4, 2019

    I'm in the U.S. rather than England, but I can give some insight to P.E. in the U.S. Our schools are generally labeled as preschool (under 5-years-old), KIndergarten and elementary school (grades 1-5), middle school (grades 6-8), and high school (grades 9-12). These grade levels aren't strictly followed in every district and some districts have other names for their grade level groupings. In elementary school, P.E. is usually taught once or twice a week; again, that amount can vary. The class length is typically about 40 minutes; usually additional time is allowed for use of the restrooms and water fountain. The structure of the class also varies.

    I'm 61. Growing up, in elementary school, I recall class beginning with a jog for several laps around the blacktop playground. Then we'd do calisthenics and play a game. The fundamentals of how to play sports were also taught and sometimes we'd focus on a specific skill, such as dribbling a basketball, throwing a ball, etc. In junior high, (now often called middle school), mostly we'd concentrate on sports rules and play these sports, or we'd work with various gym apparatus. We also worked on track and field activities.

    In today's classes, I'm more familiar with elementary. When I first began teaching, I recall "movement education" was emphasized. I'm not totally familiar with this, but I recall the students often stood or sat within a "personal space" and measure out this distance. Aside from this, I also recall that various physical skills relevant to age levels were practiced, again, such as throwing and catching an object, balancing, running, etc. Fair play is also emphasized.

    Aside from P.E., U.S. schools are currently debating and experimenting with both more active recess periods and less or no active recess periods. The research indicates the need for active recess breaks during the day, but often schools fall prey to scheduling conflicts in order to cram more stuff in the day. This is due to (in my opinion) an overemphasis on standardized test scores. This emphasis is a result of the lower scorings, nationally, on the Pisa tests, which (again, in my opinion) do not truly reflect our national achievement in education. Research is also currently indicating that some students in our country are experiencing academic difficulty, not due to the education system but due to the current culture outside of school (lack of parent-child communication to develop language skills, students avoiding reading and not being read to by their parents, and other social factors). Sorry, I got off the main subject, but that seems to be the reason for the lack of recess time, and if I'm recalling correctly, some schools have even experimented with eliminating P.E. somewhat.
     
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  5. Marieespe

    Marieespe New Member

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    Dec 4, 2019

    Thank you very much for your answer, it's really interesting!
     
  6. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Dec 6, 2019 at 6:39 AM

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