Overqualified for What You're Applying For?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Ms. I, Aug 12, 2011.

  1. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    In this especially tough economy, we may not always get a teachng position, but have to resort to applying for TA (teacher's aide), paraprofessional, even retail, cust service, & other jobs that we're overqualified for.

    Are there even times when you have as much education/skills as the person interviewing you? Comments? :)


    I'm not applying for teaching jobs. I'm trying out for SLPA jobs because I don't think I'm quite ready for the IEP paperwork/mtgs & assessment part of the SLP job since I just started grad school & I want to know what I'm doing, yet still make good $ to live on my own, etc. Many districts will hire a person on a waiver where they give them the FT job & full salary, but will give them usually 2 yrs to get accpeted & start grad school. This is for SLPs I'm talking about. Well, I've been offered the chance to do that, but I admit I'm nervous because I want to do a good job.

    Yes, there's been times I have as much (or more) ed than my interviewers. We do what we have to do! :)
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Regardless of having more education than someone conducting an interview, the fact remains that they have a job and the candidate needs a job.
    Being 'overqualified' for a job doesn't mean you'd be good at it. Using the term 'resort to applying for jobs we're overqualified for' demeans those who hold those positions.
    Getting experience and growing in understanding through 'entry level' positions is how many many professionals start their careers. When interviewing for such positions, have respect for those conducting the interview, be thankful for the consideration, and learn from the experience if you are offered the job.:2cents:
     
  4. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    So Ms. I, you've been offered an SLP position? You say that you don't feel ready for the paperwork, assessments, etc, are you thinking of taking this on anyway? Will there be other SLPs who you resource if you have questions?
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I remember the first day Ken started in my school. He was terrified and almost bolted for the door. A few of us welcomed him and got him a quick cup of coffee.

    I remember John's first day. It was my first year as department chair.

    Ken is now the Assistant principal, John is the department chair.
    I have more experience than either of them. That doesn't matter-- both are now my boss. And I'm delighted and honored to work for both of them.

    I think we can assume that every person doing the interviewing is in that position because he or she is the right person to be doing so.

    And to be honest, the qualifications we see on paper are NOT always a good indication of a person's capabilities. Look at all the professionals out there-- including but not limited to teachers and administrators-- who are simply BAD at their jobs. "Overqualified" on paper doesn't indicate anything about whether a person can or will do a halfway decent job if hired.
     
  6. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    True czacza. I definitely have respect for those who are interviewing me. And the part I said about resorting to a lower level job, that's not said to disprespect what they do, but hey, if we went to school &/or used to work a higher level job in the past, we certainly DESERVE to get a higher job, but of course we don't always get our way. My main point is that DUE TO THE ECONOMY, we can't always get the job we're qualified for since times are tough.

    Remember, czacza w/ this thread & many others I start, just because I say something, doesn't mean I personally think that certain thing I'm saying. You seem to always think that's how I believe too.

    MrsC, actually yes. From this 1 district since they're short on SLPs like most districts are. But, I don't claim to know it all by any means. Throughout the yrs, I've only did the speech therapy w/the kids. Due to not having the license for it yet, I technically can't handle any of the IEP or assessment aspects of the job...HOWEVER districts are so desperate for SLPs, they hire people all the time who haven't graduated yet, but they learn while on the job. I just started grad school, so I don't want to bog myself down too much. I'll have to do that soon enough.

    I don't think I'm ready for that yet. I want to do a good job. I don't want to say, "Well, I'll wing it just so I can get the good salary quicker." I don't know how much support the district is willing to have IF I did this. I sure don't want to just be "thrown to the wolves". After all, this is legal stuff we're talking about (IEP, assessments, typing reports, what to say at IEP mtgs, etc.)


    True Alice. As we know, a LOT of teachers have been teachers for yrs & yrs, but don't always want to be principals for example, even though they could probbly do the job.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Words mean things, Ms I. Say what you mean, mean what you say.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I'm sorry, but now I'm very confused.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    That's not my point.

    What I meant was that "overqualified" on paper doesn't necessarily translate into "right for the job."

    Those qualifications are just the very first step in a long process of finding the right person.
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Could you simply explain to them that you haven't been trained on IEP's or assessments, and ask how much support you would have to complete these things? If they know you're not licensed yet, they probably assume you don't know everything about the job.

    For what it's worth, I went into my special ed job last year knowing nothing about writing IEPs or leading meetings. My college program was wonderful, but 95% of our teaching classes were focused on gen ed teaching. We were supposed to do some things with IEPs in our student teaching, but the school I student taught at did all of their meetings in late May when I had already left and graduated. I'd never written an IEP or lead an IEP meeting when I got my job. In fact, I'd only even been to one IEP meeting, and it was in middle school and the parent didn't show up- so they basically all just signed the papers. I felt like I absolutely had no idea what I was doing when I walked in there last year (you guys are probably lucky I didn't know about this board yet, haha- I would have had about 200 stupid question posts). Our SLP was a 2nd year and she was actually the one that helped me through the IEP and my first meeting. She had a meeting before I did, so she let me sit in on her meeting so I could see how she normally ran them before I had to do one by myself. I found that I didn't have as many questions about IEPs as I thought I would- I really picked up what they were supposed to be like just from constantly reading through all of my students' IEPs. Honestly, I felt like it was pretty easy to pick up, and it wasn't something I really struggled with this year. In fact, in my final evaluation my P complimented me on how professional and empathetic I was with parents in meetings, and how I was such a good "detail person" with getting every little thing on the IEP's done correctly. Personally, I feel like if you know how to teach the kids the paperwork is something you'll learn over the year. I felt so unprepared, but found I knew so much about just working with kids/teaching in general that I really was prepared for the majority of my job. If you ask and they tell you there will be some support with teaching you how to do the paperwork, I wouldn't hesitate to take the job.

    ETA: Our district is absolutely desperate for SLP's right now. They're short TWO full time positions, and even last year when those positions were all full the SLP's were stretched extremely thin. I have no idea what they're going to do- teacher work days start next week! I think they'd jump at the chance to get someone that knew how to work with the kids but just needed a little support with writing IEP's.
     
  11. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Well, czacza seems to automatically think that because I said what I did, that it means I don't respect those people. I don't think that at all.
     
  12. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    My principal is a graduate of the school and will be overseeing many of his teachers. So far no one seems the feel the least bit worried about it. I never worry about being overqualified. I just worry about finding the job that is right for me with the amount of support I need. Obviously as a new teacher I am in need of quite a bit of support and have found the most wonderful school with a great staff. Even the elementary teachers are offering me tons of support and advice.

    I am also confused as to not saying what you mean? I always say what I mean or I will say something like "so and so said but I disagree because... What do you think?"
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Words convey meaning. So glad to hear you don't mean what your words seemed to imply. As a SLP candidate, I'm sure you value words and language...so you should understand why one would take you "at your word".
     
  14. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    I understand what you mean. There is absolutely nothing wrong with subbing or working at Starbucks, however, at this point I would be "resorting" if I did either of those two jobs because I didn't get a masters degree, three endorsements, or an online learning graduate certificate just to do jobs I did without any of that.

    I don't read "overqualified" as "too good for the job." But I definitely would prefer to do a job that challenges my skills and makes the most of them. Anything less is settling, however good a job it may be.

    I didn't notice any disrespect implied in OPs question.
     
  15. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    waterfall, if I still plan to go on this other interview w/ this dist, I'm planning to definitely talk it all over w/ them about getting support, etc.

    Our dist has been short on SLPs for the last decade or more. There was a time when they were even searching out-of-state for SLPs. Oh, if only I was ready right NOW! Oh well, my time will come!

    Thanks mollydoll.
     
  16. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    There is on the job training. Districts will get you the training that you need because not getting that training could cost them a law suit since an IEP is a legal document. I would not let not having experience stop me if I ultimately wanted to do something. We all start out with zero experience.

    The thing is graduate school prepares you for a lot of things. However, do not assume that it will truly prepare you for the day to day happenings that you will encounter on a job. As much as you have looked and waited this summer, I am surprised that you are not overjoyed and taking the position. You were offered a position, right?

    Now, having said all that... I do think that you know yourself better than anyone. What is your ultimate goal? Is it to be an SLPA or an SLP? I respect whatever decision you make. ;) The main thing is that you do what is right for you and what makes you happy. I am just asking for clarification. No judgement here.:)
     
  17. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

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    Oh geez, the things some people resort to nitpicking. It was pretty clear to me Ms. I was saying that she was qualified for certain jobs, but was using this opportunity as an SLPA to learn on the job. And anyone who's been on the board long enough knows Ms. I likes to post random and interesting topics, which I appreciate, even if I don't necessarily agree with the content of all the topics.

    Back to the post. My current job I am not overly qualified for, but took a step back (and huge pay cut) to get where I ultimately want to be in my career. Even the district administration hiring me "questioned" why I was taking this path. They even questioned why I would take such a drastic pay cut. My dad, who has his Doctorate, hit a rough time and applied to jobs he was well overqualified for. He didn't get many jobs because of the fact that he was overqualified. It's not an attitude of being " better than", but there are many situationsvwhere people take on jobs they are overqualified for, based on job descriptions.
     
  18. ciounoi

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    On paper, I am very overqualified for many jobs (3289042 teaching certificates and an MA degree). However, I would be uncomfortable teaching a certain age group. Since I am special ed, I often get calls to interview for jobs working with this age group. The interviewers can usually tell that I'm uncomfortable and don't put me forward to the next interview. I am very qualified for those positions, it's just that I'm not the right person.

    Also, if you gave me enough money to live on and gave me my pick of a job, I'd probably want to work as a special ed para. I'd be overqualified, but I LOVE the work. :)
     
  19. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    Ok... I think that the OP and the people that are questioning are not guilty of anything. I think that "written conversation" is often misunderstood. Take most of what is written on the boards as they are intended. The boards are a chit chat conversation and not a controversial debate.

    I have read some crazy things on this board this summer. And I realize that the OPs never intend to start up debate, they just wanted to start up a conversation.
     
  20. Mrs.SLF

    Mrs.SLF Comrade

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    :agreed:
     

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