Overly Qualified... Explain this to me

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by McKennaL, Aug 27, 2009.

  1. McKennaL

    McKennaL Groupie

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    Aug 27, 2009

    When people (in my world here) talk to me and ask if I got a job...and I answer with no... they automatically go to, "Well, they see that you are overly qualified."

    First - since these people don't know me well enough to truly KNOW me professionally...i take it that that's their way of being nice and having SOMETHING to say after an ackward moment.



    But...

    It brings me to this. What IS the problem with being OVERLY QUALIFIED? I'm going to put on my imaginary administrator's vest...and think about things. Especially in THIS year...with SO many qualified teachers seeking MY instructional assistant position out. Why WOULDN'T I want to give it to some-one who is an out of work literacy specialist or reading coach? Why WOULDN"T I want a person with 10 years of teaching experience - but who isn't picked up by another district as long as THEY understand that the salary is set?

    What is the problem with overly-qualified?

    (Some-one might say...you intimidate them. Intimidate them? If a person is willing to bow down and take what they could find...what is intimidating? - That's like some-one saying...you aren't dating because you are too good looking for those men. What??

    There isn't going to be some sort of a classroom coop. I'm not some crazed miltia going to capture the hearts adn minds of their students. So what would the fear be?)
     
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  3. MrsA

    MrsA Rookie

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    Aug 27, 2009

    McKenna, I have been wondering the same thing. Obviously if someone is over-qualified for the job they've applied for, they are willing to take a pay cut! They WANT the job! Heck, maybe that is the applicant's dream job.

    I really dislike the term, "over-qualified" anyway. How can you be too qualified for a job? Isn't it better to look at it as "very experienced"?
     
  4. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Aug 27, 2009

    I agree and don't get it too. When I apply for a job like an aide position, I understand what that means. I'm not stupid. I get that I won't make as much or that I won't have the luxury of being in charge of the classroom. But, maybe that's what I want!!! And, maybe I will be an awesome aide!??
     
  5. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Aug 27, 2009

    I asked this years ago, way back before I even graduated becuase teaching jobs back then were even looking pretty bad. I never really got an answer. Well, I heard text book presenter. But, how in the world do you get into that?

    Really, I have no clue what else I could do with an education degree. I know some people with an education degrees can work for an outdoor school like on a boat, or a science museum, or one of those outdoor school camps.
     
  6. Dzenna

    Dzenna Groupie

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    Aug 27, 2009

    When an employer hires an over-qualified person, there is always the risk that person is "still looking" after he is hired and will leave as soon as higher level, better paying job is offered to him. It is costly and time consuming for an employer to train an employee to have him leave quickly.
     
  7. BerniceBobs

    BerniceBobs Comrade

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    Aug 27, 2009

    I am sorry, I think I told you that you that some over-employers might think you're over-qualified.
    I thought maybe they were afraid you'd move on after something better comes along.
     
  8. dmbfan36

    dmbfan36 Rookie

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    Aug 27, 2009

    :yeahthat:
     
  9. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Aug 27, 2009

    Yep. When I worked at Blockbuster in high school, they never wanted to hire people obviously not going to want to stay. The manager was herself looking for a job in her field of economics (she had worked her way up as she went from high school into college) and she sympathized with people in her situation who needed a job, but she said she also needed to try to find people who would stay at least a year; if she had a lot of people leaving on her, HER job would have been in jeopardy. It costs so much more to train people for education jobs, that I'm sure there is pressure on P's to really try to hire people they can reasonably expect will stay for at least 3 yrs. If they start hiring aides who want teaching positions, they could end up with an aide exodus, which would not look good for THEM.


    My dad heard this more than his fair share too after he retired from the Air Force.
     
  10. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Aug 27, 2009

    I know at my old school, the P only liked to hire newbies because he felt someone with a lot of experience would be "set in their ways". Silly huh? Their ways might be very good. Guess he never thought of that!
     
  11. McKennaL

    McKennaL Groupie

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    Aug 28, 2009

    I think it has to do with character.

    As Alice recently mentioned, and as I MUST agree...I keep looking until I give my word and sign a contract. After that point... you have me for the year/length of the contract. PERIOD!

    ***

    You TRY To get this across at the interviews. You are a person of character. You have experience, but you are willing to TAKE the lower job and pay.

    I find that in lower leveled jobs...they aren't asking me if me WHY I would want this position - which is lower than I should be getting (only ONE principal honestly put it.."I know this is not what you went to college for...and you were aiming higher...but might you consider... the ONLY reason i turned this down was that it would cost more in gas to GET there-for THAT position- than it would pay), but instead they are asking:

    How would you work with these other teachers (reading between the lines: collaborate with teachers who you might know as much as -or more than- but who are above YOU in this distrcit)? And what if you saw a teacher doing something with a child - educationally- that you disagreed with?

    For the first i generally say that it boils down to COMMUNICATION and respect. That I might suggest something when and IF the opportunity arises..and IF I were asked. That I meet with teachers to find out THEIR plans/suggestions of adaptations/and their goals...the again to report how the child did in the lesson - both successes and failed attempts - each progression of the way. I would be sure to meet with them (and be available for meeting) at any request.

    And for the second... I say that unless what is happening is putting the child in some sort of risk situation, I would tread respectfully into the situation. If the teacher seems frustrated, i might ask if there is something i could help with (sometimes giving them a break, or sitting next to the child to aide the child in DOING the task asked - and then LATER discuss what had happened...asking if there was something they would like/have liked me to do, and IF I would have insight as to something that the teacher might NOT have known (that I WOULD HAVE through my 1on1/small group work with the child - or in my observations of their work). But again... it's COMMUNICATION and respect.

    Of course, you like the answer that you give/or you wouldn't GIVE it... but to me...THOSE answers are a sign that I KNOW my position/place. Overly qualified or not!

    (I just don't know what more I can do.)
     

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