Out of State Teaching

Discussion in 'General Education' started by CatfaceMeowmers, Jul 14, 2014.

  1. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Jul 14, 2014

    So I am in the MAT Program in Arkansas. I started summer 2013 and my internship is this fall 2014. Unlike many graduate students, I am being placed and have not secured a teaching position (because you can get a provisional licence and teach while you're in the program). Well, one main reason why I did not secure a job was because after I graduate, I will be moving to Oregon.

    I have looked at the requirements for out-of-state teachers in Oregon and believe I am perfectly fine when it comes to teaching, but I think I will have to take some tests for Oregon license.

    My main question is if anyone else has had troubles or problems, or even tell me your success story of being an out-of-state teacher.

    I am a bit nervous about finding a job in Oregon immediately after moving. I will begin applying in November, but I will still be in Arkansas. Any tips or suggestions? Thanks! :D
     
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  3. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I have done it twice. Sort of.

    In 2007, I decided to move from MI to NC. I did not get my NC license started prior to moving, but they had a LOT of positions open at the time, so it really didn't matter. I went down for two interviews in June (one was a district job fair). Impatiently, I started sending out mass quantities of my resume again. I lined up one interview in July. Then I contacted all the schools via email to try to set up more interviews. I ended up with 6. I didn't go on them all because I was offered my job on the spot at the second school. Licensing for me was easy- I simply had to write a check. MI has pretty tough requirements. I moved down in August 2007 and I really enjoyed the area and my school. If I could have gotten my family to move there, I would have stayed. Teaching conditions and pay are pretty bad in NC though.

    In 2012, I decided to start trying to move back to MI. I had a few interviews. I had to drive up twice, I believe. The market is tight in MI. I spent the 2012-2013 school year focusing on ways to improve my resume. In 2013, I responded to over 300 job postings. I had over 30 first round interviews. If you factor in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th rounds, I went on over 50. If you get bored, you can read my journey here. The market depends on the area, but it is not uncommon for districts to get thousands of applicants per position. One district I interviewed with last year had over 6000 applicants for their elementary positions. They interviewed 216. I made it into the hiring pool, so I was happy with that. I drove up in March, May, and then permanently in June. I ended up taking a terrible job, quitting, being a long term sub, and eventually finding a mid year job with a 180 mile daily commute. This summer I only sent out about 5 applications and received interviews from the first two. (Haven't heard about the other three yet.) I was already offered a job 5 miles from my house.

    Basically, it takes work and determination, but it is not impossible. My best advice is to take anything, then work on getting your dream job once you are there and teaching. I'm still not in my dream job, but I should be able to work here for a few years before trying again.
     
  4. OneBerry

    OneBerry Comrade

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    Jul 14, 2014

    I went through this process (in different states than you) and it was a difficult time for me. Getting my new license took six months, even though I didn't need to complete any additional courses or testing. I didn't anticipate that at all. There were very few job openings where I was moving to, I had no connections, and my new license ended up chopping a grade level off of what I am licensed to teach. It was all very frustrating. I ended up being blessed with a part time position and by the end of the year I was teaching in the district (different building) full-time. A few years later, I am happily still in that same district. I guess my only advice is to apply for your new state's license as soon as you can and hound them until you get it. Apply for everything and accept whatever you can get if it's a difficult market. Good luck!
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jul 14, 2014

    Will you have an Arkansas license before you move to Oregon?
     
  6. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    You could write a book, giraffe!

    I admire your determination! :hugs:
     
  7. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I'm pretty sure no one would read it :lol:

    Had I known how dramatic it would be, I would have started up a blog. Could have made some money. Darn!
     
  8. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Yes

    Yes, I will graduate in December and plan to move either February or March :)
     
  9. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    As long as you already have a valid out-of-state teaching license, I doubt you'll run into many problems trying to get a new license in another state.
     
  10. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    I know I'll be able to get an initial license, but after 18 months I will need to have all of Oregon's requirements complete. I am not sure if this means I will need to take the ORELA middle school math tests or not. I know some schools are desperate for teachers, so as long as you have a valid license, they won't mind.
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    A valid Oregon license.
     
  12. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I went to school in OH and got my first job in CO. I've been here for going on five years now. I didn't have to take any additional tests or anything. I had take "new teacher induction" which is the requirement for any first year teacher in CO, so I would have had to do that regardless. I don't know anything about Oregon, but my advice would be to research the requirements and apply the very first second that you can to avoid any hassles. In OH my license came in about 3-4 weeks, in CO it takes a minimum of 6 months. I was not aware of that ahead of time, and although it worked out I had some very stressed out moments!
     
  13. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    This isn't true for the most desirable markets, pretty much anywhere in the northwest corner of the state. There are districts that really need teachers, but these are the more rural areas in southern and eastern Oregon. Oregon, especially the greater Portland area, can be a very hard place to find a job. If you have an ESL, reading, or SPED endorsement, this will help you greatly. If you can teach academic content in another language, it will also be a huge asset, although not a necessity. Many large districts in the Portland Metro area are looking for teachers that can teach elementary immersion classes in Russian, Mandarin, or Spanish. Many people have to sub for a few years to be hired. I don't mean to be a downer, but am hoping this information might be helpful. It shouldn't be a problem to be applying for your license; Oregon licensure is ridiculous and takes months, but as long as you have a valid license and have applied for an Oregon one, you should be okay. What part of the state are you thinking of?
     
  14. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    Jul 14, 2014

    Good Luck. I moved from Ohio to South Carolina and had no problem transferring my license. As another poster said, I would transfer it as soon as possible. By the time school started my first year down here I had my South Carolina license as I had applied for it early. Some of my coworkers had issues though because they didn't have their license so they were not technically highly qualified in South Carolina.
     
  15. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    I am actually looking into the Medford area. My husband's family is from California, but I do not want to live in California. I know the easy route would just to stay in Arkansas and teach, but there is no way that's happening.

    I am worried about the job market =/ I've heard lots of teachers are having problems in OR, as well as finding a job...:(
     
  16. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Looking through old forum posts, I'm so discouraged now from getting an OR license and finding a job EVER... :(
     
  17. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 14, 2014

    I won't say it will be easy - but even Southern California's teacher job market, which has been notoriously tight since 2006, is easing noticeably. In addition, you're not targeting metro Portland, with its superfluity of ed schools, but rather Medford, and probably neighboring Central Point. You might find opportunities in other parts of the Southern Oregon Education Service District (SOESD), which includes Jackson, Klamath, and Josephine counties.

    Do as much work as possible in advance. You might start by getting in touch with people at SOESD to find out from a live person what it is that you need to do. I don't recall offhand whether Oregon has a distinct middle-school math license; if it does, you'd want to ask whether your Praxis test can be accepted in lieu. If Praxis isn't accepted, taking Oregon's tests may be easier than it looks: the state's testing page may still say ORELA, but the subject-matter tests are all computer-based NESTests, which you should be able to take by appointment pretty much anywhere you can find a PearsonVUE test center.
     
  18. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    I think you'll have an easier time in Southern Oregon, especially if you are willing to be flexible with the place. Klamath Falls, Grants Pass, Roseburg, and Medford all seem to be hiring quite a few teachers. It was an area I considered for a while but decided I wanted to be closer to a bigger city. I don't know how many applicants they get for those jobs down there, but don't give up. :) I talked to one school down there who would have hired me if I had wanted the job.

    I saw your other post saying you were also considering NV. I found a job in NV very quickly and will be starting there this fall.

    ETA: Subs in Oregon also get paid very well, and many schools frequently hire their substitutes for teaching positions. So, coming in the middle of the year as a sub and getting to know schools before applying for a position for the next year could be a good option too.
     
  19. CatfaceMeowmers

    CatfaceMeowmers Companion

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    Thank you so much for the encouraging words! :love: I know it will not be easy to get a job anywhere but I seem to have this thought that I will get a job immediately when I move (before hopefully). But this may be a bit too optimistic. I am shooting for OR but I will definitely apply to NV as well as much as possible <3 TY
     

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