Orton Gillingham

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Jerseygirlteach, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Jul 2, 2013

    Okay, I'm coming off of a week of Orton training and I'm sold. Many of my students come to me with very limited decoding and encoding skills and I'm hoping this will help a lot.

    Who uses the multi-sensory methodology and what is your success rate? Do you think it is a worthwhile program? Is there any tweaking or modifications you've made that have improved learning outcomes even further? I plan on dedicating about 20 minutes a day to this - pretty much following their recommendations exactly.

    Thoughts? Opinions? :)
     
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  3. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I took the training mid year and I am in 2nd. We used a lot of red words strategies. I only really dabbled with the three part drill with one student.
    I hope to implement fully next year from day 1. 6 teachers went to the training together, and we want our P to require the whole staff to do it.
     
  4. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    I've really enjoyed it - I have personally used S.P.I.R.E. which is an OG-based program. I have found a few limitations with that site - primarily in the vocab & comprehension departments. I've never seen OG methodology as being about vocab & comprehension, though S.P.I.R.E. claims to be comprehensive in that department, so it loses a few points in that category, but I make up for it.

    Along similar lines, some teachers find decodable text pretty limiting in the comprehension department - not just in terms of activities offered by the curriculum in question, but as passages for teachers to base their own activities on.

    I also think it's great you mentioned encoding, as writing/spelling is really helpful in the decoding department (not just important for its own sake).

    Did you pick up any great quick lessons you want to share? :)
     
  5. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    I have never heard of this but am becoming interested. Are there any resources online?
     
  6. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    I'm not sure about that, but I will tell you that it's a multisensory literacy program. It was designed for dyslexic students, but can work with any students that struggle with encoding (spelling) and decoding (reading).
     
  7. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I took a very shortened version of the training my first year teaching. I found that it was wildly successful with my younger students who didn't know their letters/sounds or couldn't blend/decode at all. I never had a student that couldn't learn their letters/letter sounds this way. I had one first grader who had the most severe blending problems I've ever seen. He would literally be able to say all of the letter sounds, but not the word. For example, he would say "c...a...t" and then when asked for the word say "blue." It took awhile, but after a couple of months of doing this program he was able to blend any cvc word and was reading close to grade level by the end of the year.

    I personally found that it wasn't as effective past the beginning stages. Once I saw students' progress monitoring scores start to drop off I moved them out of the program and focused a lot more on reading with real books. For every student I did this with they made remarkable progress again once coming out of the program. My first year I was told it was "required" and I kept two of my 2nd graders in the program all year even though it was no longer successful after the first couple of months. They made almost no progress for the rest of the year. My second year my P basically told me to just do whatever I thought would work and ignore the sped director, so I moved these two girls on to a more traditional reading group. Both made over two years of progress that year. My training wasn't very long or very good, so it's possible I was doing something wrong with the later parts of the program. I also was frustrated that all of the books we had for K/1 seemed to be focused on sight words and not words that could be sounded out. So kids would be so excited that they could read with the program, but once I handed them a book they could barely read any of the words. They'd try to use the OG strategies and of course they didn't work. I'm sure someone has published some OG specific decodable books which would be great to have with the program. I think it's important for kids to be reading books too.
     
  8. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Ok. I am interested in this because I will have a group of 6 students next year who are low. This might be worth trying.
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    It is way expensive to be trained, but very much worth it.
     
  10. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    I am certified in both the initial level and advanced levels of Orton Gillingham and teach a course about it at a local university. My training involved 45 course hours for initial training and 100 hours of supervised 1:1 tutoring. It was the best professional development I ever did, and it took a year. The advanced level involved an additional 45 course hours and 300 additional hours of tutoring before I was certified.

    The reality is that 60% of kids will learn to read no matter what is used, but for those other 40% some form of phonics instruction is a must. Orton Gillingham is so successful because it's researched based and very sound instruction. It works for kids, and it works well. If children are struggling, it's essential for them.
     
  11. MrShiva

    MrShiva Rookie

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    Aug 22, 2013

    I really want to learn this OG approach and I think this will help me in my teaching career in the near future.




    tracykaliski , Is it possible to use this approach though you only learned it through internet and don't have any formal training by some professionals?
     
  12. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Aug 22, 2013

    It's possible, but if you have someone who knows how to do it and can teach you, you'd be better at it. A supervised learning process is much better, in my opinion.

    An online course is a good way to learn about orton gillingham, but I wouldn't trust it to know it well enough to tutor a child who is dyslexic.
     

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