Order to teach phonics skills?

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by Pisces_Fish, Aug 6, 2013.

  1. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Aug 6, 2013

    I'm posting in the 1st grade forum even though I teach 2nd grade because so many of the kids in my school are one or more years behind. Last year was my first year teaching 2nd. My previous experience was in 3-5. As you may have heard, the adage goes, "K-2 is learning to read, 3-5 is reading to learn." I struggled with the switch! One thing that always confused me was the order of phonics instruction. I felt like I did my lower kids a disservice because I never knew what to focus on (and in what order) to help them the most. My school has plenty of resources for phonics, but oddly, no program to help me determine what should be taught, and in what order. Do you have a resource that might help me? I'm looking for something that will help me plan, week by week (in a perfect world,) the phonics skills that should be introduced and a recommended order.
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Aug 6, 2013

    Have you seen words their way? This is a great resource to place students into phonics programs based on their spelling. While this program focuses on spelling, you can definitely use it to see the phonics growth and where to go next with your students.

    I've also used Project Read, Foundations (from Wilson), and Jolly phonics. All these have a scope and sequence that might be helpful.
     
  4. jlj

    jlj Devotee

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    Aug 6, 2013

    the ABEKA curriculum has a strong phonics. You might find a used phonics curriculum (home schools use this a lot) on line. Would be a good resource.
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Aug 6, 2013

    It's pretty typical to begin with a single highly regular CVC syllable pattern (consonant-vowel-consonant, such as BAT or KID or PUP), because the vowel in such a syllable is reliably short. This presupposes, of course, that the kids have a foundation of phonemic awareness (awareness that a word can be broken down into individual sounds that distinguish one word from another - so BAT is not CAT, and BAT is not BIT, and BAT is not BAD - and the ability to identify and manipulate these phonemes in spoken words).
     

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