Opt-Out of State Testing

Discussion in 'General Education' started by PCdiva, Apr 8, 2013.

  1. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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  3. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    I signed the petition. What a brilliant idea. I can think of dozens of ESE parents that need to tell them to take that test and @&$^@#&@where the sun @&#$^@#. ;)
     
  4. Mr.history

    Mr.history Cohort

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    There is one thing that immediately stands out about this. I'm pretty sure that part of AYP is the percentage of your students who actually sit for the exam. Does refusing to take it and having it scored this way hurt your schools results? If so then there may be more harm than good for many schools by doing this. I'm sure the parents are going to say they don't care but I'm not sure teachers should be promoting this.
     
  5. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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    I am not a classroom teacher, so it doesn't impact me directly.

    From what I read, it doesn't negatively impact the teachers other than in the case where students who would normally score 4's are not taking it at all.....bringing the teachers average score down.

    I read some peoples comments in that facebook group where principals were saying they wouldn't get state $ if they didn't take the tests, but there was no proof of this anywhere.
     
  6. Mr.history

    Mr.history Cohort

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    Not trying to be rude but if the schools get less money it may impact you more than you think. A lot of schools have really cut down on non-classroom positions and I wouldn't think getting less money would help.
    (I don't mean just you, all "extra staff" like aides, librarians, ect)


    I think the ways these tests are being used is wrong but going this route doesn't seem like a good idea. Many low income schools rely on every dollar they can get so doing this may hurt them the most.
     
  7. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Right. If this will impact teacher evaluations and funding, just because (in your words) it "doesn't impact you directly" doesn't mean it's ok to blindly support it. If you teach technology, I'm sure your budget for new technology will be affected if your school consistently misses AYP due to lack of test scores.

    I'm all for looking beyond high-stakes testing, but not if it means it could potentially impact the opportunities given to my students. :2cents:
     
  8. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    There is a small group here in Denver really pushing for this, but they don't have much support. We are already implementing pay for performance and tenure is gone. Next year they'll start implementing evaluations based on test scores and the year after that test scores will essentially decide your fate as part of a new law. Many parents who do agree that the testing isn't right don't want to opt out because they don't want to hurt the teacher's test scores (since typically these are the most involved families where kids will do well). I think it's good that people want to stand up against the test, but I would personally be horrified if my best students didn't take the test as it would likely result in me losing my job.

    ETA: Around here, the lowest performing schools receive the most funding as part of their turnaround plan, so I don't think this would affect funding.
     
  9. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    One reason I am not in favor of this is how it will affect the students. Here, for 5th graders, if you don't pass the state test, or if you have no scores because you didn't take it, you are automatically given extra math and reading classes in middle school. That means no electives. I would feel really bad for my higher level students whose parents may opt them out...
     
  10. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    So, basically all of the well-educated and active parents are planning to opt their children out of "counting" in state assessments in which worse results mean less funding for those schools? Is this is a smart way to protest?
     
  11. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    School funding should not be on the backs of our children. It is not their burden, and we shouldn't be tying money to test scores. It's very unethical IMO. I can see some pressure or bullying if a parent tries to opt out. I do think this is a start to try and protect children's well-being better, but I doubt it will help on a large scale because of the money issues.
     
  12. salemteacher

    salemteacher Rookie

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    Nope...

    NY is under NCLB waiver for Race to the Top, so AYP is not a factor for a while. There is the idea that the schools must show growth, but that doesn't take effect until 2015.
     
  13. salemteacher

    salemteacher Rookie

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    Refusal results in NO score, not a failing score. It has no effect on electives or services at all.
     
  14. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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    The schools are not getting less $, in fact if enough people 'refuse' the test, maybe next year they won't spend what is about $10,000-20,000 per school to the testing companies. (Not to mention all the subs they have to pay when the teachers are out grading the tests)
     
  15. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Texas - the Place Where it all Began - Has Had it With High Stakes Testing

    Texas is where the testing insanity began with George Bush and NCLB. Finally, after 12 years, they are seeing that it hasn't worked. Millions (if not billions) of dollars wasted and the schools are worse off now than they were before.

    Will it take 12 more years for the rest of the country to see that we are heading down the wrong road?

    Here's another MSNBC article:
    http://tv.msnbc.com/2013/04/10/high-stakes-school-testing-is-under-fire-in-texas/
     
  16. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    This is not true. Refusal results in UNTESTED. Schools that do not test 95% of their students (at least, that was the number when it all started) get a huge penalty to their AYP score. Our local high school missed the 95% target two years ago and received no score as a school as a result. That was an absolute mess for them.

    All that said I find it quite interesting that the opt-out exemption was put in originally for Conservative objectors to the federal system and is now being pushed by the opposite side for their own ends and reasons.
     
  17. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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    This is the case for New York since we have a waiver it will not effect AYP, not sure about other states.
     
  18. bison

    bison Habitué

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    I have mixed feelings about it. It definitely may hurt in the short term, but perhaps it'll help in the long run. Sometimes that's the only way you can enact major change. Or.. it could just fizzle out. I'll be interested to see what happens.
     
  19. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    That's not the general sentiment here in Texas at all. If anything more weight is being placed on test scores now than ever before. There is no talk of changing that.

    Read this article the other day about a PA school. They also say that if 95% of students don't take the test they did not make AYP.

    http://triblive.com/news/westmoreland/3775488-74/math-reading-opt

    Testing is not going to go anywhere. Even if a million parents opted out. Our system is based on data now-data to decide how to place kids, how to evaluate teachers, how to evaluate schools. I can't envision a time where it's not going to be a priority to the powers that be.
     
  20. EdEd

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    To briefly defend data, I do think it's important to clarify that a data-driven approach is by no means bad, but is actually very good. But, it requires the right kind of data and the right kind of decision-making process. Evaluation of teachers/schools via state test, to me, is inappropriate.
     
  21. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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