Opinions Wanted

Discussion in 'General Education' started by DawnR, Aug 12, 2013.

  1. hollydoris

    hollydoris Rookie

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    Aug 13, 2013

    I would just mention something in your cover letter about how you took some time off work to be a stay at home mom, there shouldn't really be a problem with that. Don't go on and on about it, but briefly mention it and they will get the idea that you haven't been working for a reason.

    My school was doing some hiring this spring and when they were looking over resumes, they were suspicious about ones that had a long period of time with no work for what appeared to be no reason. For resumes that had a period of time with no work but made it clear that it was by choice to raise kids, there was no problem there.
     
  2. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Aug 13, 2013

    I taught for 7 years and then spent 15 years as a SAHM and it did take me years to get a job. You have a different scenario though- your college education will be recent and you have a maturity that younger grads won't. I still recommend that you have as many certifications as you can - ESL, Reading, middle level to be as hirable as possible. I won't tell you that your years as a SAHM will be universally respected. I ran into several principals ( all women btw) who scoffed at those years "wasted" but many more will respect and understand. I know that I am a better teacher having been a parent. That doesn't mean that I think teachers without children are not wonderful. That's just something that's true for me. Don't be defensive about your life choices - they are yours and you'll make it all work.
     
  3. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Aug 13, 2013

    I went to college for one year out of high school, then got married, had two kids, and didn't go back to college until I was 33. It took me over SIX years to finish college (had another baby!) so by the time I got my teaching certificate I was 39! I subbed for 6 months, got a full year long term sub job, then another one which turned into a contracted position. I'm now 46 and LOVE my job!! I think it's actually illegal to hire someone based on their age, so that's a plus, and I have found that my life experiences have been a big bonus. Many parents trusted me much more than they probably would have if I had been fresh out of college at 22! Plus I had my own kids which helped me to understand the parents (and the kids) better.
     
  4. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Aug 13, 2013

    I became a better teacher as soon as I became a mom. You have that as an asset. Use it!
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 13, 2013

    I was 45 when I was hired for my first teaching job - 6 years ago! I also "took a break" from my own education to raise my daughter and help support my family. There are Principals who will appreciate that, and those who will not. I am now a "mentor teacher," and have a wonderful Principal who actually seems to appreciate me! Have faith!
     
  6. paperheart

    paperheart Groupie

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    Aug 13, 2013

    A recent study came out that suggested what factors do and do not indicate effective teachers. It is starting to turn the heads of many districts because it indicated a different picture than what has been traditional considered as important. Perhaps, in two years the study will have influenced the hiring quite a bit (perhaps, not, but food for thought either way ;))

    Here is the list.

    What makes a teacher likely to succeed:
    1. History of success (in anything)
    2. Takes full responsibility for student/school success
    3. Reflects critically
    4. Organized
    5. Motivates other
    6. Respectful
    7. Team oriented goals
    8. Teacher has high literacy herself
    9. Selectivity of college
    Overall, biggest indicator was the teacher truly feeling like she could make a difference with her students.

    What surprisingly makes no difference in overall student achievement:
    1. Masters Degree
    2. Experience
    3. Educational transcript (what courses)
    4. Traditional certification
    5. Teacher's GPA

    http://articles.washingtonpost.com/...210252_1_teachers-math-classroom-observations

    It sounds like you have a heart for teaching...It sounds like someone will see that and snatch you up.
     
  7. DawnR

    DawnR Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2013

    I have been away from the boards for a few days, so I just wanted to chime in here and say how much I appreciate all of the votes of confidence. I definitely do feel much better reading all of the motivating words. I want so bad to teach. I always have. Literally I never remember choosing another "when you grow up you want to be a....." career choice. I do feel that I can teach a child to love learning, and that in itself is life changing. At least for me it was (which would be a whole other post, haha). I practice on my own kids. :wub:

    I do feel that like a select few other professions (nursing comes to mind, or doctor, clergy etc...) teaching is a calling. I do not think that just ANYBODY can go to school and then be a successful teacher. Well, possibly... but rarely is that going to turn out well. I feel that you have to WANT TO GET IN THERE and do whatever it takes to get to the heart of the child. That is just how I feel. I get so emotional thinking about 'lost kids' - - that is what I call the ones who slip through unnoticed, who may have needed the most attention, whether academically or otherwise.:blush: Poor things, they just need someone on their side- these kids need a little more attention.

    My own kids go to a lower income school in town. We own our home on the outskirts of town, but right in town 3 miles from us are the projects. I am a student, my husband supports all of us! Let me be the first to say MONEY IS TIGHT!! However, we are probably in the top 5% ranked socioeconomically that attend. So most of the kids at this particular school are living in poverty. I wonder how many are living like that at the hands of alcoholic/drug abusing/etc parents. (and I am aware that bad choices are not always the case) I just want to be the teacher who lets the child know that they are their own person, they do not have to end up like their parents or anyone because someone else made poor choices. Obviously I cant SPECIFICALLY RIDICULE their parents to the child... but... you know what I am trying to convey here.... simply They can do whatever they want... I am living proof.
     
  8. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Aug 19, 2013

    I, too, was a SAHM- for 15 years. Then I went back to college and graduated FINALLY when I was 39. I subbed for two years and then got a contract. Have been teaching since then (I'm now 46) and LOVE it. I was, like you, worried at first, but honestly my age and experience have been nothing but an asset to my career. :D
     
  9. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Aug 19, 2013

    I think teaching is one of the few careers that does NOT look down at people in your situation, at times I think it may even be an advantage.
     
  10. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    Aug 19, 2013

    I really agree with this list, especially 1, 2, 3, and 5. Those are just huge.

    I also believe that specific teaching strategies could be listed in what makes no difference. That 1,2,3, and 5 are just that powerful.
     
  11. DawnR

    DawnR Rookie

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    Mar 19, 2014

    I am stirring up an old post here, but I wanted to revisit this one, and let you all know that I am about to transfer from the community college I am attending to the university in August. I am graduating here with membership in Phi Theta Kappa Honors Society, as well as earning a service learning degree for my volunteer work. I have been volunteering 2 days a week in a Kindergarten classroom since August 2013. We started out with one day a week, and after reading and rereading this post on this forum, I decided I wanted to bump it to two days. It may not be MUCH more time, but it was all I could do between my kids, and my school work. The teacher whom I am volunteering under will also let me volunteer next year, we have discussed this. So I will have 2 years of volunteer work in the classroom under my belt when I graduate. My next big step is my University Interview for admittance to the Education Program. I have little doubt that I will do just fine in the interview, but it is a little nerve-wracking at the same time... since I have not really interviewed for ANYTHING in what seems like forever! :)

    I am busting at the seams to get out there and into a classroom. Holding all this creativity in is killing me! haha. :)
     
  12. queenie

    queenie Groupie

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    Mar 19, 2014

    I went back to school after being a SAHM for 15 years. It took me 6 years to finish up my bachelor's degree (I was almost 40 at the time I graduated). Within 9 months of subbing I got a long term sub (all year) position followed by another one that turned into a contract. I had NO problem getting considered for a job. I actually think my age worked FOR me because people assume I have a lot of experience :lol:
     
  13. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Mar 20, 2014

    I take issue with number 8... Apart from that, I can agree.
     

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