On tomorrow

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Flanny108, Dec 9, 2008.

  1. Flanny108

    Flanny108 Rookie

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    Dec 9, 2008

    This has been driving me crazy since I started teaching in Maryland. I've noticed that instead of saying "Please turn in your paper tomorrow." Some teachers will say "Please turn your papers in on tomorrow." It seems to me that it is bad english. I thought it was just the habit of one school where I worked, but now it's happening in my new school. What do you think, is it proper english?
     
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  3. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Dec 9, 2008

    I have NEVER heard of that!

    I do know here we say standing IN line, but I have heard people from other places say standing ON line.

    That papers in/on tomorrow is just weird. Could they just be making an error as they speak, like, "please turn your papers in on (internal monologue: oh, tomorrow is the tenth!), er... tomorrow."
     
  4. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Dec 9, 2008

    They say it here too-our principal even says it - in the morning announcements. I don't like it either. The kids also drive me nuts with "on accident" - I did it "on accident". I guess "on" is just the quintessential preposition - use for any occasion.
     
  5. kilikena0310

    kilikena0310 Companion

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    Dec 9, 2008

    I have to admit, I've never heard anyone say that, and I've heard some very bad English!

    Perhaps it's regional?
     
  6. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Dec 9, 2008

    I suppose it could be a regional thing, but I'm interested in seeing what the Empress of Grammar has to say on the subject....Oh TeacherGroupie!!!!!!! :D
     
  7. Sheba

    Sheba Companion

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    Dec 9, 2008

    It's an unnecessary second preposition. We misuse prepositions like that all the time: 'outside of' instead of just 'outside'; 'off of' instead of just 'off'; 'look at here' instead of 'look here'.
     
  8. Hoot Owl

    Hoot Owl Aficionado

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    Dec 10, 2008


    It's using two prepositions in a row which is improper English. It's probably a local colloquial pattern.
     
  9. sk8enscars311

    sk8enscars311 Companion

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    Dec 10, 2008

    That is weird... What part of MD? I live in southern MD and work in DC but I taught there last year and the year before. Haven't heard anything like that.
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 10, 2008

    ("Empress of Grammar"?)

    I certainly recall the phrase on accident from my misspent youth, a hundred or so miles from where I live now - it was something one heard strictly from kids, and I always assumed it was formed on analogy with the phrase on purpose.

    ("Empress of Grammar"??)

    On tomorrow is new to me, though. The problem is not in point of fact two prepositions in a row. In the first place, the in in turn in isn't a preposition, it's a particle - that is, the verb isn't turn + prepositional phrase, it's turn in + object.

    ("Empress of Grammar"???)

    I think Miss Froggy's right as to the origin - which suggests that the people who are now saying on tomorrow may have reanalyzed tomorrow (which can function an adverb, as it does in I will do it tomorrow) as strictly and solely a noun, and one that can be the object of the preposition on just as a day of the week can.

    ("Empress of Grammar"...)

    None of which means I have to like the locution.
     
  11. Flanny108

    Flanny108 Rookie

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    Dec 10, 2008

    I am in Baltimore. It's strange that I've really only heard it said by the principals and some of the teachers. Some fo the kids have picked up on it and have started to use it. I have been quick to correct them. I am happy to see that I am right and my principal is wrong:lol:
    Perhaps when I go back to school on tomorrow I can print this out and show it to her.
     
  12. Kindergarten31

    Kindergarten31 Cohort

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    Dec 10, 2008

    I live in Florida and we had someone at our school that always said
    "on tomorrow" and it just never sounded correct to me, but other people began using it too, not me. I also find jarring is using the word "the" in front of bed. Like, "I am going home and getting in the bed". My family would always say, "I am going home and getting in bed". The first is more logical, but sounds weird to me.
    Back to "on tomorrow" You could say "turn in your papers Monday" or "turn in your papers on Monday", so why couldn't you say, "turn in your papers tomorrow" or "turn in your papers on tomorrow"???
     
  13. scholarteacher

    scholarteacher Connoisseur

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    Dec 11, 2008

    I have noticed that, too, in NC. It's definitely not a regional thing here, but seems to be prominent among a particular segment of the population. Either way, I know what they mean!
     

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