Offered a Contract?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by CareerChanger, Jul 16, 2007.

  1. CareerChanger

    CareerChanger Rookie

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    Jul 16, 2007

    Hi -

    I am doing the alternate certification route, so I have no experience teaching. I am getting my math credential. I went on my first job interview on Thursday with a nearby urban school district and was offered an employement contract right after the interview. I am really not sure what it means. The district was doing lots of interviews and there were three of us offered contracts, one person signed right away, myself and the other decided to wait - they will then email us this week and we have one week to decide whether or not to sign it. If I sign it , does that mean I am obligated to teach in that district no matter what school I end up at? Some of the schools I would not want to work at.. some are quite far away from where I live and others are in dangerous neighborhoods. Some of the schools I would really like to work in. What does a teaching contract mean??
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 16, 2007

    I think you need to stop and carefully read whatever they send you. They're all different.

    In the meantime, with a math credential, keep emailing other principals until you find a job you want.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jul 16, 2007

    Did you read the contract? It should give the terms. The contract I signed specified my school assignment, but I've seen some that don't specify a placement.

    If your contract doesn't specify a placement, then it does mean that you could be placed anywhere within the district. To be perfectly honest, depending on certain factors (the number of offers you've had, how soon school will be starting, and whether you want to teach in this district at all), I recommend going ahead and accepting the offer.

    In our district, new teachers must commit to two years at a particular school before asking for a transfer/reassignment. I was lucky to be offered a position at a school which I love... but even if I hadn't been, having a signed contract with this district would mean a foot in the door and a relatively short wait until I could move to a new one.
     
  5. Calif Student

    Calif Student Rookie

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    Jul 16, 2007

    CareerChange,

    1) There are two types of contract: temporary & probationary (for us, the newbies). Temporary implies that your position is not permanent. You may or may not have this job next year. Usually it is offered to those candidates who are not "fully credentialed", i.e. "emergency permit", "internship credential". However, if you have a "preliminary", "professional clear", or "life" credential, they typically will put you on Probationary contract instead. This is actually a better offer. According to what my tenured colleagues told me, after being put on Probationary contract for two years, upon the 3rd year, you will get some sort of Tenured contract. In orther words, you have better "job security".

    2) I used to work for a large urban school district (so large that they have to break it down to 8 local districts) and am going to work for yet another pretty big school district (it has 9 high schools, 10 middle schools & 2 continuation high schools) this upcoming Sept. The difference: In previous employment, I was interviewed directly by the site Principal. She hired me (so I knew which school I'd be reporting to). For new employment, I was interviewed at the District office, by a panel of 5-8 principals/assistant principals/dept chairs from various sites within the same district. Then one of the Principals hired me (he wasn't present at the interview; the Assistant Principal was). Therefore, I actually didn't know which school I'd be working for at the interview.

    In my previous job, I know that some people applied directly to the school site, rather than going through the District Office. It was an option. However, for my new job, it is not a valid option. Everybody has to go through the District Office.

    I certainly understand how you feel. There are definitely schools that I will NOT consider teaching in my previously District because of the neighborhood concern and the horror stories that I was told. Especially since you are a first-year teacher, you probably don't want to wind up in that kind of situation. However, because of the fact that you are new, you may not have any saying in choosing the site you'd like to work for. There is a great possiblity that they will just assign you to a particular school.

    Have you asked them which school site you will be working for?
     
  6. kdw1913

    kdw1913 Companion

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    Jul 16, 2007

    Is the contract a "letter of intent?" I was offered this from a couple of districts which garauntees employment for the school year, but does not specify placement. They all gave me a certain amount of time to accept the offer. When I signed the letter of intent with the district I wanted to go to, the district then lined up interviews for me and I got a contract specifying placement after one of the principals offered me the position at his school. I would read it carefully and don't hesitate to ask the person who offered it any questions you have.
     
  7. CareerChanger

    CareerChanger Rookie

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    Jul 17, 2007

    Thank you all for your responses! Very helpful and I think my next step is to take a deep breath and really really read the contract. The district is emailing it to me for my review. The idea of a contract for employment is a new one to me, and I am planning to call the district to clarify exactly what this contract means: Temporary? Probationary? Do I have an "out" if I end up assigned to a school that is not acceptable to me? Is it a guarantee or just a "gee, would be nice to have you" kind of thing?

    Thank you again for all the help!
     

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