NY City Teachers need advice on how to get a job please!! Catholic or Public school

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by SpringGirl14, Apr 29, 2010.

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  1. SpringGirl14

    SpringGirl14 Rookie

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    I am currently finishing my Masters in Childhood EDU general education. If I can secure a job, before September, I don't have to do student teaching, otherwise I do, which I dread because I will be out an income and only with one, my husbands. I have no teaching experience, other then working at a catholic elementary school after school program. I went to catholic school my entire life so would not mind teaching in a catholic school despite the pay cut.

    I emailed the principal of the catholic school I worked at years ago asking her if I can come up and meet with her. She told me I could meet with her but flat out said in the email that getting a job in a catholic or public school right now it nearly impossible, though there's always the chance. I was a little taken back and am now really scared that I am not going to find a job and have wasted all this money and time on nothing. She said I can some up and meet with her the end of May which I am. Another classmate suggested I just take a day off from work and go up to catholic schools handing in my resume. But with no experience, except office work that I currently do, what do I put on my resume? She got a job last year at a Catholic school with no teaching experience or degree because she knew someone. Also, just showing up at schools seems risky to me. Can anyone suggest how I can get a teaching job in a catholic, private , public (there is stilla freeze) or any school at this point? Or should I just do my student teaching and wait until I graduate, next December, WHICH IS WORSE BECAUSE IT'S MID YEAR!!! Please any suggestions from teachers or soon to be? This is in NY City and I will teach in Brooklyn, Staten Island, Queens or Manhattan.
     
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  3. teacher36

    teacher36 Comrade

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    A lot of people are in the same boat. Unfortunately, I think you will need to do your student teaching to gain experience. But even with that, it may not be enough. I have a Masters Degree, I did student teaching and I have 2 years experience as a Universal Pre-K teacher in NY and still cannot find a full time job for next year. The economic climate is terrible, especially for teachers. In NY,not only is there a hiring freeze but many districts are laying off very experienced teachers because they cannot afford their salaries. After you do your student teaching and you receive your degree, you may have to sub a lot to get known in the districts before you get a full time job. Also, you may make a great impression in the school that you student teach in and they may look to hire you for the future. Good luck, I know how much it hurts to lose a salary, but keep in mind that teaching is worth the effort!!
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Apr 29, 2010

    I agree. It's a rough job market out there, especially for elementary ed. In the metro NYC area, it always has been.

    And new teachers do student teaching for a reason-- there's that safety net of a cooperating teacher as you learn how to teach. Schools would prefer that teaching candidates have had student teaching so that they have some idea of both classroom management and of the appropriate way to present material so the kids will understand. Also, it's hard to anticipate the little things-- how much information to put into a lesson, how long to make a test, how often to quiz, and so on, without the practice of student teaching. Student teaching is IMPORTANT-- that's why they want you to do it. Teaching isn't something you can learn to do by being a student. And schools don't want to gamble away a year of education for 25 or 30 kids on an adult who has never been in front of a classroom before.

    During my student teaching, I waitressed nights to cover my tuition. Was it ideal? No. But it got the bills paid. And I spent 6 years as a SAHM, living off my husband's Catholic High School salary, supplemented by photography, freelance writing and tutoring. Six years got to be rough for us; 6 months would be doable, even with 3 kids.


    As an aside, to be quite frank, I was a little put off that you "would not mind" teaching in a Catholic school. I've done so my entire professional career, and don't see it as a sacrifice.
     
  5. SunnyReader

    SunnyReader Companion

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    Apr 29, 2010

    I agree with Alice. As someone employed by the Archdiocese of NY, I am a little offended. No one in my catholic school sees this as a standby til they receive a better job offer.

    However, for next year, we had to layoff 3 teachers. Good luck.


    Everyone else has to suck it up and do student teaching...do the same. You might just learn something.
     
  6. eri444

    eri444 Rookie

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    Apr 29, 2010

    I'm in NY too and am not in the financial situation to postpone looking for a job post-September. My undergrad is in business (online marketing), where I have a decent network, and that is where I plan to go back to if I can't get a job by September. Unfortunately, I hated Corporate America, so I really hope I can secure one somewhere.

    I don't know anything about general education, but what NYS teaching certificate are you receiving that does not require student teaching? I thought all Initial Certificates required it unless you were getting an alternative certification (Teaching Fellows)?
     
  7. eri444

    eri444 Rookie

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    Apr 29, 2010

    And just to defend SpringGirl14, I don't think she was trying to offend anyone regarding her comment about private schools. I'm not saying all private schools are like this, but I've done some research into the compensation and benefits package at some private schools, and they just cannot compete with those of the public sector in both salary and even more importantly, retirement pension. (Again, not all private schools, just some). Some private schools are paying salaries that are about 50% of what some teachers are making their first year in NYC (which is about 46k or 47k) and have benefits nowhere near as good. Obviously, there are perks in private schools - don't get me wrong - I just don't think SpringGirl14 was trying to offend anyone by making it seem that she was 'settling' for a private school. And again, in this economy, we can't afford to be picky, but some of us can't afford to live on the salaries they are offering, picky or not :2cents:
     
  8. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Apr 29, 2010

    I am pretty sure it's too late to apply to the public school system in NYC. So stick with the private schools.

    You can put your after-school program work down as experience. It's not much but it helps.

    My best suggestion would be to find out if you can fulfill your student teaching with an assistant teacher job. It's pretty much the same as being a student teacher just with a paycheck (at least for me it was. I was a TA first and had to quit to do ST because of a school policy. It was torture, same work/no pay). With no experience and no degree yet, you're more likely to get this than a full teaching position and that can be good experience when you're ready to move on.

    Just doing your student teaching is not such a bad option. It's not as good as having a job but it gives you more time to focus on finishing school. Mid-year is not an easy time to look for teaching jobs but not impossible - especially if you're willing to sub around a bit, which can give you exposure for when you apply for full positions for September.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Apparently you didn't research mine. Or my husband's.
     
  10. SunnyReader

    SunnyReader Companion

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    Apr 29, 2010

    What graduate program is this that allows no student teaching?
     
  11. SunnyReader

    SunnyReader Companion

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    it is not too late for NYC....but they have a hiring freeze and definitely would not be interested in someone without a degree
     
  12. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Wow. So much to say...
    1. The economy/budget cuts have many experienced teachers in the market looking for jobs in education- public, private, charter. You will be in competition for jobs against teachers who are excellent, have experience and are fully certified. What was a tough market is now VERY tough. I'd say do the student teaching.

    2. Working at a Catholic after school program is not teaching. It is not teaching experience, although you could put it on your resume as 'related experience'.

    3. Take the good advice from the principal who KNOWS you. Jobs are tight. There are hundreds of resumes for every education opening- in all kinds of schools. You will not be even considered in most schools since you are not fully certified without student teaching...

    4. You have not wasted money and time. You have gotten an education. Finish it by student teaching and being fully licensed. Your student teaching will count as 'experience' since you have no other real educational experience that counts.

    5. Taking a catholic school job is not a 'pay cut' when you have no job. There are plenty of teachers/teacher candidates out there right now who have done their student teaching who are willing to sub, take para/aide jobs, work in schools that don't pay as well as others to 'get their feet in the door'...these people are your competition.

    No one said this was going to be easy. There are no shortcuts. :2cents:
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I responded on your other post...it's best to post in only one forum.

    PS...you will have a graduate degree (costs districts MORE to hire you) and NO experience...not a good combination...
    Do the student teaching and apply everywhere once you are fully licensed. You are in competition with many many excellent and experienced professional educators.
     
  14. eri444

    eri444 Rookie

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    I agree - like I said there are some out there that pay well, but you cannot argue that as a whole, private schools offer compensation/benefits packages similar to public schools. The higher paying private schools will probably be just as competitive as some of the higher paying public school districts (i.e. Manhasset in Long Island which is starting a 1st year teacher next year with only a BA at about $60,000, a salary that subsequently jumps up to the mid 70s once a Master's is received, with a 25-30 year top salary of $140k. That salary, coupled with overtime, extracurricular activities, could guarantee a retiree in that district over 100k a YEAR in pension for life until death. Not to mention, they have developed, also, the 55/25 plan which enables a teacher to receive full pension benefits at age 55 with 25 years in the district. If you live till 85, that's a pension of 3 million dollars). To save that type of money with a private 401k is near impossible on a teacher's salary. Again, I know this is the extreme of the public school sector's salaries, but your private school, I'd imagine, is also the extreme of the private school salaries, as there are tons of private schools in NY, including St. Mary's, Buckley Day School, and other schools located in wealthy wealthy areas that simply do not pay anywhere near these amounts or provide benefits like these. Of course, I have a better chance at getting hit by lightning than getting a position at Manhasset School District, but still :p

    Anyway, I'm not trying to argue that there aren't high paying private schools, I was just trying to defend the fact that she wasn't 'trying' to make private schools seem like a terrible thing. I'm sorry if I offended anyone in doing so :dizzy:
     
  15. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    What I can, and will continue to argue, is that if you "would not mind" teaching in a Catholic school, or in any other setting, perhaps it's better to look elsewhere. There are lots and lots and lots of other qualified professionals like myself, my husband, and our colleagues, who consider it a privilege.
     
  16. jforegolf

    jforegolf Rookie

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    A good site to check out for private school jobs in NYC is www.nysais.org. This is the site for the New York State association of independent schools. This site has a bunch of private schools located in NYC advertising for job openings and some would likely be willing to hire someone who has not student taught since they are private and don't need to hire fully certified teachers. I work for one of these schools and really love the school I'm at. A lot of the Independent private schools in NYC are great and a great place to start your career.

    It is tough to break into the field right now. I work for one of the schools advertising openings on this site and we were told that they had a record number of applicants this year. However, right now is peek hiring season for my school and given the economy this is not surprising. I hope this helps and best of luck with the job search!
     
  17. jforegolf

    jforegolf Rookie

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    I responded to the original posters question in the same thread title in the General Education section. Hope that post is helpful to people looking for Teaching jobs in NYC.
     
  18. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Alice, I actually read a completely different tone in that particular statement. It's like saying, "I wouldn't mind teaching anything from "K-3" but not anything over that. "I wouldn't mind teaching anything from K-3" but my experience is in K-1. It's okay to have a preference for public schools because you perceive the pay to be better (and often it is) than catholic schools but yet be okay with getting a job there too because the OP has experience growing up in that environment and can relate. In this case I think there are some different interpretations of that phrase Alice and that's part of reading stuff over the internet.

    My advice to the op is to do your student teaching and be willing to relocate.
     
  19. SpringGirl14

    SpringGirl14 Rookie

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    I really didn't think that putting "would mind" would offend so many people lol. And I never put in my post that I was going to teach in a Catholic school while I wait to work in a Public. I attended Catholic School my entire life and plan on sending my children to Catholic as well and beleive in the education children receive in a Catholic school. By "don't mind" I mean a ton of people will tell you they WILL NOT work in a Catholic school because of the drasitc pay cut. I know many people who started at Catholic Schools because it was easier to get a job there verses a Public and eventually left because of the pay. I never said that in my post..
     
  20. SpringGirl14

    SpringGirl14 Rookie

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    The program I am in. There are also at least 5 other schools I can name who work with public schools to allow you finish your master's while you work as a teacher. I looked into those schools, but the tuition is too high. My program, you student teach, or you get a full time job as a teacher, where you are observed by a professor at the school a few times a semester and you pass or fail. It's consider a class and in lue of student teaching.
     
  21. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    This thread is now closed.
     
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