Note taking lesson plan

Discussion in 'High School' started by inlovewithwords, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. inlovewithwords

    inlovewithwords Companion

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    Sep 8, 2007

    Hi! I'm teaching exreme struggling readers and writers. I need to teach them how to properly take notes. I need a lesson that is going to at least try to get them interested. Does anyone have some lessons or activities to show them HOW to take good notes?
     
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  3. cindyw625

    cindyw625 Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2007

    Well, I'm in first grade, but I know a website note taking tool that you can incorporate into a lesson plan or perhaps just print it out.

    The website is: http://www.readwritethink.org. There, you click on student materials and go down the list to the "ReadWriteThink Notetaker." There are lesson plans there for grades 9-12. They provide the link to open the notetaker tool (which requires Flashplayer). I think you might find it helpful.

    It this helps!
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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  5. kilgore_trout

    kilgore_trout Rookie

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    May 5, 2008

    I use a guided note-taking system kind of like Cornell notes, but with more scaffolding. I use handouts for it, too. What we do is this: the students take notes on what they hear/see/read. There's then a specific section for them to connect their own feelings/experiences and to brainstorm possible connections to other literature/classes/things they've learned in class.

    This doesn't help initially in discerning what information to include or exclude from the notes. It does immediately help with engagement, however, and in making the note-taking seem relevant (at least in my experience). As the students get more practice in making connections across their experiences, it also eventually helps them learn to anticipate what kind of information will be most meaningful to record.

    My particular experience is with ELL students (I was an ESL tutor before I started student teaching). Providing this place for my students to explicitly include their own experiences really helped, especially with my students who were frustrated by the difference in ability between their first language and English.
     
  6. Miss L

    Miss L Rookie

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    May 7, 2008

    I remember my freshman college teacher did this to us (it has always suck with me). She told us she was going to tell us a short story. We were to take notes as we normally would for a class lecture. She told us a funny story involving her and a sheep when she was on a vacation in England (I don't remember ALL the details...I just know we were all laughing and hanging on her every word) Of course, the story was full of main points that were important as well as supporting details (some being important - some not so important)

    She then broke down her OWN story she had just told and explained to us the different parts (main idea - main topic - point of the story, etc.) It made us realize that a lot of times we completely miss the whole point on something or OTHER times (and this was what I was doing) we actually take way too MANY notes that are mostly irrelevant and just end up confusing us. It was interesting to see how we have to train ourselves to get through the "fluff" of information to get to the heart of the matter

    (sorry if that all sounds vague - after rambling I realized this might not even make sense)
     
  7. MrsLilHen

    MrsLilHen Comrade

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    May 11, 2008

    I teach sixth grade and we do a cool activity called "cut apart the text" where students actually cut the important parts of the text and glue them down. You can also give cut parts of an article and have them put them together. I think both activities really are powerful intros to note taking.
     

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