Not sure about public school education in years to come

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by TeacherCuriousExplore, Jan 31, 2017.

  1. TeacherCuriousExplore

    TeacherCuriousExplore Cohort

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    Not trying to get into politics, but I am curious to know how does everyone feel about public school education in the next four years. Will their be jobs and will students benefit from education under the new administration
     
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  3. Secondary Teach

    Secondary Teach Companion

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    I know public education will be around forever. While I do acknowledge that elearning and etutoring are becoming popular, they can never replace the public education system. And what about the families that don't have housing or ready access to technology to enroll their children in eschools? What about the families that don't believe homeschooling is very rigorous? What about families who want their child to go to school to socialize? So with these issues and more, I don't see public education going anywhere ever. Nor, do I see private schooling going anywhere anytime soon.
    :)
     
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  4. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I'll just say I'm glad to be leaving at the end of this year.
     
  5. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I don't anticipate major changes, in spite of all the rhetoric in the news.

    It has been my experience that most parents choose status quo, even if offered other alternatives. For example, they will choose convenience, rather than going out of their way to change something (like their child's school).

    For example, in this area, students can go to a school of their choice, as long as parents provide transportation to a school other than their home school, and there is room in the school. In a school district of 65,000+ students, less than 1000 parents requested a change.

    I anticipate the same scenarios if the present administration changes much education policy.
     
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  6. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Special education in small town USA. Yeah, I'll have a job.
     
  7. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    I happen to be very pro-charter, pro-private, pro-homeschooling, pro-public schooling, really whatever you feel you need to do to get your kid a solid education. I agree, I think there is more fluff than real action that will happen. There just won't be enough pressure to significantly affect the state of public education.
     
  8. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Yes, I'm very worried. My area already has a version of "school choice," and we've already seen negative impacts in low SES schools. The "choice schools" are allowed to deny enrollment to out of district students if they have attendance or behavior issues. They also can deny enrollment for students who have IEPs. My districts HS has gotten to the point of being 40% SPED students (this % has grown every year), because the students who can are going to neighboring wealthy districts while struggling students are stuck. Parents definitely can and do move their kids in my area. Just in my school alone, we have over 100 students who open enrolled in my school from nearby districts that are even lower SES than ours. There is a big issue with public schools "courting" athletes at the high school level, and there is always drama over the highest performing (wealthiest) schools "capping out" on open enrollment and denying everyone. Meanwhile, charters are popping up everywhere to take on the overflow. They can also deny students based on poor attendance, poor behavior, IEP status, or low academic performance and many keep out low SES families by having absurd "parent participation" requirements that are impossible for working parents. Then on a political level, these schools are being compared to ours as if they were equal, and we're being asked why we're not getting the same results when we have to take everyone. I'm not sure I see a future where public schools are totally gone, but I can see a future where public schools are only for the most disadvantaged students and nearly everyone else is attending "choice schools."
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I've been teaching for 20 years. State policies affect us more than federal level politics. I'm not worried.
     
  10. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    There does seem to be an increased likelihood that control over educational policies will revert back to the states, which was the case before the Carter Administration. As I was in 3rd grade during his final year in office, I cannot give a qualified guess how that will go.
     
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  11. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Exactly. Our governor decided if we go into proration and get no instructional funds and such, not the president/federal.
     
  12. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    ,
     
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  13. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    ,
     
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  14. TeacherCuriousExplore

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    EXACTLY! I am not sure why parents will not do their research into charter schools before considering that option for educational attainment. Back in college I took a class in public school sociology where we discussed the pros and cons of charter school. Their isn't much different between those and public schools. However, unlike public schools, charter schools tend to lack quality teachers and education because their curriculum and teacher choices are based on what the parents choose. Most parents that are not educators tend to choose based on what they think is right for their child .
    I teach in a small town and their is a new charter school that opened. Parents removed their kids from the public school in high numbers. The public school is lacking teachers and also froze the hiring process
     
  15. TeacherCuriousExplore

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    Mostly in more metro areas I am seeing what you are currently experiencing. I live in a small city, but is considered metro than the district where I work. I have had conversation with teachers in the metro area where I live and they have told me that the city schools which are in town and cater to low income children tend to have a high percent of SPED students. Whereas the county schools, which cater to the wealthy tend to have a high performing rate on test scores and grades. Most of the county school are private and charter all except for the a few. Most of the city schools are public schools.

    The district where I work is rural and we are currently having a problem with child poverty, poor test scores and grades, and children not performing on the level they should be on so teachers are promoting them just so that the child can be off of their hands. I teach Pre K here and I can even tell how far behind the kids in this area is as compared to the metro area where I live at. I taught pre k in that area before I came to this job. The district that I am employed in is the same district I went to school and graduated in. I graduated 7 years ago and started school here in 1997. They are still facing the same problems almost 20 years later.
     
  16. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    ,
     
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  17. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    My state is very rigorous at keeping charter schools at the same expectations as public schools--really, the only difference is they can be a little more creative in offering certain perks at their schools and they answer to the state instead of a district. This is probably why I have such satisfaction with charter schools.

    That said... when I started at a charter school, my thought was "I don't really see a difference. Same teaching qualifications, same standards, same state expectations, we just happen to have a fancy Spanish-language program and we wear uniforms".

    I'm bugged when parents assume, without any real research, a charter school or a private school is automatically better simply by virtue of having "charter" or "private" slapped onto it. Sure, I know some people who pick them as a say to "stick it to the man", but my mentor during student teaching had taught for years at a private school and said that one had been horrible, yet parents didn't bother to find out.
     
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  18. TeacherCuriousExplore

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    Most charter schools that I am familiar with are worth a hill of beans. Those of us that are in education know it to be somewhat true, but never inform the parents. I am the type of teacher that let parents figure out the ramifications on their own.
     
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  19. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    And, really, why not? Most parents "know" all about that school and anything you say will likely be just noise to them.
     
  20. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Comrade

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    Yep, that's the experience where I live. My siblings went to a private school after an underwhelming kindergarten experience with the eldest. The requirement back then was 10 hours of "school service" per child per semester, or else pay a fine for every unserved hour. It was only possible because I was still a baby and we had the luxury of our mother staying home until we were all much older. For a lot of reasons, we moved into a better district, so I had public school the whole time.

    The local catholic high school however, has been used as a dumping ground for the spoiled kids with poor behavior records. They have a clean-slate policy, so colleges won't see anything their little angels did at public school. The poor teachers at that school then have to deal with a handful of new holy terrors every year.
     
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  21. MathGuy82

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    I agree that one person's trash is another person's treasure. If traditional public schools don't fit the kid, then we have online, in classroom charter, part classroom/part online, homeschool, alternative schools, math/science based schools, ect. Saying that true public schools are the best for everyone or most people is false. Many great and famous people (scholarly and scholastic) did not all graduate from public high schools. I hope with the new election that schools continued to be funded so students can have this choice. Don't close one school because of low enrollment, each municipality should have the funds from the state to build and have many different types of schools/education and access to schools online. Traditional schools should never go away, neither should non-traditional. If we have a variety, I think there is less discipline problems since students have/families have a choice where to go.
     
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  22. Mr Magoo

    Mr Magoo Comrade

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    What is surprising to me is the number of students who go to school and just sit there (doing nothing) , day after day.

    I mean, if you are going to make the effort to go somewhere and actually be there.

    What is the point, if you just sit and do nothing ?

    Time is a precious thing. We only have so much, when it's gone, it's gone.
     
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  23. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Unfortunately, children don't have the maturity to see beyond the ends of their noses. Teachers everywhere hope that those children who sit and do nothing will eventually retain some knowledge that will assist them if they successfully make it to adulthood without ending up in jail or worse.
     
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  24. TeacherCuriousExplore

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    Traditional schools should never go away because rural areas and low income areas does not have access to most non traditional schools. I work in a rural area and the only schools that are available aside from the traditional school is a prep school and a charter.
     
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  25. viola_x_wittrockiana

    viola_x_wittrockiana Comrade

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    Yes and no. The district where I went to college had an uncommon mix of schools. There's a Lutheran school and a Catholic school, but the public district offers a math/science magnet, a Montessori school, an accelerated school, an alternative school, an international academy (they funnel all of the ESL kids into one school to maximize resources), and the university's lab school. Pretty much the whole city is low SES. The behavior wasn't good at any of them. You get well-behaved children when the parents are invested and active in their child's education all year, not just at lottery/application time. However, the possibility of being kicked out does help.
     
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  26. MathGuy82

    MathGuy82 Companion

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    That makes sense! Parents are one of the biggest parts.
     
  27. MathGuy82

    MathGuy82 Companion

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    Leaving teaching for good? Or just moving to another school. Don't mean to change topic but curious as to why?
     
  28. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Leaving teaching for a while. I don't know for good. I've definitely enjoyed teaching when it was at the right school and I might come back to it later in life, but I'm going to try something different for a while.

    I'm glad to be leaving for a few reasons, one being that my school treats teachers very unprofessionally, and more in line with this thread, I think the climate and attitudes towards public education are going to take a nosedive with this new administration. Basically I will probably just see more of the same treatment and attitudes towards teachers from people who see teachers as the same as factory, or retail workers rather than professionals and schools as businesses. I am just tired of dealing with it. Those attitudes were under the surface, but I have a feeling they are going to bubble up even further.
     
  29. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    This is too bad, but hope you've found something great to move on to.
     
  30. MathGuy82

    MathGuy82 Companion

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    Well hope you find something good! There have been times where I have thought about quitting too.
     

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