Not ready to student teach...Help...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by heyitssteph, Feb 4, 2015.

  1. heyitssteph

    heyitssteph Rookie

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    Feb 4, 2015

    Hi everyone,

    I am currently a grad student in a very intense, full time, one year masters program in education. I like the school and the teacher that I was given for my student teaching placement. However - I am not at all feeling ready for this. I have had to take a full course load with prerequisites (extra courses) this year while managing a job. The school and program have been putting extra pressure on me since I have had to take extra classes and meet tight deadlines that do not apply to all students in the program. Lately I am having trouble keeping up. My grades are slipping and I'm still working my behind off to just get everything done. I am supposed to be student teaching in a school and classroom with many high needs students. I feel like every week the program is ramping up the pressure when I am already in way over my head. I can continue with the program without following the one year sequence but is this the right call? Just to make this clear I am NOT doubting whether or not I should be a teacher just whether or not I need to proceed with student teaching. I also have chronic anxiety and have had a recent bout of major depression, while I am taking medication and feeling some improvement, I don't know if I want to put my mental health at major risk right now. Can anyone out there relate?
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Feb 4, 2015

    It sounds as if you are buried right now. I know someone who found themselves in a similar situation, and went ahead with the ST because the school expected it. It ended poorly, and he didn't pass. Now, there is a happy ending. The same student repeated his student teaching the next semester, with no other school work, no job. He flew through with straight A's. I can't speak to the anxiety and depression, but I can tell you that if I were in doubt about being physically ready to do the ST, I would put on the brakes and put it off a semester. I know that everyone wants to be finished with school, on their way to making their way in the world - in other words, finding a job and getting paid. There is no one size fits all time schedule, and I would call it taking the scenic route. You had to make some unscheduled stops along the way, faced rough roads, and traveled more distance than you should be expected in the allotted time. I am not your parents, and if they are paying for your education, they may have a different perspective. You want to teach, and you have come a long way down the road towards that goal. Don't stay on the school's timeline if it isn't right for you. Student teaching this year, or a semester later doesn't seem like a huge or stressful decision to me, especially if you are still trying to work full time. Save your money, if possible, so that you can be 100% invested in your ST experience. If you think that delaying it by one semester seems stressful, consider spending the tuition and having to repeat it. Just my thoughts.
     
  4. heyitssteph

    heyitssteph Rookie

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    Feb 4, 2015

    My parents paid for my undergrad, so I am on my own for graduate school. I would still be taking classes for the next few months before the 10 week stretch of student teaching is scheduled to begin, so I wouldn't lose the aid that I have right now. I appreciate your words of wisdom and I am hoping that I will have the same happy ending that your student had. :)
     
  5. bluegill

    bluegill Rookie

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    Feb 4, 2015

    Student teaching was overwhelming for me because my program required classes during the experience, I had hardly any money (no job; no financial aid), and my wife immigrated to the USA right in the middle of it.

    I was very nervous before going into it, but I built confidence in myself within the first two weeks. My cooperating teachers were also supportive of me. Teachers are busy people and they will understand your predicametn and try to help you adjust. I'd say just roll with it and get into a strong routine.

    To be honest though, I was way more nervous before starting this year all on my own. Thought those kids would eat me alive, heh heh.
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 5, 2015

    Is it an option for you to quit working for a while?
     
  7. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    Feb 5, 2015

    You are handling a lot at this time. Most of my classmates only did their student teaching and maybe one other class. Most only had a part-time job with a few hours during the week. Student teaching requires a lot of extra hours outside of the classroom for lesson planning and completing assignments.
     
  8. WarriorPrncss

    WarriorPrncss Companion

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    Feb 7, 2015

    Currently, I am working a full time 40hour a week job, carrying 15 units and student teaching 2 full days a week.

    It's HARD. No doubt. But it's do-able.

    It's all about scheduling. I have a planner and know exactly when I work, when I student teach, and I even schedule my homework time. I even make sure I do meal prep so I have healthy meals and snacks to get me through the day without being loaded down by fast food and junk.

    Also... it's okay to not feel ready. It's totally normal. Learning about lesson planning and classroom management and how to be in the classroom is WAY different than actually being in the classroom. The more you are there the better it will feel. You can do it. :)
     
  9. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Feb 7, 2015

    This is my question as well. I'm a little surprised that they were ok with you working full time when you entered this program. I did an intensive 16 month credential/MS program (60 units), and we were HIGHLY encouraged not to work, or to at least work as little as possible. We were told that working would not be an acceptable excuse for anything - late work, missing classes, etc.

    I didn't work (except for during the summer when our course load was slightly reduced and a bit of subbing during the year), and I now have the loans to show for it. However, it was worth it. I was able to put 100% into my student teaching experiences, which got me stellar letters of recommendation from my CTs, which led to getting a job as a teacher.
     
  10. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Feb 7, 2015

    I started my degree working half time. I realized even half time with student teaching every day of the week and all the classes was too much. I talked to my lead professor for my program and they got me a paid teacher assistant position (for student teaching) on campus for the semester. We did have a campus elementary school so it made it possible, if your college has one maybe they can do the same. I then quit my job. All I had to do was ask what should I do and the college took care of it for me. You might ask and explain the problem.
     
  11. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Feb 11, 2015

    I had a choice between taking extra credits each semester and finishing a semester early to graduate within 4 years with my bachelor's or I could do the course work over 4 years and then add a semester to do my student teaching. I went with the "easier" method of graduating in 4.5 years so that I could focus on course work and focus on student teaching. My college required that we did not have another job while student teaching - if they found out that we did they would kick us out of student teaching.

    If you're not getting much out of your coursework or your student teaching right now, I would choose the course work and drop student teaching until later. There is only so much you can do and you want the course work and the student teaching experience to be meaningful to you.
     

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