Not Reaching Young 2s and 3 yr olds for science

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Ms.Titwillow, Nov 22, 2010.

  1. Ms.Titwillow

    Ms.Titwillow Rookie

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    Nov 22, 2010

    I'm supposed to be teaching science to three groups of children. The older group 'gets' it...the younger kids don't get what I'm teaching at all. For example, I was trying to teach them about melting. I ask them what they see in front of them (a bowl of ice) and maybe one of them can tell me what it is (then I give them ice to hold). Then I ask where have you seen ice before? All blank stares. So I go into 'this is ice', 'this is water', this is hot water and the ice is going away...it's melting. All blank stares. I just had to change the lesson to Hot and Cold and had them touch/feel the water. It's like this with all of the lessons. I'm getting my lessons from two preschool science book/lessons/ideas. What do you do?
     
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  3. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Nov 22, 2010

    Have you studied Paiget? He explains that young children can not understand abstract ideas. You can show them, which provides some pre-learning. Don't worry, they will learn when they are ready. If you show them some ice in some soda, they can tell you what it is, because you are showing them a concreate idea.
     
  4. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Nov 22, 2010

    2s and 3s are very young. I would focus on more concrete ideas with them as Blue mentioned. Teach the older ones something higher and then the younger ones may need a different concept or even more exploring time.
     
  5. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Nov 22, 2010

    2 yr olds need to get out in nature and pick up leaves off of the ground, pick up acorns off of the ground, and roll around in the grass. In the wintertime, they need to go outside and and play in the snow and have experiential science, if you will.

    Talking with them about what they're seeing, what they're feeling, etc. will familiarize them with the scientific concepts you're trying to get them to understand.
     
  6. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Nov 22, 2010

    I teach sped 3's... many are functioning closer to a 2-yr-old level... and I sometimes struggle with science, also. Then I remember that sensory activities are also science... so playing with sand, shaving cream, water, goop, playdough... that's science. They may not get the "why" yet, and th'ats OK... remember, they're just getting into that asking "why" stage, and often have a hard time comprehending even though they raelly want to know, they're just not there yet.

    When we can, I try to have them predict what will happen (what's inside this pumpkin? What will happen if we let this ice sit here?)... sometimes the predictions are way off base, but that's OK, they're learning.

    It's totally OK to just let them explore the materials, talk about how it smells, feels, etc... that IS science :)
     
  7. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    Nov 22, 2010

    Yes, sensory is definetly science, here are some sensory themed science ideas:

    play dough
    floam
    bird seed
    soapy water
    bubbles
    insta-snow
    insta-worms
    oobleck
    flubber
    leaves from outside
    shaving cream
    moon sand
    sand
    pasta
    gravel
    shredded papper
    paper to tear
    different textured fabric
    musical intruments to explore
    color mixing
     
  8. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Nov 22, 2010

    Let's say there is a themed reason for ice......great.....the two's can do it....they will just do it differently.

    Make your ice in to pops by putting some of your billion wooden tounge deppressers in the ice cube holes....you have those I imagine. Anyway, then you put your powdered tempra on a huge piece of paper and let the melting ice cube turn it into paint as it returns to a liquid. I have seen teachers use kool aid for this as well.

    In the sensory table you freeze a ton of stuff that they will find interesting in a block of water (try to not let them be too small if you have to worry about that) and then hand them turkey basters, eye droppers for medicines, glasses and spoons and so on and let the melt it out.

    Then they will have the concept-ICE-and next year when they need to listen to someone "talk" about ice they will know what ICE is :) and you will know that the ice talk is working because they are older and YOU laid the ground work!!

    Great job!! :hugs:
     
  9. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Nov 23, 2010

    Exactly :)

    Also for the ice cube painting, you can do colored ice-a few drops of food coloring in the water, or use liquid watercolors if you have them. That eliminated the need for powdered tempra if you don't have it.

    Depending on the group, you can also observe if ice melts the same or different if you put a cube in different places... we did in the freezer, outside, in the fridge, on top of the cubbies, next to the window, etc... they were FASCINATED by this!

    We also had some fun letting snow melt, then seeing what happens when we put it outside.
     
  10. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Nov 23, 2010

    And if you have snow outside....predict what would happen to a jello mold of ice w/ glitter in it left outside on your playground. Will it make ice? Will it be gone? Will the squirrels drink it?

    Post your "hypothesis" and check..........

    It is all science.

    By the way I wanted to say.....even your 3s and 4s will like this kind of science. They may still be expected to do the other kind....but they would benifit from this kind as well.
     
  11. Ms.Titwillow

    Ms.Titwillow Rookie

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    Nov 24, 2010

    Definitely no snow here! Thanks for reminding me about the sensorial part of science...I seem to forget that...coming from teaching upper grades.

    But what do you say/do when you present shredded paper, oobleck, birdseed, etc.?

    What is insta-snow and insta-worms??
     
  12. Maxadoodle

    Maxadoodle Comrade

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    Nov 24, 2010

    Another cool item for your science area is a mortar and pestle for grinding things. My 3's like to grind cereal and herbs.
     
  13. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Nov 24, 2010

    OH! Cereal!! We never tried that in there!!!!! Love that!!
     
  14. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Nov 28, 2010

    shredded paper can be formed into bird nests, different types of paper make different sounds when you scrucnh them up, some are thick, some are thin, some are softer, , oobleck is a physics lesson , that I don't even understand, but is lots of fun to play with--but it's kinda like it's melting when you pick it up and it turns into a liquid again, bird seed is food, what kind of animals eat what kind of food--- it's all science, earth science, p hyscial science, and it's all FUN!
     
  15. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Nov 28, 2010

    2 year olds aren't ready to be "explained" things like this. All they need is a sensory table. No need for a huge lesson.

    There is a pretty big gap between 2 and 3 yr olds. I would teach them separately.
     
  16. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Nov 28, 2010

    When you have the sensory table going, the teaching can be varied by what you tell the children. More depth with the comments to the threes less to the twos.

    Or better, when the children naturally pair up you may end up with the older threes in a group that can go to a teacher lead center near the sensory table, and the next group can "play" with the science idea in the table. Then switch groups.
     

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