not being asked back next year

Discussion in 'General Education' started by matherine, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. matherine

    matherine Rookie

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    Apr 17, 2012

    I am a first year teacher this year hired on a one-year contract. My principal met with me this morning for my evaluation meeting and said that I will not be asked back next year because my classroom management didn't improve to the point he needed it to get to. There were still too many students off-task when he observed me. He was very kind about it - he said he knows that I've learned a lot this year and have worked very hard and that he'll work with me as much as possible to find a new job. He said that he doesn't think a Title 1 school is the right place for me - I should try working in a school where kids want to learn.

    My dilemma is that I got my master's degree and licensure through a teacher fellowship program that requires me to teach in a Title 1 school in any one of three specific districts for the next 3 years or pay back $40,000 (which I'm really not sure how I would come up with). Monetary commitment aside, I really do want to work in a Title 1 school. I truly believe that I could still be a successful teacher in a Title 1 school with a better start to the year after everything I've learned, but he gave the impression that he doesn't think I should seek out those jobs. Of course when he told me all this news I started sobbing and wasn't really able to talk to him or ask him these questions. Should I meet with him again and ask him what kind of recommendation he would give me if I applied to other Title 1 schools in our district? Do I even have a chance of getting another job if I was not asked back because of classroom management?

    Sorry if this doesn't make total sense or if I'm not looking at things the right way, my head is a blur and I just wanted to get something posted so I can start moving ahead for next year.
     
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  3. matherine

    matherine Rookie

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    Apr 17, 2012

    Also thinking of attending a Fred Jones seminar this summer to address classroom management. Has anyone been? Would it be worth the money?
     
  4. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Apr 17, 2012

    You are further along in your career than I am, but what I would do is to develop a typed out action plan about what you plan to do to improve your classroom management. Put a lot of thought into attending professional development, what type of resources you can tap into in your network, and what exactly you feel that you need to work on in your classroom management, (building presence, maintaining clear consequences, etc.).

    Bring this with you when you talk to your principal. Clearly explain why you NEED to be in a Title 1 school (both monetary and ideology reasons) and that you have a clearly laid out path to improve your classroom management and show him your plan. State that you understand his decision in not bringing you back but say that you would be extremely grateful if he would give you his blessings and recommendations to apply at one of the other Title 1 schools that you need to be at.

    Best of luck! My prayers are with you.
     
  5. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Apr 17, 2012

    I'm sorry for your situation. I would definitely talk with your P again, as he sounds pretty supportive. I am not familiar with the seminar you refer to, but I definitely think that you need to attend workshops to show potential employers that you are committed to improving your weaknesses.

    As for Title I schools, the label means something completely different then it did 10, or even 5 years, ago. With the economic downturn, many schools qualified as Title I. In the school district I teach in, every single school is now Title I. This was not the case when I started- maybe 60% at the most were Title I. So, not all Title I schools are equal. I think your principal is putting an unnecessary emphasis of Title I schools and the populations within them.
     
  6. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Apr 17, 2012

    I agree that you should meet with him again. Did he help you at all with classroom management, or did he just tell you to improve? I would ask him for suggestions.
     
  7. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Apr 17, 2012

    Honestly, I'm in the exact same situation. However, I was planning to resign from my school anyway, so I was not that upset. Nothing they said, positive or negative, was invalid. I was mostly disappointed at the lack of feedback all year. They gave me mostly positive reviews and gave zero indication I would be non-renewed. I think this is so unfortunate and unfair, but typical of my school's chaos. Several other teachers had similar conversations. We all have interviews coming up. Life goes on. Be professional and don't burn bridges.

    Tomorrow I have an interview with a school that is title I/high needs like my current school. I have not batted an eye at continuing with urban teaching. Only you know if this is your passion and the population you want to teach. I know I have things to work on, but I will do so and move on. It's been a rough year and I will be better for it next year. :hugs:
     
  8. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Apr 17, 2012

    I have attended four times. I liked it so much the first time I sold it to my staff and administration attending with a new group of teachers three additional times. I only wish I would have known about Jones when I started teaching. Jones is not for everyone. You have to be prepared for change and be able to take a hard look at yourself or as Jones puts it, "You will never control a room full of squirmy bodies until, first, you learn to control yourself."
     
  9. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Apr 17, 2012

    You should speak with him again. I am sure he will understand that when you initially got the news, you were still processing everything and unable to really discuss it with him the way you would like.
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Apr 18, 2012

    Ah, I'm sorry. I know you've had a tough year and have worked on turning things around.
     
  11. GTB4GT

    GTB4GT Cohort

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    Apr 18, 2012

    I am a first year teacher but I am middle aged and have years of experience. There is another first year teacher in my school who is just out of college. I would be surprised if she gets invited back. It's sad because she is very bright, passionate and caring. she struggles with classroom management (we teach hs) but I have to imagine most 22 - 24 year people would. I don't picture myself doing well at it at that point in my life. It's certainly challenging enough now and I am over twice that age and have years of management/supervision experience.

    I really feel bad. This young woman has tons of potential but I guess in today's environment there is no time allowed for young people to mature. It's a bit frightening too as I look at the ages of my peers - there should be younger people in the pipeline as we will have a number of retirements in the next 5 - 10 years.
     
  12. matherine

    matherine Rookie

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    Apr 21, 2012

    Thanks everyone. The coordinator of my school's induction program for new employees also offered me her support this week and said I was a great employee, just not matched well to the job at this school. She said she would be happy to provide a reference for me. I'm wondering who else I should ask for a reference? My principal, obviously, but most applications need 3 or 4. Should I continue to use my references from my student teaching year last year? I know other people have listed the AP as a reference, but our APs just deal with referrals, they don't really interact with teachers a lot - I'm not really sure what they would have to say about me. Also, should I have letters of rec. or just list their contact info as references?

    On another note, I'm wondering if interviewers will ask me why I'm not continuing at my current school. Even before I met with my principal I was seriously considering looking at other schools since ours is so out of control and the teachers have such low morale. Do I need to tell them I was not asked back because my classroom management didn't improve enough? I feel like principals would be very hesitant to hire someone who had difficulty with classroom management. But of course I can't lie about my classroom management, I honestly had a lot of difficulties, but feel much more prepared for next year.
     
  13. matherine

    matherine Rookie

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    Apr 21, 2012

    And would my answer to the application question "Have you ever failed to be rehired?" be yes or no? I'm only unsure since all new teachers in my district were hired on one-year-only contracts and all new teachers received termination letters. But of course my principal said that he wouldn't hire me for next year.
     
  14. lovebeingteach

    lovebeingteach Companion

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    Apr 21, 2012

    "I can accept failure, everyone fails at something. But I can't accept not trying."~Michael Jordan
    That aside....I have to wonder if this is the best place for you. If the principal really said that you need to be somewhere where the kids want to learn, that says a lot about how he feels about his school. Did he help you with your classroom management? You should have been placed on some sort of action plan if the classroom management was that bad. I would try to get another job in one of the other counties. If you can't, take that as an opportunity to do something else. My uncle got fired as a teacher about 30 years ago, now has his doctorate and works for NASA. It's not the end of the world by any means.
     
  15. matherine

    matherine Rookie

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    My principal talked to me about improving my "with-it-ness" in the classroom to help with management - moving from kid to kid quicker and being more aware of what's going on across the classroom. He said that I improved in this, but not enough. For my action plan I set up a series of consequences where students had two warnings, then went to a buddy room for a time out, then received a referral. I spent an exhaustive amount of energy carrying out these consequences and it did help the classroom climate, but not enough. My principal told me the thing I need to work on is having higher expectations for student behavior.
     
  16. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Apr 21, 2012

    Ask for letters of recommendation from your principal and the coordinator of the induction program. It sounds as though they will come through for you. Use your student teaching references as well.

    Don't hesitate to apply for other urban positions. With a math certification and a year of experience in an urban school under your belt, principals will be glad to meet with you. Tell them what you have learned and what you will do differently next year. You will be surprised at how many urban school principals will welcome you to their school. These principals know that it takes time for a teacher to develop the management skills needed for the inner city.

    We need teachers like you in our urban schools - those who know the tough challenges involved and who still continue to face those challenges because of the desire to make a difference in the lives of these children. Good luck!
     
  17. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Apr 21, 2012

    You will find that starting out the year with this stricter policy will make a huge difference. You found a difference in climate after implementing this mid-year. Doing it from the get-go can make all the difference in the world. Your experience will make your second year much easier.
     
  18. matherine

    matherine Rookie

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    Apr 23, 2012

    First interview set up! It's at an all-girls charter school.
     
  19. sizzla_222

    sizzla_222 Companion

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    Apr 23, 2012

    Sounds great! But if you get the job at that school does that mean that you will have to pay back the 40,000 as it is not one of the specific districts?
     
  20. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Apr 23, 2012

    Good luck!
     
  21. matherine

    matherine Rookie

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    Apr 23, 2012

    One of the members of the board of directors at this school works with my teaching fellowship program, so it's included in our list of schools we can work at.
     

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