North Carolina Jobs (Relocating, probably...)

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Leaborb192, Jul 3, 2016.

  1. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    I can speak to Pinehurst and the surrounding area -- you would be working for Moore County Public Schools if you work in a public school. You don't have to ask about salary, because NC has a statewide salary. You only have to look to see the supplements (if any).

    Socially --
    The pros -- great if you love golf or horseback riding

    Cons -- not a lot else to do -- no malls (only a a few strips shopping centers, no major department stores, etc.)

    Professionally --

    The pros -- very nice and professional people to work with. Lots of relevant Professional Development each year.

    The cons -- You can't actually apply just to Pinehurst. You'd work for Moore County schools, and even if you start at Pinehurst, you can (and will) be moved at any time to any school in Moore County and any grade you are certified for -- at their will based on enrollment. It happens a lot. Principals move around a lot, too. Moore County is huge (physically) so you could end up quite a distance from where you live.

    EDIT: Moore County does have a supplement listed of $3,500.

    Starting pay is very low in NC -- we are 48th in the nation for low pay. With 0-4 years of experience, you would start at $35,000. You won't get an increase until you have 5 years of experience. That is state wide. Districts in NC all pay the same. Some in bigger cities have small supplements but I do not believe Moore County does.

    Also, make sure you have your NC Teaching License in hand before you apply. The state system (to which you must apply) and Moore County in particular doesn't interview if you don't already have it. If you go to their job fair, they do a panel interview with very specific questions that they ask all applicants. They use a rubric and give you a score. If your score is high enough, they will forward your info on to principals.

    Finally, you'd probably want to live near Pinehurst, not actually in it. Pinehurst is more expensive than other places in this area.

    Good luck in your job search.

    -Rain
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2016
  4. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    The pay in NC is why there are so many openings. There is a statewide pay scale, and they can't go above that. Some cities (especially inner city type areas) offer supplements (those are generally advertised well on their web pages) in some places, but those are generally larger cities. Even with those supplements,

    Here is the most recent list of supplements. http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/docs/fbs/finance/salary/supplements/2010-11supplements.pdf

    And here is the most recent list of statewide salaries.
    http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/docs/fbs/finance/salary/schedules/2015-16schedules.pdf
     
  5. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Okay, 1 last thing I forgot to say. It was really easy to get a license in NC. I sent in my VA license copy, my official Praxis scores (Praxis I and II) and a couple of other things, and voila! I got it by return mail. It didn't take long.
     
  6. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    The salary schedule is depressing!!! :(
     
  7. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Yep! I can't imagine anyone coming here to teach because of the pay versus the cost of living. I came here after my mother passed away to help look after my elderly father (who has Alzheimer's.) I took quite a pay cut to move here, but have never regretted it. Being with my dad while he still knows who I am is so worth it. I wouldn't trade this time for the world.
     
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  8. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    I don't teach in North Carolina, so I cannot speak for any of these individual districts teach treat their teachers. I do live just outside of the state though so I have heard of some of the areas listed. I will say that I have heard great things about the town of Cary. I have a friend moving there who is in education, and I have heard it is a nice place to live!
     
  9. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Hugs to you, Rain!

    May I ask which state you moved to NC from?
     
  10. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Look at those supplements carefully. The districts are divided by counties. You can have a small town, in an affluent or semi-affluent district that will give you a much higher supplement than other districts. Choose one where the supplement is a percentage, not a flat sum if you're planning to stay a while. If I remember correctly, smaller towns near higher-supplement districts tend to have higher supplements themselves.

    The cost of living varies greatly state-wide, as I'm sure you're familiar with in NY. You won't get rich teaching in NC, but depending upon the town you choose, you can be comfortable.

    Other things to consider: You would not receive tenure. Tenure is only available to teachers that earned it before a certain time. We're grandfathered in. As you can see from the schedule, there is a salary cap. After a certain number of years, you won't earn a step increase each year. You'd have to rely on COLA raises or hope the General Assembly changes its mind (which is likely for both, but not promised). If you don't get hired by January 1, 2016 as a full-time, permanent employee, you will not be eligible for health insurance when you retire. And there is no union. When you sign your contract you'll notice that you are an at-will employee. They can fire you on the spot at any time within the school year and you'd have to go at that time. Since you won't have tenure, you won't even have an opportunity to defend yourself. You can leave on your own, as well. You can decide that teaching here is not for you and leave. You will likely have to promise to give 30 days notice, however. If you don't, then you'll risk losing your NC license.

    Just a bit of advice: southern small town people are quite welcoming to new residents. What they don't appreciate is when someone moves to their town for all of the wonderful things it has, and immediately starts complaining how "backwards" and "slow" and other such nonsense, the South is. For some reason, transplants from NY and NJ receive more scrutiny than others do, so you might want to be a tad more careful with any complaints after your move.
     
  11. RainStorm

    RainStorm Aficionado

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    Virginia -- The southeast part, which doesn't pay all that much itself. I teach at a very small private school now-- and coming to that from inner city was a shock. I have to say, I love the school where I teach.
     
  12. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  13. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  14. lilia123

    lilia123 Companion

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    I work on the southeastern coast of NC and originally came from the North East. The salary supplements by county vary anywhere from 0 to 8,000 a year from the districts I know about. I know someone who teaches in Johnston County where Cary is and she likes it. In NC you apply directly to schools after creating a state application. In the district I live we have very nice areas and my kids go to a great school but like anywhere there is bad parts of town. The cost of living also varies a bit in NC, so look at that too. Good Luck with your search.
     
  15. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Just curious about your time in Arizona. Their teacher salaries look undernourished, so was it difficult to live there within such a tight budget? Pros and cons? I know someone who may be interested, is free to relocate, and information would help.

    I know little about NC except that I took a PBS Teacherline course and several of the cohort members were from NC, and nice as can be. Nice coworkers has to count for something, right?
     
  16. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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