Nonstop talking!!

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by Nikkiski21, Oct 9, 2015.

  1. Nikkiski21

    Nikkiski21 Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2015

    Okay so I'm a new teacher, 5th grade ELA. I'm having some issues with behavior management.

    I have one class who loves to challenge me. I several kids in the class who never stop talking, even when I give them behavior marks (our discipline plan). They are constantly talking out and questioning me to the point where the other kids are suffering because I constantly have to be talking time away from a lesson or activity to tell the misbehaving kids to stop. What do I do here?? The only time they behave is when I break out the candy or the reward tickets, but I don't want to have to do that every time. It's my last class of the day and it stresses me out...I dread it! And it's also embarrassing that I can't control some of these kids! I see the good kids looking at me like "do something already!" but I don't know what else to try!

    If anyone has any advice, I would appreciate it. My other two classes are under control so I don't understand what it is about this particular bunch.
     
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  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    About how many students do you have that blurt out? Maybe you can give them 5 tokens and each time they talk out, you can take a token away. When all tokens are gone, then a consequence is given. If they have at least 4 tokens remaining, then they can get a reward. And if they work for candy then use it to your advantage. Start out by giving them candy for every little thing they do correctly and then begin to lengthen the time between giving out the rewards.
     
  4. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    A few questions:

    1. What do the behavior marks do? What happens when they are given one. Are they just told it has a behavior mark? What consequence is associated with it?

    2. Do you have the ability to create a time-out area? Call home?

    Answering these questions will let us know if you have effective consequences in your classroom.
     
  5. Nikkiski21

    Nikkiski21 Rookie

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    The behavior marks correlate with the quarterly reward program. If the students get more than ten behavior marks in a quarter, then they can't participate in the reward. The reward is an afternoon spent watching a movie or playing games.

    I have a table in the back of my room. Sometimes I will send one of the students there for the remainder of the class. I've never called it the time out area, but they know if they get sent there then they are in trouble.
     
  6. Nikkiski21

    Nikkiski21 Rookie

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    It is probably about 5 kids that are constantly blurting out or out of their seats, doing things they shouldn't be. The token idea is a good one! I've never heard of doing that before!
     
  7. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    That's a good reward for kids who have it together, but most 5th graders cannot think that long term, which makes behavior marks a pretty poor consequence.

    They need something more immediate. The time-out table is a good one. Make use of it more often. If it were me, I would eliminate telling students about their behavior marks during class entirely. I might tell them that they've lost one after class has ended explaining to them why they lost it (because your school requires it), but otherwise I don't think it would change much within the classroom and would instead waste time.

    I would have multiple time-out tables around the room. Just a place where a student can sit apart from the rest of the class, where they cannot interact in fun activities or group work (so you have to have an engaging class with fun activities and group work). If a student broke the blurting rule, or talking while I am talking rule, they would get one warning. If it happened again, they're sent to the time-out table.

    If they're fooling around in the time out table or they come back and break the rules again, I would have them call home and explain what they did in class that was a violation of the rules, and then you ask the parent if you could keep them in for recess to practice raising their hand to comment instead of blurting out.

    Rewards for behaving within the expectations is demeaning to the students who aren't behaving, communicating lower expectations for them, and unfair for the students who are already behaving. Expect all your students to behave to the standards you set (make sure your rules and standards are clear). Provide consequences when they violate them. Only reward those who are truly truly outstanding.

    I recommend reading smartclassroommanagement.com if you need help with procedures, and classroom management tips. It's really a life-saver and completely made teaching enjoyable for me, rather than an uphill struggle with behavior.
     
  8. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Oct 9, 2015

    I would try doing that to see if it curbs their behavior at all. Good luck!
     
  9. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Maybe the quarterly reward program is too far for them and they should get something more frequent. Some kids just can't think that far.
    If they question you, don't get in a battle with them with explaining or justifying yourself, you will just lose every time. They don't question you because they don't understand you, they do it because it takes away from instruction, and or because they enjoy the attention they get or to see that it frustrates you.
     
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  10. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I posted something similar. It's just currently waiting to be moderated. :p

    Here is what I said:

    That's a good reward for kids who have it together, but most 5th graders cannot think that long term, which makes behavior marks a pretty poor consequence.

    They need something more immediate. The time-out table is a good one. Make use of it more often. If it were me, I would eliminate telling students about their behavior marks during class entirely. I might tell them that they've lost one after class has ended explaining to them why they lost it (because your school requires it), but otherwise I don't think it would change much within the classroom and would instead waste time.

    I would have multiple time-out tables around the room. Just a place where a student can sit apart from the rest of the class, where they cannot interact in fun activities or group work (so you have to have an engaging class with fun activities and group work). If a student broke the blurting rule, or talking while I am talking rule, they would get one warning. If it happened again, they're sent to the time-out table.

    If they're fooling around in the time out table or they come back and break the rules again, I would have them call home and explain what they did in class that was a violation of the rules, and then you ask the parent if you could keep them in for recess to practice raising their hand to comment instead of blurting out.

    Rewards for behaving within the expectations is demeaning to the students who aren't behaving, communicating lower expectations for them, and unfair for the students who are already behaving. Expect all your students to behave to the standards you set (make sure your rules and standards are clear). Provide consequences when they violate them. Only reward those who are truly truly outstanding.

    I recommend reading smartclassroommanagement.com if you need help with procedures, and classroom management tips. It's really a life-saver and completely made teaching enjoyable for me, rather than an uphill struggle with behavior.
     
  11. Nikkiski21

    Nikkiski21 Rookie

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    Oct 11, 2015


    I think you're right, that the reward is too far away for many of them to understand or care. Starting tomorrow, I'm going to implement using a 'time-out' table. The behavior marks don't do anything to impact a student's behavior for me. So I will give a warning and the next time it will be sitting at the table in the back alone. Hopefully this will work. My days go so well until this last class. It makes me hate teaching and I certainly don't want one of my administrators doing a walkthrough to find my kids out of control!
     
  12. Nikkiski21

    Nikkiski21 Rookie

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    I think some of them do love to see me frustrated and flustered. What do you suggest doing when this happens? I don't like to argue with students and I usually just ignore the student and go back to teaching. Later on I might talk to them after class, but still. Is there a better way to deal with that?
     
  13. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oct 12, 2015

    Don't give them the benefit of seeing you frustrated or flustered.

    Teaching is one profession where you have to learn to be very zen.

    1. Remind yourself that no matter what the behavior no matter how crazy, surprising, or unexpected, you will maintain your composure, calmly give the appropriate consequence, and walk away.
    2. Staying out of arguments is great. Keep doing that. Just walk away. If they're being disrespectful, give them a consequence once you and they are calm.
    3. Breathe well, make sure your environment is comfortable for you (I like to adjust the thermostat so it's pretty cold, when I get hot and stuffy, I get frustrated a lot more easily). Move slowly, speak calmly, and your attitude will also infect your students with calm behavior. If despite all of this, you're feeling like you're losing control, and you're flustered, simply walk away, take a few breaths, calm yourself, and return, ready to deal the consequences that need to be dealt.
    4. I personally don't find the 'talks' after class with the students to be that helpful. There's really nothing to say. They know they broke the rules, and they know why they got a consequence. Trying to say anymore to them is just me blowing hot-air at them. They're not really listening, and they don't really care. If you hold them accountable though, and they're sitting for a while in time-out while missing out on a fun activity, they'll eventually stew long enough to realize that their behavior was unacceptable in your class.
    5. A good classroom management mindset is one where you care about students enough to hold them accountable for their behavior, but you don't care if they misbehave. It shouldn't matter to you. They're kids. They're going to break rules and misbehave. So what? Your job is to just teach them the correct behavior by holding them accountable. Don't take their misbehavior personally. It's their choice to misbehave. It's your responsibility to calmly inform them of their consequence for their misbehavior and then move on to teach the rest of your class.
     
  14. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    A lot of kids love seeing the teacher get frustrated. It's funny to them and they feel it gives them power, because they have made you feel and act that way. A lot of students have absolutely no control over their lives at home, and are often neglected and starve for attention, so this actually gives them a sense of power. In their mind they feel that they do matter, because look what they did! The teacher stopped instruction to deal with them, and even got emotionally involved.

    The best thing to do is ignore, but if you can't, talk to them in a very calm, almost eerily calm and monotone way. Keep it very short, don't explain anything, just correct the behavior and get back to teaching.
    I often use nonverbal cues, I say the student's name, when he looks at me I just slowly, calmly shake my head. He knows exactly what he's doing wrong, and I'm telling him to stop it, without ever stopping what I'm doing.
     
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  15. Ulrikepra

    Ulrikepra New Member

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    So funny
     
  16. Mr Magoo

    Mr Magoo Comrade

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    .
     
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  17. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    You could write all you want on the board, it won't matter if you react / overreact / argue with students / allow things to happen. It's more complicated than writing 'no talking' on the board lol
     
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  18. Mr Magoo

    Mr Magoo Comrade

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    .
     
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  19. onetwothreeteach

    onetwothreeteach Rookie

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    Hi! I am a new ELA teacher as well, however, I teach sixth grade. I have been having some behavior management issues as well, and I find this extremely frustrating considering I never had any behavior management issues in my student teaching or prior. Please know that you are not alone! I hope your year is going better and happy holidays.
     
  20. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    If that works for you I'd be very surprised. Glaring and repeating "no talking" in my experience might stop it for a second, but it would start up again as soon as you look away.

    Writing their names on a piece of paper might be more effective because they might believe you're going to enact a consequence.
     
  21. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    When elementary students talk, they are activating zillions of neurons; it's an important learning tool for their eager minds. ELA students' minds are intrigued by languaging (hopefully) and this further drives their desire to talk. Another example of how a young mind perceives this, when I was a young boy, my strongest interest was in music. I was constantly finding time to listen to music, sit at the piano, play my recorder, and especially sing. Languaging is also a social function, and at this age, socialization is better than candy. Stephen Pinker writes how many of our modern languages were even developed by children of different first languages exploring languaging and socializing with each other. On the other hand, classrooms need order, rules, and consistency in order to function. The children need to learn that proper decorum is necessary for a group to function together.

    I would highly recommend not constantly changing your classroom management. Such a change will work temporarily, but then the novelty will wear off and a new change will be needed. Of course if what you're currently doing isn't helpful, yes, it's important to adjust, but afterwards consistency is more effective than catch-as-catch-can. I agree with the above that a calm attitude is more effective than a gruff attitude. The students behave because it's expected, not because the teacher gets frustrated. At a 10-12 year old level, these students are reasonable. They understand. If the first behavior management didn't work out, they understand the need for a new procedure. They understand that the teacher cares about them and their learning and that they aren't following expectations. It is obvious that you are doing something right by the way--only 5 students are not following expectations; your classroom is not out of control.

    The most effective tool is to speak with the students who are misbehaving. I agree that speaking to the students does little good, but I have found speaking with the students can be helpful. I especially depend on my ears in such conversations; listening is more effective than lecturing. I learned at a workshop that it helps for the teacher and student to focus on one particular misbehavior and then check with each other on how well that behavior is adjusting. If I might express an alternative opinion to rewards, not that that isn't effective, but I find that when students behave for prizes rather than behave because they are trying to keep the proper effective classroom decorum, the prize becomes the ultimate goal and the behavior is just something that gets in the way of the prize or worse yet, the misbehavior becomes more important than the prize. Then, sometimes, a game develops between the teacher and student where the teacher keeps upping the prizes to obtain the desired behavior.

    One more thought on blurting out, restrictions can become a game also. The students will find a way of avoiding the penalty but still getting their comments spoken; (oh, the interesting tricks I've seen on that!) I find the following more effective. If raising a hand is a requirement in the classroom, then I wait until a student raises her hand. I don't necessarily call on that student just because he blurted out first then suddenly remembered (yeah, right) to raise his hand. On the other hand, I once had a student who actually did try his hardest not to blurt out, honestly, and he felt so embarrassed when he caught himself doing so. We'd talk about it, and our conversations were more of comforting him and encouraging him. Doggone it, this kid was just so enthusiastic about learning, he just couldn't help himself.
     
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  22. Teachertimes

    Teachertimes Rookie

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    How much teacher talk is there vs student talk? How much time are they getting to spend collaborating or working together? This group may need more student centered style teaching.
     
  23. Secondary Teach

    Secondary Teach Companion

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    This is especially good advice. The benefit of this is that you can give said student the 1:1 attention he or she deserves and discuss the problems together. During class you can't do this because you're teaching. Some students may have legitimate reasons behind their misbehavior and may need to be referred to a school specialist or counselor. Some students on the other hand may just be misbehaving for no reason, in these cases you should work on solutions together, review potential consequences, and have the student sign the behavior action plan. Classroom dojo points and homework bonus points are strategies my friends also use in their classrooms and I hear it works well.
    :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2016
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  24. Penguin

    Penguin Rookie

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    Nonstop talking by students is always an issue. I teach 7th grade ELA in a tough school, so I've been working on developing strategies for this.

    First, there is no easy fix. You need a variety of strategies that you can pull out when each specific time calls for it (each time is different in its own unique way). That just takes experience, and we're all at different stages with that.

    One thing that has worked for me has been creating "teams." I put students into groups of 3-4, which is their team. I tell them to come up with a name based on a topic I give them. For example, I'll say that this time they choose a superhero for their team name. We have Team Batman, Team Wonder Woman, etc. They love that part of it - coming up with the name is really fun.

    Then I reward teams with a point when they are meeting expectations. When they are all working quietly when they are supposed to, when they all turn their homework in, and so on. I also use little challenges to keep them motivated, like spelling competitions. "Spell these five words - the team that gets the most right gets a point."

    They LOVE the team competition stuff, and it helps because then team members start holding others accountable, telling them to do what they're supposed to do.

    After a unit or a month (however you decide to do it), you can reward the winning team with something special. You can invite them to your classroom for a lunch party and provide a few snacks and play tween music. That's what I like to do. Or something else that works for your kids.

    It takes some planning and organization but it can really make your life easier in the long run if the kids buy into it.
     
  25. teachtosucceed

    teachtosucceed New Member

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    I have a student that keeps at me and I remain calm but it affects me later when I get home and I can't sleep. I have tried various things to get him to respect me and other, to listen and to work. Nothing is working. Today he went into my desk and took candy from it. I was shocked. His mother was there picking him up and did not saw him go into my desk and never said a thing. I had to ask him to get out/away from my desk. He is extremely disrespectful towards me and talks over me. Challenges me all day long. HELP, do I talk to parent?
     
  26. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
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  27. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    I totally agree. Concerning direct instruction, sometimes teachers rather than instructing become a one person show. The teacher ends up doing most of the work during the day. But the classroom isn't about the teacher. The teacher already has learned the stuff. The classroom is about the students. The more the students do the more they learn. The primary vehicle for instruction is communication, and communication includes not just listening, but also speaking, reading, and writing. Perhaps we can apply the old adage to direct instruction, "If you don't strike oil in 15 minutes, stop boring."

    It is important for parents to be aware of their students' school behavior rather than being shocked at a later date with a bomb of information concerning the misbehavior. Parents sometimes misunderstand the teacher's comments as a reflection against their parenting, and the situation needs to be approached as a team effort; the parent needs to understand that the teacher's intentions are out of respect for the parent's role in the child's development, but the teacher is also there to help as needed, and the teacher does need to maintain order in the classroom.

    You are very wise in staying calm. One person out of control (the student) is bad enough. When a teacher loses her/his cool, then there are two people out of control. I would recommend, in order to gain the student's respect, increasing the role of your own respect toward the student. I would recommend a time of listening to the student (rather than lecturing) and you and he coming up with a plan to eliminate specific misbehaviors and replace them with pro-behaviors; then check with him throughout the day or week to discuss his progress. In other words, although classroom rules do need consistent penalties, and as part of the class he needs to be subject to all these procedures, rather than just working against him with penalties (or rewards), work with him to achieve proper social decorum. I'd recommend that the goal for pro-behavior be to uplift the classroom experience for him and for the rest of the class including the teacher rather than achieving a reward, especially if it's a reward designed just for him. That only redirects the behavior toward obtaining the reward and often backfires. The goal should be to fit in socially with expected decorum.
     
  28. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    I would probably play the song "Yakety Yak", and start dancing around the room like a big ole' chicken when they won't stop talking, but that's probably why I don't teach 5th grade.
     

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