Non Readers in the 5th Grade??

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Mrs Teacher, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. Mrs Teacher

    Mrs Teacher Rookie

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    Sep 2, 2013

    I have 2 students who are reading at a 1st grade level, at best. Their writing is also similar.

    My other students are reading at a 3rd grade level and up.

    I'm at a loss of what to do because I feel glued to their hip with everything - helping them read their worksheets, text, answer questions, etc. ANYTHING that involves text means they need my help.

    They have IEPs and get special education services, but the reality in our district is that our special ed teachers are simply not in the classroom long enough.

    Suggestions?? ... I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed. I've never had non readers to this extent before.
     
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  3. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Sep 2, 2013

    Are they also enrolled in a reading class to improve their skills? Just wondering.
     
  4. Mrs Teacher

    Mrs Teacher Rookie

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    Sep 2, 2013

    The only class they're enrolled in is 5th grade with me... lol. I'm going to call and suggest after school tutoring, but I work in a high poverty area so that usually isn't an option for our families.

    My plan is to give them as much of my help as possible, but I just feel like it's such a demand that it will take away from me helping other students.
     
  5. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Sep 2, 2013

    If the children need different or extended services that should be part of the IEP. The services should be paid for by the district. You cannot suggest the parents pay for out of school tutoring when a student is on an IEP or the district is on the hook to pay for it. Basically you are telling the parents that the current IEP is not sufficient to make the amount of progress the student needs to be making.

    If the classroom instruction can't be designed for them to make progress, they may need a change in placement. You need to call an IEP meeting and explain that their needs are so great that they can't possibly make progress without more specialized instruction or more support in the classroom. I feel from your post that this will not be looked upon as a positive thing for you to do, but if the special education teachers are not in the room giving support per the IEP, the IEP is not being implemented and they are out of compliance. Even so, students that are that far behind can't have their needs met in a classroom that is that much above their level without dedicated 1:1 - 1:3 support. Even then it can prove difficult because they will be doing something completely different from the rest of the class and it may be too much of a distraction to them.
     
  6. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Sep 2, 2013

    I can understand your frustration. I teach 5th grade and I have a 7 year gap between my highest and lowest student. The lowest is at a 2nd grade level and the highest is at a 9th grade level. I have two students who read at a 2nd grade level and one at a 3rd grade level. It is a challenge.

    I would suggest since the students have IEPs to meet with the special education teacher. She might have some resources that you can use in the classroom that might help these students. I would suggest setting up a mutual agreed time that you could meet with the special ed person.

    Also from the special ed person and also on your own, find out more about the IEPs to find out what the individual goals are for these children.

    This will be a good start, but I'm sure you realize there will need to be more to get these children to gain some solid ground in reading. Let me know first how it goes with the special ed teacher, and then I'll give you some more ideas if you wish.
     
  7. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Sep 2, 2013

    I bet that many of your reading activities use similar directions. I would try to pair the directions with a simple picture and color code them to help your students be more independent as the year goes on.

    I would also try to have directions typed up or recorded so that the students can listen to the directions on the computer or via listening center. If possible, I would request a CD version of texts used so that the students can listen to the materials.
     
  8. MissMae

    MissMae Rookie

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    Sep 4, 2013

    This happened to me at the school I grew up in, which was severely low-income. They never got help at home, no special-ed, no IEPS (didn't exist), and no special classes. As it turns out, a couple of students, myself included, were reading at an upper level already, so our teachers would assign us a "buddies" to those that needed help. Whenever we did worksheets, reading groups, etc we would buddy up. The idea being that the accelerated student would finish their work early and have time to help their Buddy. You might try this because it really did help those students who were behind.
     
  9. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Sep 7, 2013

    Hi Mrs Teacher,
    I'm working with four new dyslexic students this summer who are similar to the kids you describe. One of these kids is in 6th grade, two are in 5th and one is in third. All are responding extremely well to the PI intervention, and it seems (so far) that their teachers will be allowing them to use this intervention in their classrooms.

    Please take a look at the Pireading web site - especially the newest videos of Cole, Mason, Ashton and Bethany. PI is incredibly simple to use and will not take away time from your daily teaching routine.

    This is your chance to make a huge impact in the academic lives of these two boys. I will personally support you by phone or e-mail and, if you are within driving distance of Foster, Rhode Island, I'll drive out to work directly with your students.

    The only thing I ask is that you share your experiences and new found knowledge of PI with your colleagues and the folks on this forum.:)

    Sincerely,
    Stephen Round
     

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