Non-reader in 2nd grade?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by DrivingPigeon, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 14, 2012

    Has anyone ever encountered this? I have never heard of such a thing until recently.
     
  2.  
  3. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Messages:
    2,061
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 14, 2012

    I've experienced it in much higher grades, but I teach special education. Do you know what is the cause?
     
  4. mkbren88

    mkbren88 Cohort

    Joined:
    May 31, 2011
    Messages:
    524
    Likes Received:
    15

    Aug 14, 2012

    I haven't encountered it, but know it happens. My fiance was a non-reader for many, many years. His teachers just kept on passing him even though he couldn't read. He can read now, but really struggles.
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 14, 2012

    According to our state standards, first graders are supposed to come to me reading about 70 sight words, and doing reasonably well on cvc words. According to the new standards, they are supposed to leave me reading 69 wpm with 98% accuracy and comprehension. That being said, I received 10 out of 16 entering first graders this year who aren't sure of their alphabet. I personally know of 3 students in years past who were sent on to 2nd grade, despite failing reading and being nonreaders. Our old P didn't believe in holding them back. I thought he was doing them a huge disservice. He also made the process to have a child tested for SPED absolutely excruciating and never followed through with the paperwork.
     
  6. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 14, 2012

    This child has not been referred for SPED, and is not ELL. I would love to see him be held back, but I was told that is not an option.
     
  7. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2012

    I've had non-readers in both 5th and 6th grade. It's uncommon but does happen.
     
  8. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2012

    Your first move is going to be collecting data and getting him RtI services so that you are able to make a sped referral if you think it is necessary.

    Also, build a relationship with the parents right away. It could be important in getting services.
     
  9. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 14, 2012

    That's my plan...Parents are not going to be easy to deal with, based on the interaction that I have had. Should be interesting!
     
  10. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    5,905
    Likes Received:
    776

    Aug 14, 2012

    I've got a non reader in 3rd, but obviously with teaching sped before I've seen it in much higher grades too. What's interesting to me about my student this year is that she's not in sped and is WAY lower than the kids who are. She's also one of the very few students who isn't an ELL (so they can't blame it on language issues) and I know she's been at the school for at least one year if not longer, so I'm not sure why the other kids are identified and she's not. I'm looking at getting her RtI services right away so she at least has some intervention outside of what I can do in the class.
     
  11. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 14, 2012

    RtI is definitely in order. Don't forget to work with her on phonemic awareness - there have been studies that showed that even older kids made greater gains when their interventions included PA.
     
  12. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,091
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 14, 2012

    Yes, last year I had a 6th grader that was severly dyslexic. He tested pre k. in reading.
     
  13. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    2

    Aug 14, 2012

    I had a non-reader in 4th grade last year. She was special ed. though. Unfortunately her classification/placement in my class was extremely inappropriate (she needed something more restrictive) and I truly believe that was part of the reason she was still not reading. Teachers just didn't have enough time to give her the attention she needed. There was also no other student in the class on the same level so whenever I wanted to work with her it basically had to be one-on-one for reading instruction.

    If the non-reader isn't classified that would definitely send up a red flag for me- unless there's a language barrier?

    We have loads of non-readers in 4th/5th grade in my school, but they're all new to the country and learning the language, so obviously much different than a child who's first language is English.
     
  14. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2007
    Messages:
    4,304
    Likes Received:
    1,281

    Aug 14, 2012

    I've had kids enter 2nd grade still struggling with letter/sound correspondence.

    I've also had several students come to me still struggling to blend simple CVC words!
     
  15. teacherSMK

    teacherSMK Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Messages:
    886
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 15, 2012

    My daughter is entering 2nd this year. I have worked with her a lot this summer, but she is still struggling to read. I am hoping that something clicks soon. She does very well with cvc's. She struggles the most with comprehension. I pray everyday that she does better this year.
     
  16. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,884
    Likes Received:
    1,803

    Aug 15, 2012

    Remember, when a student struggles like this often they exhibits behaviors not typical of other students. They know they struggle and it impacts the way the react in the classroom. Also, kids that struggle to learn to read CAN have other co-morbid disabilities that are hidden or sometimes just ignored.

    Keep in your mind that these parents may be difficult because they don't trust the school. Or they may just believe that eventually their child will just figure it out (which I may remind everyone was the very normal stance from schools a decade ago). Schools consistently told parents not to worry if children weren't reading until they were in at least beginning of 4th grade becase some kids just took longer to read then it clicked and they had no problems later. That is mostly crud, but hey, it worked for them. Let's take that small margin of successes and present it as the norm.

    Try to determine where their emotions lie on this issue so you know how to approach the issue. Find out from last year's teacher if she tried to put the child up for evaluation.
     
  17. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    4,858
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 15, 2012

    I had a student in summer school this summer who had finished 2nd Grade and couldn't read anything. He was retained in 2nd, but without some kind of intervention-I don't see how he'll improve. I worked with him individually for almost 20 days, using lots of different strategies and his test results actually went down by the end of the month. :(
     
  18. a2z

    a2z Maven

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    5,884
    Likes Received:
    1,803

    Aug 15, 2012

    That doesn't surprise me, Kinder. Often different strategies will do nothing but confuse a struggling student, particularly if they have an underlying disability because not only are they supposed to learn the content but the strategy (process) continually changes.

    That is often why quality reading program for students with disabilities such as dyslexia are so structured and repetative.

    Also, unless you really know the underlying deficit, it can be near impossible to implement the proper program. A great example is a student that needs the Lindamood Bell program LIPS to learn the letter sounds. This program focuses on coupling the sensory of how to make the sounds with the association of the letters required to make those sounds.

    I admire all of the work you did with the child. Sure wish you would have found that right help he needed. It is sad he won't have intervention in addition to retention.
     
  19. queenie

    queenie Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,392
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 15, 2012

    I had a couple kids last year that OBVIOUSLY weren't ready for second grade, based on their reading skills. They were placed back into first grade after about a week. It's obvious this year that it was the BEST decision! One is now on level and the other is just below.

    In our district, we can only retain a child once in the primary grades (K-2) and once in the intermediate grades (3-5) whether they are capable of doing the work (or reading) or not. :confused:
     
  20. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    Messages:
    950
    Likes Received:
    29

    Aug 15, 2012

    Absolutely. What reading level is he at right now?

    A *lot* of kids, especially boys, have reading click for them around the middle of second grade. I have seen it over and over. For some reason, many times these kids are also late to lose their teeth.

    Barring a learning disability, most kids I've had are reading close to grade level by the end of second even if they come in well below.
     
  21. Danny'sNanny

    Danny'sNanny Connoisseur

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    1,912
    Likes Received:
    14

    Aug 15, 2012

    I've had one every year.
    We are a really highly-performing school, and our state allows open enrollment. So a lot of times parents either notice their kid is struggling and come to us, or don't like what the last school said and are moving from school to school each year.

    I have one new student that started two days ago. I realized today that he's been copying his name from his name tag, when we were in a different classroom for a special he couldn't write his name! Yikes! I knew he couldn't read most pre-primer sight words, but really, his first grade report card showed him doing fine (different school). How can anyone think that not being able to spell your name is fine?!?!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Linguist92021,
  2. CaliforniaRPCV,
  3. TnKinder
Total: 354 (members: 5, guests: 329, robots: 20)
test