non graded special education classroom

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by SpecialEducator, Sep 17, 2006.

  1. SpecialEducator

    SpecialEducator Rookie

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    Sep 17, 2006

    Hi all
    I've been reading posts trying to find anyone in a similar situation as I am. I teach special education students who are in a non graded setting. They are 17-19 years old but academically are at a preschool and lower level. The materials I come across that are for their learning level are not age appropriate. The materials for a high school student are way too high academically for them. Does anyone know where I can find ideas and resources to use with them? I see all these web sites with great ideas but I cannot use them for my students. Any leads will help...THANKS!!!
    P.S. I do have some materials from the administration but they do not have much.
     
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  3. ellen_a

    ellen_a Groupie

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    Sep 17, 2006

    What type of content materials are you looking for? Anything specific? I'm glad to suggest some stuff if I can. :D
     
  4. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    Sep 17, 2006

    Have you looked in the Remedia catalogue?
     
  5. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    What CITY/STATE are you in and is this a public school?
     
  6. SpecialEducator

    SpecialEducator Rookie

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    Thank you, ellen. I'm particularly interested in living skills although I'm also looking for activities in all areas, particularly math and language arts. Their skills are extremely limited and half the class is limited physically as well. I just feel like I should be doing more with them, even though we are busy all day. Thank you for any ideas you have.
     
  7. SpecialEducator

    SpecialEducator Rookie

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    Sep 17, 2006

    I'm in a NYC public school, district 75 (special ed.). I've been to the web site and they have information and alternate books but I was looking for more. I didn't check Remedia catalogue but I will, thanks!!
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Sep 17, 2006

    Although I work with younger students (up to grade 8) we have found some success with ESL materials as they are very visual, and have high interest/low vocab.
     
  9. ellen_a

    ellen_a Groupie

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    The Remedia catalogue is a good start--other catalogues I'd request are PCI, Lakeshore (all ages, including the adult learner option), and Abilitations. From PCI, I like and have had success with Cooking 2 Learn, and their menu math programs (I incorporate calculator skills).

    One general rule that I have is if I see a book on money, time, or a similar "life skill" then I buy it--especially when its on sale. Even if I can't use it "straight" it gives me ideas. Some of the older teacher resources for money are MUCH more age-appropriate for this level than the newer resources you can buy today.

    Some specific books I would recommend, coming off my bookshelf are:

    Visual Recipes: A Cookbook for Non-Readers (Tabitha Orth)--beautiful cookbook, photograph based, simple meal prep (i.e. oatmeal, grilled cheese, etc.). I also used to use simple cookbooks like microwave cookbooks or cookbooks for sandwich makers to teach simple safe cooking skills.

    Evan-Moor "Look Listen & Speak" Series--this is a series of teacher resource books + interactive cd-rom intended for ESL students, GREAT simple, low-level vocabulary building activities that focus on authentic environments (i.e. one is all grocery store words), they have a farm book, a community/neighborhood book, etc.

    Evan-Moor Authentic Reading Practice 1-3--huge collection that targets real-life reading skills (is also sold as smaller volumes sometimes, be careful you don't double-buy like I did!). I pick and choose from this book, but do like their section on grocery store vocabulary (including sorting activities, aisle activities, etc.), computer vocabulary (very age-appropriate), and some of their cooking skills sheets. There are some map skills, reading mail, etc., but you really would need to pick and choose. I like this book because the one I do pick are not TOO ADVANCED for most of my guys--not TOO heavy on writing, etc.

    TCM Early Childhood Themes Using Art Masterpieces and MaryAnn F. Kohl's Discovering Great Artists are good jumping off pieces for your art projects--bring in a nice big version of a masterpiece (definitely age-appropriate), have some disucssion, and students can try that style of art. Could lead to some nice content-area connections too.

    Learning Resources Money Activity Book (Grades K-4)--COMPLETELY AGE APPROPRIATE AND WONDERFUL FOR DRILL/PRACTICE. You should buy the coin stamps to go with this resource. My kids LOVED these pages (and I'm not sure why--they're actually kind of boring) but they really reinforce money skills. Some of my guys used money calculators to double-check their responses as well.

    TCM has (or maybe had?) a series of Cut-and-Paste books--you have to pick and choose from these as well. The math tends to be very cutesy, but the science is VERY age-appropriate and I liked some of the langauge arts for review.

    Scholastic Real-Life Writing Activities based on Favorite Picture Books is nice--I've used this, and some of the picture books, with adults with developmental disabilities, and they have been very receptive and I've had good results. We did an activity with a book written of postcards, then wrote and mailed post cards, etc. It is authentic writing, the books are really just the model, I like it though.

    You can also usually find some stuff on maps, newspapers, etc. that can sometimes be helpful on a pick-and-choose basis.

    One series I would stay away from, unless your guys are pretty high functioning, are the Carson-Dellosa Real World Reading Comprehension (relatively new series, I have grades 1-2 and 3-4)--very abstract, even my "highest" kids really struggled. Too many words on the page, too many questions, etc.
     
  10. SpecialEducator

    SpecialEducator Rookie

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    thank you, mrs. c. I do have access to esl materials. i will give it a shot. :0)
     
  11. SpecialEducator

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    Thank you, Ellen. I just printed your entire reply. I'm sure I will find help there. Thank you again!!! :0)
     
  12. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Sep 18, 2006

    Hey since you are in NYC you are eligible for www.donorschoose.org or at least you should be--- they are a VALUABLE resource--- just don't put to many things on your first few proposals so they get funded--- That's why I asked. I teach ECSE so many of my things are to babyish for adults--- Actually probably all---
     
  13. kc2cfh

    kc2cfh Rookie

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    Sep 18, 2006

    Hi. I used to teach in District 75 with a similar population and I loved it! What school are you teaching in? I would definitely use Remedia. I have also used a lot of the books found in WalMart for lower levels. They are very reasonably priced and I found the students liked using their resource books. The key is to use high interest, low readability materials (restaurant menus, food circulars, phone book ads, coupons, travel brochures, etc.). These are great because they connect the words with pictures. Also, check out lindaslinkstoliterature.com. It's a $20 subscription, but well worth it for your classroom as they give you thousands of projects that have to do with any book you can think of. Hands-on, interdisciplinary projects are great.

    Also - use things like United Streaming which streams video into the classroom so students can visualize what you are discussing.

    The newspaper is also a wonderful tool.

    Good luck and have fun!
     
  14. SpecialEducator

    SpecialEducator Rookie

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    Thank you for that link- I am going to check it out. :0)
     
  15. SpecialEducator

    SpecialEducator Rookie

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    Sep 18, 2006

    Thank you, kc. I also love the class I'm in. I just worry that I don't have enough ideas to keep them busy. My mentor was in today and said I'm doing fine, but of course I still worry. :0) I will definitely check out all the links you suggested. Thanks again!!!
     

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