NOISY KIDS!

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by Steelers86, Sep 8, 2010.

  1. Steelers86

    Steelers86 Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2010

    My students are so talkative this year, even during direct instruction. They are really having difficulty focusing and staying quiet. I try to break up direct instruction time with engaging activities because I know that they have a short attention span however it is not working. I am trying strategies to get there quiet such as 123 eyes on me and clapping patterns but as soon as we are finished they are right back to talking with neighbors. I've had several students can cards which results in a loss of recess time but it isnt being affective. Does anyone have any ideas to get control and to have them follow along and not talk?? I have never had this problem before!!
     
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  3. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Sep 8, 2010

    Are they talking about what you're teaching and what they're learning? Or are they talking about rainbows and monster trucks?
     
  4. Steelers86

    Steelers86 Rookie

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    Sep 8, 2010

    They are talking about everything but what we're doing!!
     
  5. Lysander

    Lysander Companion

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    Sep 9, 2010

    I started my kids in groups this year, but my kids were chatty, so I moved them into rows. At this point in the year, they can't handle cooperative groups. The rows helped quite a bit. There were still some talkers, so I also have table (row) points. When I see a whole table doing something good (quietest, straightest row, first with books out AND quiet, etc.) I give the row a point. The row with the most points at the end of the week gets a prize from the treasure chest (Dollar store trinkets).

    My class is also working on earning a class reward. I have a Connect Four board at the front of the room. When the class gets a compliment for something, we get a checker. When the checker board is full, we have a "Checker Party." This is popcorn and Kool-Aid and a video during science one day. (The video is usually a Magic Schoolbus that just happens to go with our science curriculum).
     
  6. hojalata

    hojalata Comrade

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    Sep 11, 2010

    Here's my take on it. At the beginning of 1st grade they might not have developed the skills yet to stop themselves from talking. I think you should teach it as a skill. Model for them what they should be saying inside their heads: "Oh, I want to talk to my neighbor so much right now! I want to know if he wants to play tag at recess! But....sigh..... I know it's not a good time right now. I guess I'll have to ask later." Model this and work with this a lot. If kids are talking, ask, "uhoh, where is that voice in your head telling you it's not a good time!" Some students might need a physical reminder that it's no a good time to talk. Maybe suggest they take the hand they're not writing with and keep it over their mouth as a physical reminder it's not a good time to talk. Eventually, as they develop, hopefully they wouldn't need that anymore.

    I know it probably wouldn't be such a quick fix as using a reward/punishment system, but I think the effect would be longer-lasting.
     
  7. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Sep 11, 2010

    great ideas hojalata! Thanks.
     
  8. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Sep 11, 2010

    When I teach my quiet signal, I also teach them to quietly wait for me to start talking.

    This creates a brief pause - 3 to 5 seconds - where they have to sit and focus on me without me talking. Then I start talking in a very quiet voice.

    Talking in a very quiet voice is counter-intuitive and often very difficult to do. But it requires them to be very quiet in order to focus on you.

    I don't use "123 eyes on me" as a quiet signal because I don't think it works very well. I have multiple signals I teach that I use in varied situations:

    I say "copy my hands(s)" and hold up one or both hands in with alternating numbers of fingers displayed.
    They have to mirror what I do. I use both hands if I also want them to put down their pencils, crayons, math manipulatives etc. They like it because it's actually challenging especially with both hands. This one is good because it requires them to look at you. The only problem is that they can still talk while doing it.

    I say "Yo Yo" and the kids respond with "What's up?"
    First I say it in a teacher voice a few times. Once I have them paying attention, I whisper it. finally I "lip sync" the words and they do the same. Very good for times when there's a lot of activity and/or noise because it gets their attention and effectively interrupts any conversations they may be having. Disadvantage are that it uses voices and the kids don't actually have to look at you or put down anything in their hands.

    "If you can hear me...." followed by touch your forehead, touch your chin etc.
    I always finish with "do this..." followed by a hand signal or gesture they need to copy. Often, I will raise both hands and wiggle my fingers in order to get them to put down objects and then fold my hands in front of me in order to get them to do so as well. The disadvantage of this quiet signal is that it's not a real good attention getter - you can easily run out of physical things for them to do before they are quiet. However, it does work very well after clapping patterns and "Yo Yo ..."

    Two more things about quiet signals:

    There should be some motivation for them to not have you giving quiet signals every two minutes. Whatever class incentive you have should be tied to being able to go X amount of time without having to make them get quiet. They have to learn that quiet signals mean they have to be quiet for a good period of time after you give the signal.

    Finally, ignoring the quiet signal altogether should be one of the more serious offenses in your classroom. To me, it falls under "disrespect" and I have actually sent strongly worded letters/emails to parents and even referred kids to the vp for it. They can easily lose their recess for ignoring the quiet signal and know that doing so will instantly turn me into a very mean and grumpy teacher.
     
  9. prek176

    prek176 Companion

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    Sep 13, 2010

    Wonder what it is....I've never had a class as noisy as this year's. They talk when I'm giving directions. They fail to read the body language and cues that most of my kids in the past have been able to pick up on. It is unbelievable!

    I too am having them work on a class reward for responding appropriately to my request for quiet during instruction. I do like the Connect Four idea and may try it the next time around.
     
  10. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Oct 7, 2010

    I have a very chatty, crazy class. It is my first year. I am still having a ton of trouble, but it's getting better. I too have a class incentive and I also have it by groups. The quietest groups during transitions and during activities get a sticket on their chart and the group that fills it up eventually gets a reward of some sort.

    I also have a behavior mangement system that leads to consequences. In addition though, I have "prize dollars" that I hand it. It works VERY well. I have 30 students and I usually hand out probably 50-70 dollars per day. It is a lot of dollars to hand it but it really works. I give dollars out to quiet students/those that are paying attention & listening, and I also often give out dollars to students who answer questions correctly. When I have this incentive almost the entire class wants to raise their hand and participate. I tell them that I'm not going to call on you and give you a dollar if you aren't quiet. That often gets them quiet. I started the dollars a couple weeks ago and it's really been working. But since I have to give out SO many dollars per day to make it effective, the prizes that they can buy are very expensive. (I charge $20-30 for a small pencil or eraser)
     
  11. miss_ali1984

    miss_ali1984 Companion

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    Oct 8, 2010

    I would hope that maybe later in the year their little light bulbs will turn on and they'll become more sensitive to the way you show them you want them to be quiet.
     

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