Noise / Listening Level Chart

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by MusicMaker, Jan 31, 2007.

  1. MusicMaker

    MusicMaker Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jan 31, 2007

    Does anyone have suggestions for a Noise / Respect / Listening Level Chart to put on a whiteboard in the front of a classroom?

    I currently use tally marks for students and table groups to earn points for prizes (lunch with teacher, homework pass, extra recess).

    I have been talking to the kids about the noise level, listening, and respect. They really seem to understand when I point my hand low to the ground (not listening), medium (so-so), and higher (great listening). I want to incorporate this onto the whiteboard, so the kids know where they need to be. I was thinking about a sad face, straight, and smiley... They really seem to respond better to visual things instead of me talking at them so much. Suggestions?
     
  2.  
  3. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    9,154
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jan 31, 2007

    No suggestions for that, but if you don't mind spending the money they have a yakker tracker (looks like a traffic light) that actually lights up and changes color when they reach certain preset noise levels. Kinda neat!
     
  4. MusicMaker

    MusicMaker Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2006
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2007

    I ended up making 3 faces - a green smiley face, a yellow straight face, and a red sad face. If they get to red, they lose a point. If they get to green, they earn a point. Points are used whole group for extra recess or other activities.

    This seems to help with the noise level and respect issues. Although, I feel like I'm reinforcing it until I'm blue in the face.

    It's just been one of those weeks and sometimes I feel like I can't do it. I don't get a lot of mentor support in my school and that's really frustrating as a first year teacher. :confused:
     
  5. mr jawsman

    mr jawsman Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2007

    Might work might not, but when you have to change the visual, make everyone put all pencils down and stop everything they are doing, then milk out the dramatic pause. Works for me, just a basic "stop everything" until I say so.

    I taught ED high school for 6 years, and this is my fifth year LD elementary. I had a real bad day recently, and went on my treadmill that night all angry and stressed out. Then I burst out laughing when I realized it was just a bunch of little second graders. LOL. Went back the next day and made them put down all materials and stare at me in silence. Next, I gave each kid a card on a chart with their nickname on it, and held a bunch of slips of colored paper. I explained I would slide a piece of the paper behind the names of rule-following students. After they earn four slips, they can use a computer. It takes a whole period to get a slip, and they don't mind that it takes about one week of excellent behavior to earn computer time. (I don't remove the paper for bad behavior, just let them accumulate).

    You can really spread out the number of needed "tallies" if you find the rewards are too frequent. I find the kids just like having lots of slips behind their names (like pride points or something).

    After eleven years, I've learned they really just like little visual tokens of achievement (stickers, green cards, stars, A+'s, smiles on their work, etc.) more than gifts or treats. Especially if they can watch their progress grow.

    Meanwhile, I want to check out that noise meter thing for my afternoon 5th graders! They are really nice, but a little too loud when doing wordwall activities, whisper reading, etc.

    Mike
     
  6. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Messages:
    2,699
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2007

    I bought a stop light decorative that I just have up on the whiteboard. I attached velcro dots by each light and attached an arrow. Whenever the voice level expectation changes (red-no talking, yellow- whisper voice, green- classroom voice) I change the stoplight. I used it a lot at the beginning but now I'm phasing it out, unless the kids have a problem with their voice level on certain areas of the day. I have one kid who was talking in the morning during announcements/morning work.... and said, "But the light was on yellow!!! That means I can whisper!!!!" when she totally knew the expectation from the beginning of the year that it was a no talking time. :rolleyes:
     
  7. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Messages:
    2,699
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 2, 2007

    As for listening, I have a poster that says, "Rules for Good Listening." It has a boy sitting at his desk with areas labeled, "Eyes watching, Ears listenining" etc etc.
     
  8. Youngteacher226

    Youngteacher226 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2006
    Messages:
    2,048
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 3, 2007

    Miss Kirby, I have the same poster. It really helped in the beginning of the year. It actually still comes in handy when they seem to forget how to "get ready". I say, "Show me the rules for good listening". Or "Show me 5". And they always look right at this poster.
    I also use a red, yellow and green stop light that I made out of paper plates and construction paper. Red is silence, yellow is whisper and green is talk quietly. I used a clothespin to move to diff. levels. But unfortunately, I have not been using it at all! I think that I will re-introduce this to my class because they can get chatty at times. But the noise level "visual" does always help. And lots and lots and lots of modeling and practicing.
     
  9. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Messages:
    2,699
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 3, 2007

    I think they need to make a rules for good listening poster for sitting on the carpet...
     
  10. Mrs LC

    Mrs LC Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Messages:
    310
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 3, 2007

    I have a "Decibel Clock" in my classroom. It's a circle with four quadrants - Silence, Whispering to Neighbours, Small Group Talk and Normal Speaking Voices. Then there is a wheel with a quarter cut out that goes over the clock face, to expose one of the levels.

    I only use "Silence" for tests and individual reading. The normal talking voices is usually reserved for lunchtime (we eat in the classroom for 10 minutes before they head outside) and wet or extreme weather days (like over 42 degrees) when the kids must stay inside over the break.

    The clock is a handy reminder and enables non verbal cues to be given (ie I just point to it!).

    Students who transgress in a minor way several times, or in a major way once, get their name up, which is a warning the first time, detention the second. Not too many kids require detention for this type of thing.
     
  11. mr jawsman

    mr jawsman Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 3, 2007

    These are great ideas!

    I'm gonna make a visual for appropriate "decibels" levels, adjacent to my behavior chart. I will make it science-based, since I have to do some across-the-curriculum stuff.

    LOL, I will draw a good little kid doing seatwork on the far left, and a jet airplane on the far right. The stuff in the middle will range from whisper-reading through gym class. Our PA system will go to the right of the Jet (hehe).

    Thanks,

    Mike
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Iris1001
Total: 279 (members: 3, guests: 249, robots: 27)
test