NO SUCCESS FINDING A JOB! SO IRRITATING!

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by JXG, Jan 14, 2015.

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  1. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

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    Feb 10, 2015

    Bros, you seem to have an excuse for everything. I'm sorry about your struggles, but you have to quit making excuses, it's not going to get you anywhere. Like someone else suggested, start looking into programs and taking advantage of things that may help you get where you need to be.
     
  2. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Feb 11, 2015

    Could you PM them to me? I have not been able to find much information on programs I would qualify for outside of my county's paratransit that would be able to assist with transportation. I contacted my DVR counselor and he stated that they do not help with transportation and that he did not know of any form of transportation for people with disabilities.

    Let's see, let's say they live in a suburb 50 miles from the center of Manhattan by car, or around 1 1/2 hours by transit.

    That's like 2-5 dollars in tolls, excluding the GWB (I think that's the one with the $15 fee into the city). So let's say $20 to drive into the city, $25 total for the day in tolls.

    Let's say their car gets 25 mpg, so 4 gallons of gas a day roundtrip, let's say gas is $2.18 (The national average, even though in NJ it is $2.03). So they spend around $9.00 a day on gas, so it costs them $34 a day to commute (assuming they have somewhere to park and that it doesn't cost them extra). So that's $170 a week, or around $700 a month (as months have different amount of work days).

    So when you compare it to your second example, $400 a month for public transit doesn't seem that bad, other than the very big downside of a four hour roundtrip commute.

    At most, I would be willing to do a 2.5-3 hour roundtrip commute (By public transit, which, outside of the major train lines, is rather horrible. Did you know it takes around 6 hours to get from Monmouth County, NJ to Atlantic City by public transit? It's a 1.5-2 hour car ride). Any more than that and I wouldn't be able to see when leaving for work or when I get home.

    I am not making excuses. I am simply justifying my reasoning on certain things.

    So what, you're saying I should've gone to an interview to be a substitute teacher while having an EEG on my head for three days, unable to bathe?

    That'd make a great first impression for sure. Seeing a prospective employee with wires coming off of his scalp, hooked up to a box that is stored in a stocking and stuffed in a fanny pack.

    What do you expect me to do? Move all the way across the country just because there's a teaching job there? Move away from my entire support system and network of physicians just to get a job?

    No job is worth that.

    I am already a client of the NJ Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, they are utterly useless in helping me find a job - they have assisted in no capacity whatsoever, despite such promises when I became a client (When I have brought these up, they give evasive answers like "What? We have never done that!" or "What? I never said that." or "We don't provide that service to college graduates."

    My college has a career services webpage with job listings that haven't been updated since 2006 or 2010 (depending on what part of the site you look at).

    Social Security can't help me until I get a job - as that is what their employment supports/Ticket to Work programs are for - so if someone works enough to hit the Substantial Gainful Activity point, they might be able to reduce their earnings through any impairment related work expense, provided they are approved by the SSA.

    You think I haven't looked into programs? I've been looking into programs since I learned about SSI at 18. There's not much in the way of assistance for people with disabilities until they are one of two things:
    1. Not participating in the workforce, then they qualify for things such as SSI, Section 8 Housing, and other such programs to aid individuals with disabilities.
    2. Participating in the workforce, then they qualify for programs that allow them to keep things like Medicaid until they hit a certain threshold (paying a premium for it after a certain point, of course).

    There aren't really any programs for people attempting to enter the workforce. I've applied for various jobs outside of education - haven't heard anything back from those. Applied to a job for some education-related position at a museum in NYC today, maybe that'll pan out, probably not though, it was posted on the federal jobs website.

    There aren't really any active disability advocacy or disability rights groups in NJ that help people with disabilities find jobs.

    There's a reason why the unemployment rate for people with disabilities is more than double that of non-disabled persons.

    68.2% of people without a disability participate in the workforce versus 19.6% of people with a disability who are participating in the workforce.

    However, that includes everyone 16-65+, so let's check the 16-64 stats.

    For non-disabled men 18-64, 81.7% participate in the labor force. For disabled men 18-64, 33.6% participate.

    For non-disabled women 18-64, 69.9% participate. For disabled women 18-64, 28.0% participate.

    The aforementioned statistics are here
     
  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Feb 11, 2015

    bros--several of us have said many times over the past few years that we feel you would be an exceptional advocate. Your last post shows that there is, obviously, a need for those services in your area (I find it so difficult to believe that none of those services exist--not that I don't believe you, just can't believe that in 2015 there isn't available support).
     
  4. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Feb 11, 2015

    Bros, just thought I would solve one of the problems that you have been telling us about for years (that prevents you from being independent). Took .02 seconds on google.

    http://www.magnaready.com/shop/home.php
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 11, 2015

    Seems like a perfect fit while classroom teaching doesn't.
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Feb 11, 2015

    We have Disability Rights New Jersey, a non-profit, private, consumer directed organization that advocates for and advances the human, civil, and legal rights of citizens of NJ with disabilities. Promotes public awareness and recognition of individuals with disabilities as equally entitled members of society. Advise and assist persons with disabilities, family members, attorneys, and guardians, They also provide education, training, and technical assistance to people with disabilities, the agencies that serve them, advocates, attorneys, professionals, courts, and others.

    None of their programs are use use to me at this time, as they mostly relate to legal assistance.

    There's the ARC of NJ, but that isn't really for people with disabilities like mine.

    Then there's the various groups set up for various disabilities (epilepsy, cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorders) that are more for raising awareness of the disabilities, rather than providing long term assistance.

    Perhaps this summer I will look into COPAA's Advocate Training, but I would have to save money without running afoul of the SSA.

    I am aware of those, but I am unsure about their use in my situation as I do not believe any of the clothes offerings they have would fit me - a men's small might be too large for me. I wear like a boy's 14 or 16 dress shirt, I believe.

    Why doesn't classroom teaching seem like a good fit for me? Because I can't write? Because I have to come up with interesting and engaging ways to integrate technology into my lessons?
     
  7. bartleby

    bartleby Rookie

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    Feb 11, 2015

    I haven't read through all five pages of the thread, I just did a quick "Search This Thread" for "online" and did not find anything. Have you been exploring options for teaching online? It may not be what you want to do long-term, but perhaps you can find something that will bring in some money in the meantime, and no commute necessary. Just food for thought. Again, sorry if it has been discussed.
     
  8. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Feb 11, 2015

    As far as clothing to fit you, I sent the website to you to show you the alternatives to needing someone to button the shirt for you. It is obvious that clothing exists that can be modified for people with your particular disability. What is your excuse...it may not be small enough. C'mon, have a seamstress alter the shirt! You would need no help getting dressed, then.

    Why doesn't classroom teaching seem a good fit? Maybe because you refuse to get off your butt and spend some money getting experience!

    Has it been three years or so here that we have been giving good, solid advice to help you become more independent and get a job? I am now joining the ranks of those here who will no longer offer any more advice to someone who refuses to take the advice.
    Good luck.
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Feb 11, 2015

    bros--The agencies in existence aren't providing the services you need, and are entitled to (in my opinion). I'm sure you aren't the only one. I'm sure that a private advocate would be in high demand.
     
  10. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    Feb 11, 2015

    So you applied for a museum job in NYC. Why not a teaching job in NYC? Obviously you looked into commute times. We have a shortage of special education teachers. Surely you can attempt to apply and possibly find a job here.

    Start looking into getting a certification for NYS.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 11, 2015

    I don't think you fully realize the stress potential in the current education climate. Bros, you have written here of having anxiety over interviews, talking with adults...add in PARCC, CCSS, tenure reform, new teacher eval systems and it becomes enough to stress out even seasoned and confident teachers. Then layer that on top of your admitted struggles with classroom mgt, physical limitations, 'gaps' in math skills, dysgraphia/OT issues, accommodations requirements, parent expectations....if that doesn't daunt you, know that it does cause potential employers to doubt you could do this and best serve students. Again, this is not about YOU, its about the kids. You need A LOT of experience, confidence building and growth in capability in order to be considered a competitive candidate....and even then it's going to be tough.
     
  12. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Feb 12, 2015

    From looking at the... substantial certification requirements, it seems like it would be better to get certified in NYS after getting a job in NJ, if that were to interest me.

    Anxiety over interviews is completely normal.

    My gaps, where my mathematics based LD kick in, are beyond what I would teach in an elementary setting.

    My accommodations would be relatively simple and very reasonable. I have to have technology in the classroom - if they don't have it, i'm willing to provide it. Which is a very simple request given the rise of technology in schools. I have difficulty standing for long periods of time, but I can deal with that by sitting down every once in a while and arrange in the desks/classroom in a way so I could roll the chair at my desk to students who needed help, if I really needed to stay seated.
     
  13. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    Feb 12, 2015

    But you aren't getting a job in NJ right now. I'm sorry just another excuse. You can get to NYC, you can apply for certification. You just don't want to. Always an excuse as to why sitting at home waiting for a job to open up in the 9 districts near you, instead of proactively applying for other teaching jobs you can definitely get to.

    And I bet your next excuse will be that the tests are expensive. Well, you should be saving up from whatever income you have coming in from disability or taking a side job like tutoring to make it happen or ask someone to lend you money to invest in your future.

    What's your excuse now, bros?:2cents:
     
  14. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Feb 12, 2015

    bros, I think online teaching would definitely be a path to consider.
     
  15. bros

    bros Phenom

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    The tests are rather expensive, and there's something called the edTPA which sounds rather laborious/similar to what I had to do during my student teaching.

    I've looked for tutoring jobs on sites where parents hire tutors, the typical response is usually "We only want a girl."

    I've applied to actual tutoring places - no response.

    I am not allowed to save money that I get from SSI. It is literally prohibited - you cannot have more than $2000 in resources. I already have $1800 in "resources" that would be incredibly unwise to touch at this time (primarily savings bonds). So I can only have $200 in my bank account at a time, or else I lose SSI. So yeah, not going to lose my SSI to take some tests that I would have to take a train into the city to take. Then it'd take like 8-10 weeks to get accommodations.

    The fact of the matter is I do not have any desire whatsoever to teach in a city.

    I think there's only one online school in NJ - it covers students in grades 6-12. I believe there were supposed to be two online charter schools that were supposed to open, then the state DoE shot them down.
     
  16. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    Feb 12, 2015

    Because you've never thought of saving money and not putting it in a bank?

    I'm sure there's some kind of reciporcity between NJ and NY.
    http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres...-36A128809C90/0/InterstateReciprocityList.pdf

    You don't have the desire to teach in the city, even to get experience? I'm sorry 99% of teachers do not land a suburb teaching position without either,experience, student teaching in the district, subbing or "having an in". I'm sure that rare cases which is why I leave the 1% but I haven't heard of it.

    But yet you'll travel to the city for a museum job. Doesn't make sense.
     
  17. K-5_teacherguy

    K-5_teacherguy Companion

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    Feb 12, 2015

    This is 100% accurate in my experience as well.
     
  18. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

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    I guess I'm in the 1% then. It does happen. I never made excuses. I worked my tail off to get my job. I subbed as much as I could for 2 large school districts. Put resumes out even when there wasn't an opening. I wanted a job so bad that I would go on wikipedia and look up NJ school districts and write out resumes. I was on njhire.com and njschooljobs.com all the time. I understand limitations, but you have to stop with the crap you can't do and figure out a way to focus on what you can.

    I am not here to offend, so please don't take my comments like that. I am trying to offer advice. If I made an excuse for everything that I went through while trying to look for a job I definitely wouldn't be where I'm at today.
     
  19. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    No...that puts you in the 99% who got experience...Subbing...etc....
     
  20. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Feb 12, 2015

    The climate in 2015 is WAY brighter than it was in 2008. In those days, THOUSANDS were being laid-off. That meant that before they even COULD consider a new candidate, they'd have to rehire people who were laid-off. If the current climate stays the way it is and you ARE worthy of being a classroom teacher, you'll probably be hired this next hiring season (or the next, if you can hang in... many opt to quit and move on).

    At least the door is open (slightly ajar). In 2008 the door wasn't even open. In fact, it wasn't even slammed shut. There was no door. It was a cement wall.
     
  21. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 12, 2015

    It wasn't too long ago that several people suggested that you look into hiring a private driver, someone looking to make a few dollars here and there, perhaps through something like Craigslist. I thought that it was a very reasonable suggestion at the time. Why isn't that an option for you? You could probably afford it and you wouldn't have to deal with excessive wait time that goes along with public transit schedules.


    I agree. Many programs allow you to teach in a state other than your state of residency as long as you are licensed in that state. Just last week I saw a "100% remote" job in my subject matter in a state clear across the country; any applicant with a teaching license in that state would be qualified for that position, even if they do not ever actually set foot in that state.
     
  22. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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    Feb 12, 2015

    Www.acsi.com

    This website lists job postings for christian schools in the US and internationally

    Good luck
     
  23. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Feb 13, 2015

    SSA monitors cash withdrawals from the bank account direct deposit is set up for. They have the right to contact my bank at any time without me knowing to see if I am over my resource limit or not.

    I am unsure if I understand this edTPA thing or not - I currently have a fever of 102 and am a bit.... testy. It seems like it is a case study of a special education classroom, then a recorded lesson. I had to do both of those for my student teaching, and depending on what the case study entails, what I had to do for my student teaching might... **** fever, can't think of the word... be an appropriate substitute? That seems like an awkward way to phrase it though. Hm. Still can't think of a way to phrase it right. ****.

    I student taught in the suburb where I live and I have an in for when a job is posted - but that is the issue - I need to wait for a job to be posted. Should probably ask my neighbor on the board of ed what is up with them not putting anyone on the sub list in 14 months.

    I'm pretty much on NJHire, NJSchooljobs, and k12jobspot for at least 2-3 hours a day. I also check the websites of smaller (like one-school school districts) around me, because they might not use those tools to post positions. I pretty much have two counties I can apply to jobs in that are a reasonable distance by taxi: Monmouth and Middlesex counties, then I can get to some other counties via train, but i'd have to find a school district within 5-7 miles of the nearest train station in order for it to be fiscally feasible as a full time job. Like i've applied for jobs in Union & Cranford because they are easy to access by train - never gotten calls back.

    It isn't like I am not applying to jobs either - I've received 122 emails from applitrack's mailbot since March 2014. Then there were probably around 15-20 where I had to email my resume, so let's just say 18, then we have a nice even 140 - or around 12 applications a month on average (with some months having more than others, some having less - like last month, there were only two jobs posted that I could apply to, and I applied to them).

    I probably would've gotten one of the jobs that I interviewed for during the summer if I wasn't shaking like a leaf in the chair the entire time because my dad had to get an emergency appendectomy.

    Although I don't understand why I didn't get the job I interviewed for last month - the interview lasted for like 45 minutes, things seemed to go well, and the interviewer seemed to like me. Maybe it was because I was the only person he interviewed - the principal interviewed every other candidate for the position.

    I'll try to find online teaching jobs, see if I can find anything.

    There is this program in NJ, but I am unsure as to if I would qualify, as I read a report I found online about it, and something like only 10,000 people in the state use it. Though that report was from like 2009 or 2010, but I doubt the number has ballooned since.

    http://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/dds/projects/pasp/index.html

    It's actually acsi.org - I checked the site, only job posting for NJ is a four hour commute by public transit that was posted in January. Also, I do not practice any religion, so that may be a point against me if I were to apply to a parochial school - but then again, all depends on the parochial school.
     
  24. SandyCastles

    SandyCastles Companion

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    There is a teacher who works at my school, an elementary school, and is in a wheelchair. She has a driver who takes her to and from school. She teaches from her wheelchair and has found a way to overcome her disability. It can be done.
     
  25. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Your NJ work as a student teacher will most likely not be an acceptable substitute for edTPA. I was a CT this fall for a great ST whose first license is in NY. Not only was there a taped lesson ( for which there were many guidelines), she had a very large written component (there was at least 40 pages involved) that was part of her package. There's a decent percentage of edTPA packages that don't pass muster.


    Your 'in' with the local school board has been played a few times. The board member might be more than happy to help you out again but trust me when I say those kinds of 'favors' don't always put a candidate in good stead at the school. You got placed for your ST but from your accounts here, it wasn't ideal and it does read like they were doing you a favor. If you truly were highly regarded there and impressed them with your ST experience you should be able to not only find out on your own about sub and job openings, but you would be at the top of the list for interviewing. My principal actually calls other districts for impressive newbies if we not have an opening but other districts do.
     
  26. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Surprised she doesn't drive herself. It's more than feasible for a person in a wheelchair to operate a motor vehicle, but everyone has their preferences, or there may be another factor in play.

    http://www.lsnjlaw.org/Pages/Non-Le...ation-Programs-Disabilities.aspx#.VN4mjPnF_PU

    The only options are paratransit, which as outlined previously, isn't feasible for someone working in my county and then reduced fare on the trains. NJ FindARide isn't very good - most of the taxi services they recommend no longer exist.

    http://www.njcost.com/

    That site is just poorly put together and has very little information that I didn't previously have.

    Well I had to record a lesson for my student teaching.

    And the written component for my student teaching was a ~50 page case study on the class I taught (I did it on the morning class, as it had to involve students with IEPs). I remember everything about my student teaching, so if need be, I could revise it to fit the edTPA requirements.

    The board member was not involved in my being placed in the district for student teaching. It was more the fact that the university screwed up, refused to read my forwarded emails from districts who said "Yeah, we don't have any technology in our classrooms because all of it got destroyed during Sandy, so right now we are teaching in an old church." and then a few days into the actual semester, went "Okaaaay, we'll place you in the district where you live."

    By then, all of the teachers who volunteer to take on student teachers had been taken, so [who later turned out to be] my morning cooperating teacher, begrudgingly took me on as a student teacher, unwilling to relinquish any more than the single subject she taught to me - wouldn't let me take over morning meeting despite multiple requests at various points (Because "she'd be bored with nothing to do all day").

    I student taught at the smallest school in the district where, realistically, I could never teach. The principal loved me being there and so did my afternoon cooperating teacher.

    Every time I have applied for a teaching job in the district, I have been called in for an interview.

    Granted, that was only two times, but I was called in both times.

    But a lot of the elementary teachers are slated for retirement this year, so hopefully i'll get something this year - last year, about 5-6 teachers were supposed to retire, but in the end, only two decided to retire - one position was filled from within the district (and the person's former position was eliminated) and the other was hired from outside the district.
     
  27. SandyCastles

    SandyCastles Companion

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    Like I said. If you want it badly enough you will figure it out. Who cares if "other people" do it one way. You know you can't so figure it out. Your excuses are poor and those other people are overcoming their challenges miles ahead of you. I don't have time to argue with you, especially because I know you will have a "poor me" retort- but just know, you can do it, and when you really are ready and want to, you will notice the difference in yourself. I hope that day comes for you.
     
  28. bros

    bros Phenom

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    My excuses are perfectly valid. The other situations given are not as severe as mine, nor are there as many factors working against them.

    http://www.civilrights.org/transportation/disability/facts.html
     
  29. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Bros..you find your excuses valid. You give job search advice to others despite not landing a job. You are sure your unconventional ST experience qualifies you for reciprocity in NY. You foresee openings in your home district for which you feel you have an 'in' but have yet to get an offer despite several interviews. How are you preparing to stand out in the next round of interviews? Are you ready to address CCSS, PARCC? How are you going to overcome objections and doubts? What is going to make you the 'must hire' over other candidates?
     
  30. bros

    bros Phenom

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    My experience itself was unconventional, but the requirements for what I had to do for the capstone were not - I had to complete the exact same requirements as any other student graduating from the Special Education program at my university. I was granted no leniency due to my unconventional placement (Other than a 1 week delay of the first part of the case study, as I hadn't been placed the class session before it was due, so the professor gave me a week delay until I was placed and I could write the first section). I didn't even need to use any of my accommodations beyond "Use of a computer" in the course.

    Honestly, I haven't gotten an offer in my home district because I was not suited for either of the jobs - they extended the interview as a courtesy because I student taught in the district, attended school in the district, and I know a member on the board of ed. One was for a 6th grade LAL/SS position (I was told before the interview it was going to be for a fifth grade LAL/SS position OR a third grade position) and the other was for an unspecified elementary position, which was filled by a para in the district after all of the interviews were conducted.

    I can address CCSS very well. I have never had issue with that. I have researched PARCC and I believe I would be able to answer questions on that - ask me some questions - haven't had a teaching interview since... November.

    What kind of objections/doubts may they have? My disabilities? I tend to be somewhat open in my interviews about my disabilities. I usually state that I have mild cerebral palsy (which is a diagnosis I have), which causes tremors (which are exacerbated by my anxiety, but I do not include that, nor the fact that one of my medications may be making the tremors look worse than they are) and primarily upper body muscle weakness, making it difficult for me to lift things and that I have a disorder of written expression, dysgraphia, which makes it difficult for me to write legibly, which I have overcome through my creative and varied uses of technology in the classroom.

    A lot of interviewers seem very impressed with the fact that I know how to use a SMART Board and create lessons on them, along with the fact that I have excellent general computer skills.

    I'd try to find a way to work my knowledge of sped law into my resume or interview, but that might seem tangential to the interview.
     
  31. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    You're going to need more than computer skills and Smartboard skills to stand out. Those are the norm these days.
     
  32. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

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    I think czacza was referring to the objections and doubts over the PARCC and CCSS. It's not being well received in my district and causing a lot of grief for the teachers and administration in our district.

    I was saying that I was in the 1% because I knew no one in my district, did not sub or student teach for them. I stood out on my interview and that is why I got the job (from what I was told after the fact). I had actually quit substituting by this time in all honesty because I did not find it to help me as much as everyone else thought. I did not believe in "putting my time in" for the district that I was subbing for. So I quit (but had 1.5 years experience subbing before that) and focused on putting out resumes & interviewing.
     
  33. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 14, 2015

    Jill, you were successful in securing your job most likely because, like most, you worked hard to get experience and were a compelling candidate who was able to demonstrate how your skills and education would fit the position when interviewed.

    It's not enough to simply 'read' about CCSS or PARCC. PARCC is causing a lot of stress for schools, teachers, parents and kids.There is NO WAY for someone sitting at home with no experience to understand the expectations, rigor and complexity of this current climate.
    It's unfortunately 'what we've got' right now and districts are going to look for candidates who can confidently navigate students through the standards and prepare kids for 'the tests'. Even pre-CCSS, administrators were looking for candidates who knew what to teach and how to teach it.

    As you know, these are not the only questions and concerns administrators have in mind, however, when interviewing candidates. They are looking for knowledgeable, experienced, intelligent teachers who can speak confidently and effectively about their practices, who can successfully manage classrooms of diverse learners, facilitate learning, collaborate with colleagues, connect with parents, and who come across as dynamic and engaging. It's a tall order, but one for which there are many highly qualified candidates who can 'take the ball and run with it' from day one. Administrators want to feel confident that they've made a great choice, have found a 'fit' and that the students will be well-served because of the hire.
    Bros, on your January 15 post in this thread you said you had been on an interview the week before. Was this not for a teaching position?
     
  34. bros

    bros Phenom

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    It was for a teacher assistant position at a private school for students with special needs - at the interview, I was told they were going to start looking for a new teacher perhaps for the next school year - as they were one more student enrolling in the school from needing to hire a new teacher. They never called me back about that interview and I thought I did really well and I would've been a great fit.
     
  35. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

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    Feb 14, 2015

    Maybe you don't interview well if you're not getting calls back.
    Do you send Thank you letters, do you follow up?
     
  36. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I email thank you letters when I have an email for the interviewer - however, in some cases, contact information is not available. I do not follow up because they said they will make a decision in x weeks/days.
     
  37. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

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    Contact info not available?? You were at the interview, right? Do you have an address and a name? You send a letter.

    Too many excuses. I don't believe you are cut out for this. Can you imagine all the demands on you once you get a job? It's overwhelming and stressful right now with all of the demands NJ is putting on teachers. My suggestion is to move on and look for something else if you're going to keep having excuses.
     
  38. SandyCastles

    SandyCastles Companion

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    :yeahthat::agreed:
     
  39. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    This is about being realistic,bros.
    You have no real experience with the rigor and demands of current standards and testing...only what you heard in a class or read online. You have no realistic, marketable classroom experience. Elementary school isn't what you experienced as a kid...nor is it what students experienced just a few years ago...and your ST experience did little to allow you to experience what real teaching in terms of real, hand on, active extended responsibilities (ie: planning and teaching an entire unit, teaching for an entire day/week(s), being solely responsible (with limited guidance) for the mgt of a classroom full of learners)
    In addition to more rigorous learning expectations, teaching IS physically demanding. From setting up a classroom in September to unpacking resources, navigating through classrooms and crowded hallways, managing materials...it's A LOT....
    No one here is saying it can't be done, bros, but these things DO weigh into the hiring decision. Administrators are going to have concerns and you really aren't bringing a lot to the table to over-ride those doubts. No experience, communication anxiety and speaking tone, physical limitations, knowledge gaps, confidence factors. You've got a lot of work to do to inspire administrators' confidence in your abilities to be a successful teacher. Because once again it's not about you...it's about what's best for student learning.
     
  40. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I can't send letters. My dad only buys the exact number of stamps he needs every weekend to mail bills out. No more, no less, otherwise he is "wasting money". Nobody else in the house except him is allowed to mail a letter, pretty much. My mom can't drive to the post office anymore.

    I honestly still do not understand the point of sending out a thank you note to someone who probably wouldn't even recognize you from a hole in the wall. It isn't done in other professions, why is something so archaic still done in education? I emailed thank you letters to the majority (read: all but one) interviewers that have interviewed me, and that one just decided to hire a para who quit the year before, then applied to the job and got higher pay for it. It's not like I didn't send one to the interviewers in the district I live in, and I sent one to the gentleman who interviewed me last month.

    I do not tell any interviewer about my mathematics based LD, as it is not something I require accommodations for, so they have no need to know about it ever.

    Physical limitations - that is as easy to get around in some cases, if I need to put up a bulletin board, a custodian could assist me.

    The biggest factor is my anxiety. In interviews, it has reduced since the first one, with the exception of the one during the summer where I was not able to curtail my anxiety due to aforementioned reasons. At most, my hands will move around a bit, no flapping or wringing, just heavy gesticulation - which in some people is a character trait. I will usually explain at the end of the interview (or if it comes up during the interview) the basics of my disabilities (I have lifting difficulties and motor difficulties, but I have overcome them through x, y, and z)
     
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