No Respect!

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by PinkFish, Mar 25, 2009.

  1. PinkFish

    PinkFish Rookie

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    Mar 25, 2009

    Hi everyone,

    I am a first year teacher (2nd grade) in a very poor district. I moved from small town Iowa and never in my life have I seen children as disrespectful as the students in my school. My students show me very little respect, I have to repeat myself several times before I get their attention. I have tried all sorts of behavior systems (tickets, charts, scoreboards, behavior plans, and notes home). Nothing seems to work! My kids are not overly bad but they are just so disrespectful and rarely stop talking. I am trying to find a system that works so that I can get it ready for next year, because I don't want to repeat the year that I have had this year. Does anyone have any ideas that work well for them?
     
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  3. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Mar 25, 2009

    As usual, I will suggest Power Teaching. If the kids do what you want, they win! Tons of resources on the nice new website.
     
  4. PinkFish

    PinkFish Rookie

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    Mar 25, 2009

    Can you give me the website or suggest some books on power teaching? I am very interested in looking at this for next year.
     
  5. Canadian Gal

    Canadian Gal Habitué

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    Mar 25, 2009

    If you go to the Professional Groups section of the website there is an entire message board dedicated to Power Teaching.

    I personally, am more of a Harry Wong kind of gal.
     
  6. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Mar 25, 2009

  7. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Mar 27, 2009

    You might also check out Tools for Teaching by Fred Jones.
     
  8. PowerTeacher

    PowerTeacher Comrade

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    Mar 27, 2009

    For a straight forward how to for beginning Power Teachers, and how to get started check here, and feel free to ask as many questions as you like.

    Oh, and by the way, Power Teaching and Harry Wong are perfectly compatible.
     
  9. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Apr 6, 2009

    Pinkfish,

    I think the students are aware that there are no consequences for their choices. Have you heard of a site called red and green choices? It's a wonderful way to introduce responsibility for students at a younger age and it allows them to control their own choices. Here is the link to the site:
    http://www.redandgreenchoices.com

    I have used this technique with students with autism and it works for some of them. It allows them to see what the choices are and that they make the choice and the consequences for their choice. It allows them to be in control of their own behavior and it doesn't allow you to be blamed. It's also great for sharing with parents too. Don't argue with the student, just show him what his choice was and that's the way it is!
     
  10. nattles19

    nattles19 Comrade

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    Apr 9, 2009

    I like "Setting Limits in the Classroom" by Robert Mackenzie (very big on natural/logical consequences).

    Also, "Positive Discipline in the Classroom" by Nelsen, Lott, and Glenn. It focuses a lot on building a positive classroom community, which is the foundation to having a respectful classroom.

    The book that changed my life, though, is called "21st Century Discipline" by Jane Bluestein. She talks about the difference between punishments and consequences, and how to motivate students to cooperate so that both your needs and their needs are met.
     
  11. letty21

    letty21 Rookie

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    Apr 24, 2009

    If the children are not doing their work and talking in class, call their parents or send them to the office with out the parents, and sit with your students and talk to them about why they are not listening to the teacher.

    Read all the rules over and over again, or tell your students take out a paper, and write down i will listen to the teacher. Tell them to write that 20times, than they will not want to be sent to the office, and they will also respect you more.
     
  12. skerns

    skerns Companion

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    Jun 16, 2009

    No Respect

    You are giving them too many chances before you act with a consequence. You should never repeat yourself more than twice. On the first week of school you need to take away something major without losing your temper. This works best right before a recess. Ex. Say, "please clean up your area or put your things away or clean off your desk", etc. Wait only one minute, if the entire class is not obeying, then in a louder voice, say "ok, please take out your spelling books recess has been lost." Give the reason, for not quickly obeying, then proceed with Spelling, no recess or break. If you do this only a couple of time, you will have very little problems throughout the school year with students listening quickly. When they become disrespectful again, just repeat these steps. Does this make sense?:confused: I really works and this was in a 5th/6th class. I also do it with kinder. Also never give an idle threat, always follow through with what you threaten, even if it is a field trip or something that you really didn't mean to take away.
     
  13. PreK3

    PreK3 Rookie

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    Jun 17, 2009

    I just read Ron Clark's 55 rules. I don't suggest you implement his 55 rules, but reading it helped me understand the importance of teaching respect and how he did it. It's a quick read, took me about an hour or so.
     
  14. ESteacher

    ESteacher Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2009

    When all else fails. ... CANDY! haha...

    Look, I'm not into 'extrinsic rewards' - but last year was my first year teaching. I was teaching emotional support in one of the more difficult schools in my district. Tickets, points, signals... all that went down the tubes. (Especially because I did not have a supportive administration or parental base.)

    So, after all else failed, I started a classroom store. Students were only permitted to go to the store at the end of the day IF they made the appropriate amount of points throughout the day. And for those who scored over a specific amount - they got to shop in the 'star bins' which held the more expensive candy... or 'the better stuff' as they called it.

    I liked this method because even though at first they were only driven by how much candy they could get... by the end of the year my students were genuinely treating each other better as human beings. Plus, you can design your point system to fit your room. If you want to give points for finishing assignments, manners, using appropriate language... or a combination of things, it is possible. AND once it becomes too 'easy' for students to reach the amt. of points needed for each day - you can simply up it. (Each time I up'd it... I would tell my students "thats it... I'm goin broke buying all this candy, I gotta make this a little harder, lets see if you can reach this...!" -they loved it, it became a challenge who could make their day.)

    I hope that works for you! Good luck this year!
     
  15. 1stgradersrock

    1stgradersrock New Member

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    Aug 11, 2009

    Stay positive!



    Last year was my first year teaching as well. I, too, had a TOUGH class. Disrespect is something the students have to learn just like everything else. ESPECIALLY if the parents have not made it a priority at home. Just stay consistent, and if the same student goes to the office more than once a week, so be it. Just stay consistent and don't let it get you down. Being mean is tiring, but if you start out mean...you can always get nicer (if you can!)
     
  16. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Aug 11, 2009

    Have you thought of using a Yacker Tracker so that they understand the consequences of talking and what it will do if they continue to talk? I would also find out who the main culprits are, there are usually a few. You can tell from the parents which kids are the most disruptive especially in an urban setting. They always have an EXCUSE why their child has problems listening. I would also try using Harry Wong's teaching methods. Have you tried http://www.redandgreenchoices.com
    It's a "visual" representation of their individual choices and the consequences for their choices that they make. It's been proven effective too.
     
  17. schoolteacher

    schoolteacher Habitué

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    Aug 11, 2009

    I would like to ask you if some teachers at your school seem to have students that are more respectful than yours?

    If that is the case, then it can be surmised that they are doing something differently than you, since you both have the same student population.

    I have worked in a very poor school, and it was amazing to go from one class to the next. One class would have students sitting quietly, listening very respectfully to the teacher, while the next class would have rampant disrespect, students running around the room.

    I would suggest reading Harry Wong's book, because it gives excellent advice on how to turn any group of students into respectful, caring learners.
     
  18. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Aug 11, 2009

    ???:unsure:
     
  19. Teechietech

    Teechietech Rookie

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    Sep 1, 2009

    I agree that you need to find a way to make it clear that there are real consequences to this kind of rude behavior. Hopefully your principal will back you up. Good luck!

    TT
     

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