No planning period. Anybody else?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by cafekarma, Sep 28, 2014.

  1. cafekarma

    cafekarma Rookie

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    Sep 28, 2014

    Hi all. I started a new job in a new state this year. It was very surprising to me when I learned that all teachers must join kids outside for recess, and we have structured meetings every day while kids are in specials. We take kids to lunch, and it takes awhile to have behavior under enough control to be able to leave the cafeteria. All in all, we are left with around 20 minutes of time to take care of odds and ends (turn in money orders, use the restroom, meet with an OT, eat something, etc.) I don't work with the easiest crew of kids. 98% of the kids in my school qualify for free/reduced lunch, and with that comes a lot of behavior issues to strategize through. Most of my students are working far below grade level. I knew what I was signing up for working with this demographic, and gladly embraced the challenge. I could even get used to the fact that we have somewhere between 2-5 training seminars every week. I just think that a planning period would be nice. My question is this: Is this becoming a new norm? Are there other teachers out there who have no planning period? I'm very curious. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Simply stated - yes, in many districts of public and private schools. What they do with the time may vary, but the fact that it is no longer your prep, well, that stays the same. So sorry. :sorry:
     
  4. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Sorry hear to hear that! One thing I love about my school is I am done teaching by 12:10. I might have recess duty after that (for second recess) and an occasional meeting, but I always have 12:10-1:10 as a planning period, and when my kids are in activities (1:40-2:25) unless I have a meeting during that time.
     
  5. Sugar

    Sugar Rookie

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    That seems to be the trend. The time is carved out in the schedule as planning, but it's up to the schools (apparently) how that time is used. I still get most of my plannings for my own needs and purposes.
     
  6. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I don't hear about it often here. We are a union state and abuse of our prep period is something I know our union would freak out about.
     
  7. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    This is the first year, ever, where my district guaranteed elementary teachers planning time. So far, I've actually mostly had my planning time, which I thoroughly appreciate.
     
  8. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I agree, this is becoming a trend. I am fortunate that I get to use my planning periods for what I need to do, most of the time.
     
  9. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    I recently switched districts, but at my old district our planning time was 8:15 to 8:45 every day (the half hour before we get the kids from the playground to bring them in for the morning) and had a 30 min during the day prep during the kids' special three days out of the week (though it's definitely more like a 25 min prep as you have to walk the kids to specials and pick them up). Meetings could happen up to twice per week during the 8:15 to 8:45 time. This year the three day "specials" prep has bumped up to four days. There is however a duty free lunch each day that's 40 min so even on a "no prep" day you still have those 40 min to eat and do other necessary stuff.
     
  10. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    That has always been the norm for North Carolina. If you are getting 20 minutes a day, you are lucky. I had 30 minutes three times a week.
     
  11. cafekarma

    cafekarma Rookie

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    Why is that, Giraffe? Did you have to eat lunch with your class on those other two days?
     
  12. StarsofTommorow

    StarsofTommorow Companion

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    I feel like a planning period is a necessity! Especially for a simple break and to rejuvenate before getting the kids back.
     
  13. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    I've only heard of that from teachers on the internet. It's not the norm around here. I would go crazy! Our planning time is in our contract.
     
  14. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    We get 50 minutes a day, protected by the union.
     
  15. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    I have a 40 minute duty free lunch and 40 minute prep every day. If I didn't work right through both of them, I'd probably be at school until 6 every night - at least.
     
  16. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    It's written into our contract that we get 10% of our contracted time as prep time. Also, they can't force us to do lunch duty and if we offer, we have to be paid (the money goes into an account that we can then use on classroom supplies, etc). For me, that equals 4 prep periods per 8 day cycle, so about 65 minutes every second day.
     
  17. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Our Union is pretty good about protecting planning periods; but I have heard that ELEM teachers often have their preps taken away for various reasons. I taught MS at two different K-8s and saw this often happen to the K-5 teachers. Now, it is up to the teachers to decide if they want to file a Union complaint over this or not and many do not.

    At my current school (where I teach HS), they will take our plan so that we can cover classes or attend IEP/504 meetings. We don't really do Department meetings at the HS level but our MS teachers often have to meet together during their plan.

    Our Union contract says that you are supposed to have one planning period per prep (or grade-level) you teach, but no one at my school has more than one planning period unless they are an IST or something similar. Everyone teaches 2 to 4 preps.
     
  18. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I ate lunch with my kids 5 days a week, did recess duty 5 days a week, did a 30 minute after school dismissal duty 5 days a week. My kids had art, PE, and music once a week for 30 minutes. Those 90 minutes were the only time I was not responsible for my class. Not even a bathroom break on the other two days. You had to beg a teacher to watch your kids for a minute during lunch to go. One year, I had music and PE on the same day, so I had three days without a break.
     
  19. cafekarma

    cafekarma Rookie

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    Giraffe, that sounds miserable. Thank you everyone for your replies. It is very interesting to see how the teachers who say they have prep time are also working in the states where positions are very difficult to find. I'm fortunate to have a job right now. I completely understand that fact and do not take it for granted. With that being said, my goal is to start working on becoming the type of candidate who would have a shot at a job in a state with more desirable working conditions. It just might take a few years.
     
  20. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    At least it's not just me. Add mandatory team meetings during these "preps" and that is not much time to get things done (or go to the bathroom) in the course of the school day. My kids wonder why I don't eat or drink much at lunch -- this is the reason. No union - private school.
     
  21. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    I work in private school and our kids go to PE plus a Special each day, each for 45 minutes. I love it!
     
  22. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Yup. At least 1 of the planning periods were taken by admin/meetings. Sometimes all three. I also had to be at school an hour before the final bell because the first 40 minutes were used as staff development. Normally, we had two meetings a week, plus extras like SIT if you were on the committees. Plus 30 minutes after school duty.


    Right now, I get 240 minutes of planning per week, a 40 minute duty free lunch, and I only have to be at school 10 minutes before the final bell, and I get to leave 10 minutes after the bell. On Fridays I leave at the bell. It is nice, but I miss my old school. It was a happier place. The teachers here are very grievance happy and it makes for a miserable environment.
     
  23. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    At our school we normally don't have prep periods, but it's ok, because our day is short, from 8:15 to 1:55, contract time is 7:45 (we supervise the kids from that time) until 2:30 but the kids do leave at 2 pm. We are with them all day, supervise during lunch and breaks, our duty free lunch is actually at 2-2:30, but if we want to leave it's ok.

    This is the first year when myself and the math teacher gets a prep period, and next quarter another teacher will have one as well, but this is only due to low enrollment. Starting in January I know this will all go away, because we'll get a lot of new kids.
    This prep is actually not 'mine', so I may be asked to perform other duties (take over other classes, confer with kids, tutor for CAHSEE etc) but I'm enjoying whatever time I can get.

    I don't mind because the days are short (this is short for high school), but if I had to do this from 8 to 3, I couldn't make it.
     
  24. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    We have planning scheduled 5 days per week, but our union contract only "protects" planning 3 days per week. According to our contract, teacher planning time must be "teacher directed" 3x per week. The other two days, admin can schedule meetings or training. Typically my admin only schedules something for planning one time per week, but can they take two days if they want.
     
  25. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I get 33 minutes of planning time every day. On days when I don't have recess duty then I have a bonus of 25 minutes while the kids are outside. We also have duty free lunch (60 minutes). I do pop back into the room for about 25 minutes (once the kids are outside on recess) to get some stuff done.

    Our planning time is written in our collective agreement - we have minimum number of minutes per school cycle.
     
  26. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I have an hour duty free lunch, a 40 minute prep while my kids are at special and 1/2 hour (before kids arrive ) meeting time every day.
     
  27. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    50 minute duty-free lunch
    30 minute before school planning
    20 minute after school planning
    20 minute mid-day recess (each teacher has yard duty 1x/week).
     
  28. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Our planning is supposed to be from 10-10:45, but we've been in school for 1 month and I've never gotten to take it. It's also supposed to be our lunch time. We have IEP meetings scheduled during planning on almost a daily basis, or I'll have to meet with a therapist or parent. The crazy thing to me is that my paras have a guaranteed 30 minutes lunch and the district freaks out if they find out you aren't giving them their full time. Yet teachers have no planning and I don't eat my lunch until after school is over.
     
  29. mai72

    mai72 Rookie

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    When I taught in South Korea for 2 years it was a struggle to do any planning. My hours were from 9:30-7:30pm. I worked 10 hour days. I had two 30 minute breaks during the day. TWO! I had to eat with the children. I had to send home a daily written report detailing what we did for the day. I had playground duty. I had to call the children once a week, so I could speak to them in English. I had to eat lunch with the children.

    On top of all this nonsense we had the parents come in once every 2-3 months so they could see how I taught my class. If they didn't like what I was doing the parents would pull their children out of school. They can't even speak English! It put a lot of pressure on me.

    It was an exhausting time. :eek:hmy:
     
  30. mai72

    mai72 Rookie

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    Do you ever stay after school until night time? It seems this is the only way to get things done.
     

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