No job since graduation, go for masters?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by shoreline02, Mar 14, 2011.

  1. shoreline02

    shoreline02 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    632
    Likes Received:
    116

    Mar 14, 2011

    I graduated in May and along with other new candidates, was unable to gain a full time teaching position. I was thinking about going back to school full time (if possible) to gain my master's degree. But I remember back when I was in school being told that school's prefer to hire people with just a b.s. since they have to pay them less. Do you think this is true? Also,do you think getting your masters if you haven't had a full time teaching position will hinder your career in anyway? Thanks in advance!
     
  2.  
  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 14, 2011

    I think that using this time to go back for your masters isn't a bad idea. Having a masters in a hard to teach area might make you more marketable.

    But it really depends what you want to get your masters in...
     
  4. shoreline02

    shoreline02 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    632
    Likes Received:
    116

    Mar 14, 2011

    I already have my K-6 elementary cert and was thinking about getting a masters as a Reading Specialist. I need to do more research on the market for reading specialists. The only other thing I thought of was to just get a masters in elementary education.
     
  5. Auter12

    Auter12 Comrade

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 14, 2011

    I am in the same boat, kind of. I did teach 2 years, but am back to subbing. I just started my masters courses 2 weeks ago, mainly because my certification will laps in January if I don't have 10 credits toward a masters. I do not plan to finish it, though, before getting a permanent position. A higher education will demand higher pay, and a first year teacher with little to no experience with a masters, I think, would be less likely to get a job than a first-year who could be paid less.
    I would say go ahead and start on a masters, but pace yourself! ;)
     
  6. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 14, 2011

    I think that going for a reading specialist certificate would be better than just a masters in elem ed. You are already certified to teach el ed, so why not add something to your certification to make you more marketable. Also, you will be able to apply to more jobs...
     
  7. shoreline02

    shoreline02 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    632
    Likes Received:
    116

    Mar 14, 2011

    Thanks
     
  8. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,902
    Likes Received:
    170

    Mar 14, 2011

    Ah, go for the Masters anyway! I was a sub while I worked on 2 credentials & my Masters & still got a job the same summer I graduated. Sure, I heard the same thing regarding why would districts want to hire someone w/ a grad degree & have to pay a higher salary to when they could hire someone w/ the minimum requirements & pay less, but that didn't stop me. My belief is that if something's meant for you, it wll happen despite whatever talk you may hear.

    Go for it!
     
  9. shoreline02

    shoreline02 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2010
    Messages:
    632
    Likes Received:
    116

    Mar 14, 2011

    Thank you for the encouragement!
     
  10. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

    Joined:
    May 13, 2004
    Messages:
    5,902
    Likes Received:
    170

    Mar 15, 2011

    Sure, good luck!
     
  11. ZACHERY

    ZACHERY New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2011
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 15, 2011

    I appreciate your idea to start Master , i think after having a master you might have lot of opportunities regarding your area of specialization.So i would suggest you to start master as soon as possible. Thanks
     
  12. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Mar 15, 2011

    I agree: starting a Master's won't make you any less marketable, and will get some of those preliminary credits out of the way. But I would be wary of going too far before having a job.

    Also, it's a great idea to check into the marketability of the course of study you choose. I would steer away from Elementary Ed-- you already have a degree in that, and the Master's won't make you any more diversified than you already are. Something in the realm of reading specialist makes sense-- with all the emphasis on reading test scores, it might make sense for districts to want someone who could potentially pull their scores up.
     
  13. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2006
    Messages:
    2,735
    Likes Received:
    5

    Mar 15, 2011

    I respectfully disagree. I think getting a Master's makes you a more difficult hire, due to what you've mentioned about getting paid more.

    However, starting your Master's in something marketable isn't a bad thing...
     
  14. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Mar 15, 2011

    I would not go for your masters if I were you. In my district you would not get hired, because you would cost too much. Even having just 6 credits would hurt you. Our lit specialist wants to get back into the classroom, but every time there is an opening, administration tells her no, because they want to hire a first-year teacher.

    I'm actually very surprised at how many people are suggesting you get your masters. I think it depends on where you are, but around here only new teachers get an interview, because they are the cheapest. That is how I got my job. It's not fair, but it's reality.
     
  15. LUCHopefulTeach

    LUCHopefulTeach Habitué

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    781
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 15, 2011

    I think its all relative to your specific situation but I've always been told by administrators that you shouldn't start your master until after you're hired, preferably after you're tenured, because you're more expensive which is an issue in this job market. They said this especially applies to those without any experience- they're going to hire the teacher who is cheaper if both are inexperienced.
     
  16. sunshine*inc

    sunshine*inc Cohort

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2008
    Messages:
    552
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 15, 2011

    I'm in the same boat and I don't want to do the standard MA degree here. I was thinking of Reading Specialist or even something in Speech and Language. I feel that these skills will help me in the classroom and I may be able to help colleagues as well.

    If there are pay freezes and a first time teacher is hired can they put you on step 1 column 1 even if you have a MA?
     
  17. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    6,156
    Likes Received:
    993

    Mar 15, 2011

    I agree with this. It's not right, but it's just how it is. They're going to pick the cheaper teacher every time especially if you just have a masters and no experience. And with an extremely high volume of applicants- there is going to be someone that looks just as good as you without a masters. I'd always heard growing up (most of my family members are teachers, family friends that are teachers/administrators, etc.) that you dont' want to get a masters until you've settled down into a district, are tenured, and know that it is the place you want to teach forever. And this was before the economy was really really bad!
     
  18. bondo

    bondo Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2010
    Messages:
    646
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 16, 2011

    I would agree to go for your masters. However, be sure to look at the potential costs of going back to school full-time, especially if you have some sizeable debt from your undergrad work.
     
  19. kab164

    kab164 Companion

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2010
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 19, 2011

    Where I live, you won't get hired with a master's. The teachers here wait until they have tenure to finish their master's. It all comes down to $. With the poor economy, budget cuts, etc. anything a district can do to save $ usually will happen. I am in my first year. I am 1/2 way to an LD endorsement, but found out it's more credits than a master's in elementary ed. So I will switch over, but not finish until I have tenure probably. I think it depends on where you live. Overall, I think budget issues are a huge concern in most schools right now. Good luck.
     
  20. kab164

    kab164 Companion

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2010
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 19, 2011

    I just remembered something. A local school hired a teacher who had her master's, but she had to be paid as a new beginning teacher with no master's or experience to get the job. That's unusual, because most of our local schools don't hire anyone with a master's.
     
  21. ash_sk8s

    ash_sk8s Companion

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2011
    Messages:
    171
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 19, 2011

    This is an interesting conversation. In my program, like the other programs in Oregon, I'm earning my initial teaching license (ece/elem) and my masters in education at the same time. There aren't undergrad programs that allow you to teach here. At least, not with the public universities. I'm already dreading my job search enough...now I'm more worried!
     
  22. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    2

    Mar 21, 2011

    I went to a college with a 5yr program where I earned my bachelor's and master's full time before ever looking for a job. Many people would tell me oh you won't get a job because people don't want to pay extra for the master's. Well in NY teachers need to obtain their master's in 3 years, so its not like schools have the option of hiring and keeping on teachers who don't have a master's. And from what I heard from people in the field and my professors that was a myth anyways. My master's is also in special ed, which is safe from the hiring freeze my district is experiencing which helps as well. I say go for it! I ended up finishing school a semester early on Feb 1st and started my new job Feb 28th teaching 4th grade. I say go for it- I'm sooo happy I won't have to go to class at night after working all day.
     
  23. pumpkincup

    pumpkincup Rookie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2009
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0

    Mar 21, 2011

    I think you should hold off on getting it for a few reasons. First, although you may have loved student teaching, there are many teachers who start teaching and quit after a few years. It would be awful to spend your money and then change your mind about it.

    Also, in my classes we had to do assignments with children and the people who didn't have their own class were definetly at a disadvantage. They were able to get through the assignments, but it was more difficult.

    Another thought is the money. I would worry about acquiring more debt through taking classes. If you can afford grad school and don't have any debt ignore this statement.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. miss-m
Total: 286 (members: 2, guests: 256, robots: 28)
test