No classroom to call my own...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by myangel52, Jul 10, 2014.

  1. myangel52

    myangel52 Comrade

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    Jul 10, 2014

    After about 8 years in one district, I have been hired in a new district, which I am super excited about. However, I am going to have the new adventure of not having my own classroom.

    I was hoping that the collective AtoZ group could give some very helpful pointers to help with this. I am told that they operate on a block schedule, and that for one day I might have a classroom, but for the other day I will likely be in at least two or more classrooms. Additionally, I will be teaching math and science. I don't know much more than this yet.

    Suggestions? Advice?
     
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  3. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Jul 10, 2014

    If there is room, set up a table in each of the rooms you share. It's definitely not too much to ask of the other teacher and it will help you to have supplies waiting for you instead of always having to lug yours around or depend upon this other teachers supplies.
     
  4. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 10, 2014

    Definitely ask for at least one desk drawer and a section of board to be set aside in each classroom. Also secure a rolling briefcase or cart for essentials.
     
  5. myangel52

    myangel52 Comrade

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    Jul 11, 2014

    Thanks! Those are good ideas.
     
  6. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Jul 11, 2014

    Coming from the other side, some things to consider ...

    During my plan this year, a math teacher came into my room everyday to teach an 11th/12th grade class. I also taught about 95% of the kids in this class so they knew me and my classroom very well. The math teacher and I got along, but it was a very messy situation because we didn't really set any "ground rules" first. Also, he didn't have great classroom management with this group which caused numerous problems (he has been teaching for over a decade).

    My school doesn't really have a teachers' lounge (or library) and I didn't want to spend 1.5 hours sitting in my car everyday during my plan. At first I would leave my room everyday so the math teacher would not have to worry about my presence, but by December, I started staying in my room during this time. As you can imagine, this caused many issues such as the kids wanting to talk to me while their teacher was teaching, kids asking me if they could leave the room instead of asking the teacher, etc.

    Still, the biggest problem was when a kid and the teacher got into it (which was often) and the kid expected me to be a witness and back them against the math teacher. Now, I ALWAYS had the teacher's back in these situations, but I often didn't agree with him or how he "handled" these arguments. The students knew that if I was being fair and honest, I would have their back in most of these sitautions.

    Eventually, I would always try to leave the room for the first 30 minutes to "run errands," wander the halls, talk to other teachers who had plan at this time. Just waste away time (when I should have been in my room planning).

    Since the kids in the math class were familiar with my room, they would use my supplies I left out (which I didn't mind) but they would never return them or damage/lose things. The math teacher had his own supplies but the kids preferred to use mine. The teacher also let them eat in my room and move the desks (which I didn't mind) but it was always me and the math teacher left to straighten up my room.

    I could go on and on and on and on ... Basically, set some ground rules first or the whole situation could run amuck.
     
  7. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

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    Jul 11, 2014

    Will all of your classes be on one floor? We have a teacher who has a "home base" with a desk for files, basic supplies etc... but uses a rolling cart with all of her "stuff" on it. She has bins for each class that she is teaching that day (or until her prep when she can go back to her area and switch out the cart). It seems to work well for her.
     
  8. myangel52

    myangel52 Comrade

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    Jul 11, 2014

    love2teach: Yes, because the school is one floor. I don't have a clue how close or how far apart they will be.

    Go Blue: wow... I would never have even thought about conflicts like that. That is good to think about; once I know more about the situation, I will look into that. Thank you for that perspective!!
     
  9. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Jul 12, 2014

    I've been on both sides of that coin. Find out if you'll have a space somewhere for you desk and files (mine was in the book room; other teachers have had a desk in another teacher's classroom).

    Find out if the school is providing a cart for you or if you need to purchase one (the school provided me with a cart).

    Multi-section file folders were my best friend. I had two with sections for each period - one was papers in, one was papers out.

    Bring your own dry erase markers, pens, pencils, and tissues. Some teachers don't mind sharing; some do.

    Ground rules are good. Where I had to float/was floated into, the "home base" teacher was required to leave the room while the floating teacher was there. Some teachers were graceful about it; others would flat-out refuse to leave and interrupt the class.

    You'll need to become a super-freak organizational wizard - if you forget something, you can't run back and get it!

    Technology-wise - do you know if you'll have a laptop? That would make your life much easier.
     
  10. Rhesus

    Rhesus Comrade

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    Jul 13, 2014

    I've taught high school for 14 years. For 13 of those years, I've taught out of a bag.

    1. Be very organized. I keep stuff for each class in color-coded folders to keep things straight.

    2. Redundancy. Get materials in triplicate (or however many rooms you'll be in) and preposition them in the rooms.

    3. Invest in a quality bag.
     
  11. IdahoSpEdTeach

    IdahoSpEdTeach Rookie

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    Jul 22, 2014

    When I "floated" I took a wheeled cart with me. I never used the host room's supplies and I preferred that the host teacher left the room.
     
  12. myangel52

    myangel52 Comrade

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    Jul 26, 2014

    I really appreciate the tips from everyone. I have started writing down questions that I have to ask, and will go from there. I will definitely be talking with the teachers of the rooms and setting clear boundaries! :) Thanks!
     

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