No classroom Pet

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by eydie, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. deserttrumpet

    deserttrumpet Comrade

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    Jul 17, 2007

    A lot of common house plants have been proven to improve the quality of the air we breath by taking out allergens and increasing O2 levels (like spider plants). If I were in your shoes I would find some research on this to present to your district. Perhaps if all your student's parents sign a waiver you can also have pets??
     
  2. AngelM

    AngelM Rookie

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    Jul 17, 2007

    That's really kind of sad :(

    I have to tell you that I have a daughter who is allergic to every kind of animal dander under the sun (including hamsters!!!). If she's in a room with a cat or dog, she has an asthma attack. However, that being said, even she has her fish!! Pets are such a neat part of childhood - it's sad to see that taken away.
     
  3. pamms

    pamms Comrade

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    Jul 17, 2007

    Hmmm, I've never been a fan of allowing furry pets in the classroom. I (and my dd) have allergies and even if we're in a classroom for a short time (like switching classes for something) they can trigger allergies that can affect the whole day. I don't think it's a good idea. But, I don't get the plant thing...or problems with fish. Have they said why?
     
  4. elizak83

    elizak83 Companion

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    Jul 17, 2007

    The last school I taught in did not allow pets of any kind. But I was told that it was because it was "a distraction from learning." I was very bummed out about it. I wanted to get a turtle. I think it would've been a good learning experience, not a distraction. We were allowed to have plants though...I don't get why they would say no plants.
     
  5. SouthernTeach

    SouthernTeach Companion

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    Jul 18, 2007

    :eek:
    We have found many snakes on our campus (even in the building!!)
    :eek: I found one (a small one) last year in our backpack/coat area.
    Whenever anyone on campus encounters one we call a certain teacher who is not afraid of snakes and he catches them and takes them to his room-he has an aquarium for them- or releases them at the back of the campus near a retention pond.
    I personally don't want any pets, but I sure would be upset about the no plant rule!
     
  6. hyperangel

    hyperangel Rookie

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    Jul 18, 2007

    My building allows plants and pets. I am not sure if it's a building or district decision but I know at least where I am currently we're allowed.
     
  7. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Jul 18, 2007

    Plants and fish are part of our curriculum.

    As far as being a distraction from learning.....
    They can be (depending on what kind) BUT they also offer a tremendous wealth of learning and I'm not talking just about feeding and caring for it. I know our students do journals on our pets. They are SOOOOOO motivated by this compared to when we ask them to write at other times. We also learn some facts about our animals and they ask very interesting questions. Without even trying tons of science gets dumped into the day's lessons. We even have prediction sheets for what kind of foods our animal will eat. The students learn that predictions don't always match reality and it's okay to be wrong. We indirectly discuss the scientific method and encourage them not to change their answers. They've even asked to test other theories. Wow! Animals can offer a variety of learning lessons that can't be matched with scripted curriculum. Last year the students learned a lot, first hand, about hibernation. We did a bulletin board on it. That was neat!

    We do send out a letter about our pets and we check with the office for allergies (just in case parents don't read and object).

    We have 2 classrooms and last year it was necessary a few times for me to move one of the pets into whatever room we weren't using because of a student who had some obsessive tendencies. He was the one, however, that benefited the most from using the pet as a motivational writing tool among other things. Sometimes it became a positive reinforcement tool for him as well.
     
  8. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Jul 18, 2007

    I have two baby female gerbils. :) They became mine yesterday. I never dreamed of having pets before this. The teacher who gave them to me had a million pets in her room last year- gerbils (she had... 8 or 10?) and a few snakes.

    However, the furry traveling buddy is a good idea, and so is having one of those fake fish tanks. The teacher next door has one of them, and she doesn't have to rest worrying about live animals. I am actually scared that I won't do the right thing for the gerbils... though they don't have to be fed or cleaned as often as I thought before.
     
  9. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Jul 19, 2007

    I had some gerbils for a couple years, but gave them to students at the end of this year. They just became too much work. This year they began fighting (drawing blood) and we had to seperate them. I didn't have room for two cages, but kept them that way all year anyway, taking space away from our art area. Some other classroom "borrowed" one for some time, which was good for the other classes as well. A kindergarten class ended up researching gerbils and studying their behavior, so that was good.

    The kids loved them though. I am teaching summer school, and today a student commented that she missed the gerbils.

    I have a beta, and the fish is going on year ! I think classroom pets ARE great, and are wonderful for responsiblity. I would like a turtle as well. I think studying the habitat would be good. You could do great research about turtles, as there are so many kinds, in all kinds of habitats!
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2007
  10. ~mrs.m~

    ~mrs.m~ Comrade

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    Jul 19, 2007

    Can you tell be what care a beta fish requires? Are they easy to maintain? I've had gerbils, guinea pigs and hamsters. I am done with those (enjoyed them at the time though).
     
  11. deserttrumpet

    deserttrumpet Comrade

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    Jul 19, 2007

    Most fish are easy to care for. Beta's are nice fish bowl sort of fish and are easy to care for. If you have old enough kids then it is easy to have a kid or two take responsibility for your critters. I had a student who would come in in the morning and feed my fish. This made work really easy for me!
     
  12. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jul 19, 2007

    Betas are SUPER easy to care for! They are great for single fish environments, because they will fight and/or bite other fish (I have had other fish's tails be destroyed by a beta!). They are one of the few freshwater fish that do not overeat, even when overfed. Plus, they are beautiful, with bright jewel colors and their long flowing tails!
     

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