No Child Left Behind Legislation

Discussion in 'No Child Left Behind' started by Guest, Jan 29, 2003.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Jan 29, 2003

    What about this law that says that a teacher is not "highly qualified" unless they have a Master's Degree in their field and that federal money will be taken from schools that have teachers on staff without a Master's Degree in their field? I am out raged at this. I have been considering a Master's degree in Library Science, but currently teach 5th grade. This is my 5th year to teach and yes, I do have 1/2 of a Master's in Elementary, but would really love Library Science. What will happen to my job if I don't complete my Master's in my field by 2006? I am so angry about all of this!!!
     
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  3. Amanda

    Amanda Administrator Staff Member

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    Jan 30, 2003

    Are you sure about your facts? Please feel free to add more if you feel I am missing something... Here is a quote regarding the "highly-qualified" teacher requirement from the No Child Left Behind site:

    "Under the law, each state education agency must have developed a plan to ensure that all teachers are highly qualified by the end of the 2005-06 school year. The plan must establish annual, measurable objectives for each local school district and school to ensure that they meet the "highly qualified" requirement. In general, a highly qualified teacher has a bachelor's degree, demonstrated competence in the subject matter and teaching skills, and full certification or a passing grade on state teaching exams and a license to teach."

    I have seen nothing mentioning a Master's degree... but I think most states require a Master's in x number of years already...

    The NCLB site emphasizes the need to keep quality teachers, so I don't think it's likely you're going to be forced out of your job due to a picky requirement. From what I can see, it is supporting legislation to get teachers trained and properly certified, and working toward eliminating a shortage of quality teachers (particularly in the areas of math and science).
     
  4. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Jan 30, 2003

    Hmm. she's not the only one that heard about the MASTER'S degree thing. Someone at school mentioned that last week. I'll have to print that piece up and take it to them. I have a few friends that were fretting about that.

    Lori
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Feb 1, 2003

    Ny requires that you get your masters....i hope to start this summer....although I have been hearing roumors that NY is changing all their requierments.....I find it funny...they are at a shortage for teachers yet they are making it harder and more un appealing to become one!
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Feb 2, 2003

    "No child left behind" sounds wonderful It is a great catch phrase but is totally without realistic substance. We all have students who were left behind before they started school. Even a highly qualified teacher cannot fix every child that comes to school broken. I have had years where I had students that I focused on feeding and cleaning and nurturing. Unfortunately none of that is on the tests that are used to hold me accountable. But as a caring member of the human race I have to be accountable to myself and my values before some paper test. A child cannot begin to learn when the sores on his arms are infected or her belly is growling so loud I can hear it in front of the room. I have difficutly focusing on my teaching when I can still see the tear stains on her cheeks. When parents can't be bothered by anything school related then it all falls on the teacher but the teacher has very little say in anything. The school boards, the administrators and the legislators make the rules and we are held accountable.

    Be true to yourself and hope this insanity passes before we lose the best of our teachers to technicalities that have very little merit in the day to day classroom full of little, needy children.
     
  7. Hunbun

    Hunbun Rookie

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    Feb 2, 2003

    No Teacher Left Behind

    We're halfway through the fourth year of a four year contract and there are already strike talk rumors looming on the horizon. This is based on past school board track records of negotiating, and current financial concerns.

    We plan on calling the strike effort "No Teacher Left Behind" to emphasize that if they want to attract qualified people and keep the ones they have, then perhaps it's time to give us some positive attention. Chances are slim, but I guess it's worth a try.
     
  8. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Feb 3, 2003

    pay

    if all teachers are to have higher degrees, where will the monies come from to pay for them?
    My county pays three thousand dollars more for masters. More for specialist and doctorate. They even have tuition reimbursements for those who go to further education. Its not much monies but its some. If masters degrees are required then all newbie teachers will be attending university programs that combine both into one program.

    Degrees versus someone with experience. I think education has just entered the corporate world attitude.
    ruth
     
  9. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Feb 3, 2003

    instead of "no child left behind," they oughta call it "no child left stagnent..." I have a couple kids that just arent' cognitively ready for grade-level work... does this mean we should force them to do grade-level stuff to "keep up" just so they won't be "left behind?" that seems to be a lost cause... yes, doing stuff to help them progress, but not necessarily getting them up to what everyone lese is doing...
     
  10. AngelaS

    AngelaS Cohort

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    Feb 4, 2003

    LOL! Love that! No child left stagnant. :D
     
  11. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Feb 5, 2003


    No child left behind! My school got picked to test the students. Not all of the students will be tested. They were randomly picked from 6 fourth grade classes. Some classes have more than others that will be tested. I look at it as another day that my students will not be learning anything again. We all laughed when we heard who would be tested. Some of the slowest child in the grade level. I'm not talking "smarts," but it takes them forever to get anything finished. This is a timed test and in my state they are tested at the end of the 3rd and 5th grades, but they can take all day. We also have a writing test that is untimed. I will have a few kids who will take all day to write it.

    I have too many students in my class. 30 students and 22 of them are boys. Last year I had 24 students. They will not make the classes smaller because it's 24.5 per teacher for the whole school. (The younger grades are smaller.) In my class I have 10 students with some kind of learning problem and only two have been fully tested and get help. I do not have any help and I ask for it all of the time. I was observed a month ago and I was told that I had good crowd control. I feel left behind.

    Virginia
     
  12. AngelaS

    AngelaS Cohort

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    Feb 6, 2003

    ((((((((((((Virginia))))))))))

    You are so sweet. I love the way you put that. You ought to publish that in an editorial.
     
  13. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Feb 8, 2003

    I love that the government is finally concerned with our kids. But, I mean really what are we going to do? We will just have to grin and bear it. But, I definitely will still be here for the kids. That is why I entered education not for the money (HA I work two jobs just to eat!) but for the kids. In a few years we will all look back on this No Child left Behind and just laugh...one big education fad after another.
     
  14. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    Feb 9, 2003

  15. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Feb 21, 2003

    No Child Left Behind

    I'm not sure about other states but I am in the process of getting a degree in Mobile, Alabama for Elementary Education. As far as the No Child Left Behind goes, what has been told to us by professors is that we will be required to take more classes in the general subjects, not in the teaching area, so we are better qualified in the classroom. They have also informed us that all of the current teachers will have to come back to school to meet the requirements unless they have a masters in their specified area. They are not saying that a Masters is required. They are only saying, right now, that if a teacher has a masters in their field then they are not going to have to take the extra courses. As far as the people in my program, we are worried because they have not told us exactly what the classes will consist of, but are confident that we will have jobs in the workplace because it is thought that most teachers that are able to retire will decide to do so. I hope this helps anyone wondering about the subject.
     
  16. AngelaS

    AngelaS Cohort

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    Feb 21, 2003

    That is such a shame... they know teachers are going to retire in droves and still make these requirements. I also think it's a shame that politicians want people to focus on content area knowledge. Sorry, but if you study the textbook and curric, you can figure it out! But if you don't know how to manage behavior, or effectively convey to students all that vast knowledge floating around in your head, kids won't learn! I will never understand why some people think that methods classes are a waste of time. I would rather have a graduate of a teaching schooll teach my child than an engineer with no classroom prep or pedagogical knowledge! :mad:
     
  17. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Feb 22, 2003

    According to the No Child Left Behind website:
    http://www.nclb.gov/next/closing/slide038.html

    "What is a 'highly qualified teacher'?

    Elementary school teacher:
    --Holds a bachelors degree
    --Has demonstrated mastery by passing a rigorous test in reading, writing, math and other areas of the curriculum

    Middle or High School Teacher:
    --Holds a bachelors degree
    --Has demonstrated competency in subject area taught by passing a rigorous State test, or through completion of an academic major, graduate degree, or comparable coursework"
     
  18. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Feb 22, 2003

    For a longer definition of "highly qualified teacher," you may download this government document:

    http://www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/SIP/TitleIIguidance2002.doc

    Here is the definition of "highly qualified teacher" from that document:

    "HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHER:
    1. When the term “highly qualified teacher” is used with respect to any public elementary school or secondary school teacher teaching in a State, it means that:

    a. The teacher has obtained full State certification as a teacher (including certification obtained through alternative routes to certification) or passed the State teacher licensing examination, and holds a license to teach in such State, except that when the term is used with respect to any teacher teaching in a public charter school, the term means that the teacher meets the certification or licensing requirements set forth in the State's public charter school law (see entry below for the definition of a highly qualified charter school teacher); and

    i) The teacher has not had certification or licensure requirements waived on an emergency, temporary, or provisional basis.

    2. When the term “highly qualified teacher” is used with respect to:

    a. An elementary school teacher who is new to the profession, it means that the teacher has met the requirements of paragraph (A) above, and:

    i) Holds at least a bachelor's degree; and

    ii) Has demonstrated, by passing a rigorous State test, subject knowledge and teaching skills in reading, writing, mathematics, and other areas of the basic elementary school curriculum (which may consist of passing a State-required certification or licensing test or tests in reading, writing, mathematics, and other areas of basic elementary school curriculum); or

    b. A middle school or secondary teacher who is new to the profession, it means that the teacher has met the requirements of paragraph (A) above, holds at least a bachelor's degree, and has demonstrated a high level of competency in each of the academic subjects in which the teacher teaches by:

    i) Passing a rigorous State academic subject test in each of the academic subjects in which the teacher teaches (which may consist of a passing level of performance on a State-required certification or licensing test or tests in each of the academic subjects in which the teacher teaches); or

    ii) Successful completion, in each of the academic subjects in which the teacher teaches, of an academic major, a graduate degree, coursework equivalent to an undergraduate academic major, or advanced certification or credentialing.

    3. When the term “highly qualified teacher” is used with respect to an elementary, middle, or secondary school teacher who is not new to the profession, it means that the teacher has met the requirements of paragraph (A) above, holds at least a bachelor's degree, and:

    a. Has met the applicable standard in the clauses of subparagraph (B), which includes an option for a test; or

    b. Demonstrates competency in all the academic subjects in which the teacher teaches based on a high objective uniform State standard of evaluation that-

    i) Is set by the State for both grade appropriate academic subject matter knowledge and teaching skills;

    ii) Is aligned with challenging State academic content and student academic achievement standards and developed in consultation with core content specialists, teachers, principals, and school administrators;

    iii) Provides objective, coherent information about the teacher's attainment of core content knowledge in the academic subjects in which a teacher teaches;

    iv) Is applied uniformly to all teachers in the same academic subject and the same grade level throughout the State;

    v) Takes into consideration, but not be based primarily on, the time the teacher has been teaching in the academic subject;

    vi) Is made available to the public upon request; and

    vii) May involve multiple, objective measures of teacher competency [Title IX, Part A, Section 9101(23)]."
     

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