NJASK/standardized test prep

Discussion in 'General Education' started by HufflePuff, Mar 16, 2010.

  1. HufflePuff

    HufflePuff Cohort

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    Mar 16, 2010

    Any good websites out there?

    Also, any tips on strategies for answering multiple choice questions, especially with reading selections?
     
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  3. peachacid

    peachacid Companion

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    Mar 16, 2010

    I always remind students to eliminate the answers that they KNOW can't be right. Then we go through the questions together and talk about HOW they know the ones they crossed out can't be right.

    By focusing on this strategy for multiple-choice questions that follow passages, it shows the students that the answers are all right in the text, and they become used to checking back in the passage for their answers.

    I have more but I have to go!

    By the way, as a reading specialist, in my building, I have been doing test prep almost exclusively since the end of February. We've missed 9 days so far because of snow...I mean NOT SO FAR. We missed 9 days TOTAL because of snow, so EVERYONE in the building that can is working on test prep. Ugh. Anyway.
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Mar 16, 2010

    When is the test?
     
  5. MissJill

    MissJill Cohort

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    Mar 16, 2010

    Do you use studyisland.com?
    It's what most schools in NJ use. It's based on the test, it let's you monitor the scores and everything. I'm pretty sure the school has to purchase it though.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    google queue workbooks- they will sent you free samples of LA and Math test prep books for NJ Ask. They ask that you not photocopy-they provide the samples in the hopes that schools will order class sets for practice. Worth a look.
     
  7. HufflePuff

    HufflePuff Cohort

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    Mar 30, 2010

    any more tips on answering multiple choice?
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Mar 30, 2010

    In the test-making trade, the wrong answers to a multiple choice question are called "distracters". You could point that out to your kids: there are reasons that the wrong answers are wrong, but the wrongness may not be obvious at first glance.

    If you're on your spring break, you might want to go glance through my favorite SAT-prep book: Up Your Score. There are some fine strategies there that can be adapted to your students - and the advice about attitude is both priceless and spot on.
     
  9. 3Sons

    3Sons Enthusiast

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    Mar 30, 2010

    How much do you know about the scoring? Is there a guessing penalty?

    The SAT is based on penalizing "pure" guesses -- so statisically, it works out in your favor if you can correctly eliminate even ONE bad answer. But beware: distracters are quite powerful. On some SAT questions, the percentage of people answering correctly falls below 20% -- worse than chance for a question with 5 answer choices.

    There are essentially two types of reading selection questions: detailed and overall. A lot of the distractor answers to overall questions will pick at details.

    To get an overall feel for the selection, you typically don't need to read the whole thing and it's better not to. On the SAT, the general advice is to read the first and last sentence of each paragraph, and then do all the general questions. Since you haven't read a lot of the details, many of the distractor detail answers will simply appear bizarre.

    Then go to the detail questions, scan the selection for the information pertaining to that question, and read just a couple of lines ahead and after the specific piece of information to be sure you have the context. Since it's a detail-oriented question, you don't need to be reading the entire selection.

    Remember, with all tests but particularly large standardized tests like the SAT (and hopefully the ASK), the answers are vetted pretty carefully. Mistakes are occasionally found, but quite rarely. This means for each answer, ETS must be able to give concise reasons why each of the wrong answers is wrong and the right answer is right. The justification might seem picayune (which is why the perception of a lot of kids might be that two answers really say the same thing), but it's there.
     

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