Nitpickiness

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by HollaPino, Oct 27, 2011.

  1. HollaPino

    HollaPino Rookie

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    Oct 27, 2011

    ...if that is a word. Just venting some frustration caused by my administrator. I know that it is their job to correct you and such, but when does it become too much? Too much that it sends mixed messages?
    To provide a little background, my administrator preaches how the teachers must put students first. It continues with cries of making accommodations for different learners and celebrate every student. Messages of positive attitude constantly.
    However, once the speech is done the actions are much different. One example had this administrator walking in to my classroom to deliver, what I thought, was good news about a contest a student participated in. The administrator did just that, but in the manner only this person can. This person congratulated the student personally, but only after having a "sidebar" conversation with me while I was working with a different student. It was about the student I was working with (obviously within earshot) concerning how the student didn't know the school pledge. To paraphrase what this administrator said, "She needs to memorize the school pledge. I've been very disappointed as to how these students have not read fluently during the Morning Meetings." I understand that students should show pride with their school, but how do you build that up when you talk down to your staff and a student?
    I have other examples, but it is becoming harder to stay loyal to someone who is so nitpicky.
     
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  3. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Oct 28, 2011

    I agree, it would prob be hard to work for a nagging principal. I really appreciate that my P does not micromanage.

    On another note, I don't quite see a problem with what your administrator said/did (except if that child could hear what he/she said).
     
  4. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Oct 28, 2011

    I don't see the problem with what he said except for the earshot thing as Lynnnn mentioned. Telling a paid adult that they need to make sure a student learns something that is required and that they as the supervisor is disappointed by what is being seen in the area of reading fluency is completely valid. I don't see that as nitpicky at all.
     
  5. HollaPino

    HollaPino Rookie

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    Oct 29, 2011

    I realized my example wasn't the best...but I just was at the tipping point with this administrator.

    If you want a clearer example, let's go back to the student that won the writing contest. This student won and he congratulated her but when it was time to celebrate it with other teachers during the staff development, he mentioned how he didn't like how the student used "fancy" font. Also, I can recall many e-mails where this administrator would say, "excellent bulletin boards, but please be sure to remove any stray staples." Or how about when it was end-of-the-year time and said administrator sends out an e-mail reminding the staff to refer to our checkout checklist because too many of us were removing our bulletin boards a day or two early.

    I just have low tolerance for micromanagement...
     
  6. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Oct 29, 2011

    I wouldn't like that either.
     
  7. miamibeet

    miamibeet Rookie

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    Oct 29, 2011

    I agree with Hollapino! That is very nickpicky and borderline bullying. Is this princpal this way with the entire staff most of the time. Or, is this just with you?
     
  8. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Oct 29, 2011

    guess the p has nothing else to do. sheesh
     
  9. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Oct 29, 2011

    How would you like the P to address the issues he/she feels need to be fixed?

    Is your complaint that you want the "positive attitude constantly" that the P expects to be applied to student to be applied to the person getting paid to do a job? I truly am confused as to how this is mixed messages. I don't expect the same treatment as the students.

    Maybe I have a thicker skin, but I wouldn't be offeded by the issues you are bringing up as examples. Yes, they are tiny things that P wants changed, but that is the perogative of the P. I bet there are reasons (and valid ones) for the issues. Two off the top of my head - some fonts make the writting difficult to read, particularly the fancy one. Stray staples that are in the board correctly look sloppy and might be picked at by people; stray staples that are sticking out can scratch if touched.

    I guess the way I look at it, we have reasons our students have rules that may seem nitpicky to the student, but we expect them to follow them. Well, P has the same thing.
     
  10. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Oct 29, 2011

    I would get to work early, take out a picture of your administrator for the yearbook, look at it and say a prayer forgiving that person for good. You can spend your time making a difference with your students or being upset at your administrator for the mistakes he makes--you won't have time for both. If he makes larger mistakes, address them to him.

    I don't think he was talking down to you. He is just overly concerned about the pledge and handled it slightly in the wrong way at the wrong time. Forgive him and put all your energy into helping your students. Otherwise you will not have the energy to have the fun, passion, and impact that you want to have as a teacher. Or you can ignore this post and ruin much of your school year mad at administrators as I did long ago. I wouldn't wish that on any teacher.
     
  11. comaba

    comaba Cohort

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    Oct 29, 2011

    I don't see that as nitpicky either. I see it as totally inappropriate. There's nothing wrong with the principal's concerns, but interrupting instruction to discuss it? Wrong, wrong wrong!

    Send an email, have a conversation after school, but don't interrupt instruction with a student who apparently needs the extra help to discuss said student. :dizzy:
     
  12. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Oct 29, 2011

    I think what the OP is getting at is that the P is being hypocritical. On the one hand, the P is expecting the staff to be 100% positive with the students all the time, always put them first, etc. but then the P is not showing the teachers that same kind of attitude that is expected of them. The examples themselves wouldn't bother me that much, but I can see how it might be frustrating given the way that the P expects the teahers to act but refuses to act that way himself/herself. Thankfully, I don't really experience that at my school but I remember thinking the exact same thing in my college classes. Many of my professors were so hyprocitical in this same way. I could go on and on, but for just one small example, they acted like paper/pencil test were the work of the devil. Anyone in our class who wanted to use one at the end of a unit or suggested it in any of work was blasted for not knowing how to assess students. However, in many of these exact same classes, our final exams were paper/pencil tests! Now, I don't have a problem with someone giving a paper/pencil test, but I DO have a problem with someone telling me it's innapproriate to do in my classroom and then turning around and doing it in thier classroom.
     

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