Nine planets

Discussion in 'Third Grade' started by lov2teach4, Feb 10, 2010.

  1. lov2teach4

    lov2teach4 Rookie

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    Feb 10, 2010

    Anyone have any suggestions on fun ways I could introduce and teach the nine planets? Since I'm a new teacher this year I got some sheets from one of my co-teachers. I feel that the unit is very dry and I want to add more hands-on, fun activities to teach it to them. HELP!:help:
     
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  3. HMM

    HMM Cohort

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    Feb 10, 2010

    You should first start by changing your title...there are 8 planets

    ;)
     
  4. corney

    corney Companion

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    Break them in to 8 groups and have them each make one of the planets.. there are plenty of facts pertaining to each planet that they will all have something to add.. once they are all finished line them up and have each one read off the facts about each planet..
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I had my 3rd graders one year write letters home from their planets. I let them know to include info about the conditions on their planets. They were really fun.
     
  6. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Yes please :)

    Check out NASA.gov. They have a huge selection of lesson plans for all age groups. Some of them are really good.
     
  7. Ross

    Ross Comrade

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    Feb 10, 2010

    Please show them a large assortments of the spectacular pictures taken by spacecraft of the eight planets and the many, many moons.

    Stores such as Barnes & Noble and Borders have discounted books with stunning pictures.
     
  8. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    There's a great website where you can actually "see" different planets at different parts of the day. The link is on my school computer; I'll post it when we finally get back to school. Also, I know last year's 3rd grade teacher did a great group project with the kids, but I can't really remember the details now. I'll check on that, too.
     
  9. lov2teach4

    lov2teach4 Rookie

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    Feb 11, 2010

    My bad! Sorry, EIGHT planets:haha:
     
  10. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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  11. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Feb 11, 2010

    I have information on a webquest/group project for a "mission" to each of the different planets. PM me your e-mail address if you would like a copy of it.
     
  12. penguinpc

    penguinpc Comrade

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    Feb 11, 2010

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Alisha

    Alisha Cohort

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    Aww...Poor guy! lol! I love it.
     
  14. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Feb 11, 2010

    every time I teach the planets the debate over Pluto comes up. I just teach it as a dwarf planet. I revised the My Very Eager Mother Just Served Us Nine Pizzas to My Very Eager Mother Just Served Us NACHOS.

    To help remember order
     
  15. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    awe too cute. Poor, poor Pluto
     
  16. lov2teach4

    lov2teach4 Rookie

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    I would love to know the website and the project, thank you so much :angel:
     
  17. lov2teach4

    lov2teach4 Rookie

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    Thankx, awsome website!
     
  18. lov2teach4

    lov2teach4 Rookie

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    I would love the info. but I'm new to this website and I don't know how to PM you! Can you tell me how?
     
  19. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Feb 11, 2010

    My Very Eager Mother Just Served Us Nine DELICIOUS Pizzas, if you want to teach Pluto as a dwarf planet. But, then there are other dwarf planets that by defaut you should teach also (former asteroid Ceres, Makemake, Eris, Haumea).

    I find it fun to have a debate with the kids over whether Pluto should be classified as a planet. According to the definition of a planet, Pluto shouldn't be, but according to tradition, it is. And really, why does it really matter? It's fun to let the kids hammer it out.

    Planets-I don't know the grade level, but you should probably start with how they formed. I like to use 3 different colored play doughs, and have the kids break off small bits of each into a pie pan. Then you have them press lightly and swirl around the pan. Eventually, the 3 colors will start to hook up and form round bodies. It's a neat way to demonstrate how random particles swirling around formed together. You can either have the 3 colors represent some materials, or depending on age, not.

    Then, you should talk distance. I have always used the walking solar system, but I saw a neat foldable at SEEC last week. Let's see if I can write it...use a regular sheet of paper (or with littler kids you could use a big piece of contruction paper. Fold it hot dog style. One one side, have the kids write 'sun' at the top, and 'Pluto' at the bottom (yes, I teach Pluto. It won't matter for this distance exercise). Then have them estimate where each planet should be in relation to the sun. They will likely either evenly space them, or put the terrestrial planets closer together, and space out the jovian planets.

    Then, have them turn it over and write 'sun' and 'pluto' again. Now, fold it in half. Uranus should go on the crack (get it? :D ok, you don't have to say that, but my kids would get it right away!). Then fold Pluto up to Uranus. Neptune goes on that fold. Fold the Sun down to Uranus. Saturn goes on that fold. Next, fold the Sun down to Saturn. Jupiter goes there. After that, you can continue folding down, but it becomes messy, so I just have them space Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars between the Sun and Jupiter.

    You can either stop there, or have them open up the paper and you should have 4 sections on each side. Each section can list facts about each planet or whatever information you want (here's where Pluto gets left out-I just squeeze it in below Neptune).

    If you do IAN, using a piece of paper works well, because now you can just glue the guess side down in the notebooks.

    Hope all that makes sense! I am a space nut, so ask away any questions.
     
  20. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Feb 11, 2010

    I am actually teaching an astronomy unit to my 1st graders (very basic). There are some things on trackstar that you can look up. There are also a couple of interactive sites if you google astronomy for kids.
     
  21. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Feb 11, 2010



    :lol:
     
  22. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Feb 12, 2010

    At the conclusion of our solar system unit we made a paper mache solar system (it was a mess, but a great activity). This isn't the lesson I used to follow, but it's very close:
    http://lasp.colorado.edu/education/op_compendium/files/grades3-5/A Classroom Solar System.pdf

    You could also divide the class into groups and give each group a planet to research. They could use a simple program, like Photostory, to create a slide show to share with the class.

    Several years ago (before our state comp. curriculum came along and they took the planets away from me :( ) we used to do planet songs and plays. After doing their research they would create a song or play to share the information. They were a lot of fun.
     

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