Newbie Life Skills Teacher...HELP!

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by EllieMarie0801, Oct 8, 2016.

  1. Oct 8, 2016

    Hi!

    I just started teaching life skills in an elementary school this year. Some of my students have autism, some are nonverbal, and others are in my room due to behavior...a very diverse mix!
    Right now my biggest concern is Math. I wanted to know if anyone has recommendations for math instruction...I'm not sure what to teach and what order to teach it. So far I've been pulling whatever is free on the internet! I have no
    Math curriculum (I do have Unique Learning System but it is way too difficult for my kids so I haven't been using it...regret even purchasing..). I have some students working on addition with single digits and others who are working on number identification and 1:1 correspondence. Not too sure where to start or how to differentiate such a big gap...SUGGESTIONS!???
     
  2.  
  3. Emy SUkenaga

    Emy SUkenaga New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 22, 2016

    Hi!

    I'm a TA at a high school right now. But last year I was a TA in a self contained classroom in an elementary school. Most were autistic, some non verbal, and some had pretty big behaviors (sounds similar to your classroom!)

    What our special ed teacher did was had independent work for them in folders- practicing addition, subtraction, number identification, counting, etc. for each student to work on on their own. She also set aside a time to work on their math goals throughout the day. So some of the kids were working on single digit addition- we wrote out addition problems for them in a spiral notebook. Most of the worksheets we found online were not great because they were so small! Usually, when students were able to do single digit addition, she would move on to carrying, then double to single digit, then carrying, etc. I know they used the technique with touch points (each number has dots on it to help the students add). This would be a time when she would collect data, and determine whether they were proficient in a subject.

    I don't know of any curriculum (I was just a TA :) recommendations, though, sorry about that!

    Hopefully that was somewhat helpful!
     
    It'smycalling likes this.
  4. It'smycalling

    It'smycalling New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2016
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 23, 2016

    I work in various settings within SPED. I looked at each of the goals from their IEP's. I then developed an excel spread sheet indicating various goals. I was able to group some kids together based on their goals but also (more importantly) their current abilities. If you can, try to assess their current abilities to use as a benchmark. I went to my district SPED department who were able to provide a lot of resources both online and other sources. Some books used for other grade levels can be used if you modify the instruction. In the meantime, the internet offers a lot of stuff that can be a bit overwhelming so talk to teachers in your building to see what sources they have already. You GOT this.....
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. hirad20
Total: 408 (members: 1, guests: 380, robots: 27)
test