New Test in CA for Early Completion Option

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by jazzminjoy, Jun 22, 2007.

  1. Cal

    Cal Rookie

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    Jul 26, 2007

    You have to have a job offer to get a credential? That doesn't strike anyone as incredibly, well, stupid?
     
  2. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 26, 2007

    You don't have to have a job offer to get a regular credential from a regular credential program, no. But to get a credential via internship, you have to have an internship/job offer, I think.
     
  3. Cal

    Cal Rookie

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    Jul 26, 2007

    So anyone wanting to get an alternate certification has to have a job offer, first. The people wanting alternate certification are probably least likely to have job offers. If it's only allowed to people who have job offers, it sounds more like a fast-track for existing teachers.
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 26, 2007

    In fact, I don't believe internships are designed for existing teachers at all: there are different mechanisms in place for someone who already has a credential of some sort (and there's generally not much they have to do about teacher coursework, unless they're adding a multiple subject authorization to an existing single subject authorization, or vice versa.

    An internship is a district job, which means the district's got to have the money to put someone on the payroll - but I believe an intern typically isn't paid as well as the holder of a full-on credential, and/or the intern is more or less bound to teach in that district for a certain number of years.

    I was about to say that I don't think that California has alternate certification in the sense that other states do, but I suspect it's more accurate to say that California lacks NON-alternative certification - by which I mean that the CCTC doesn't recognize or authorize an education major, in contrast to many other states, so that BOTH the regular California credential and the internship are programs in which all of the training in teaching takes place after the BA is obtained.
     
  5. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

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    Jul 27, 2007

    In CA, an intern is the teacher of record and, as such, receives a full teacher's salary and benefits. It is starting teacher's wages, but it is still full pay.

    A district must first seek a credentialed teacher. That is part of the "fully qualified" clause of No Child Left Behind. After due diligence (advertising and posting the job announcement), if no teacher is available, then the district may hire an intern.

    The intern is only required to teach for the academic year for which he was hired. I believe that to remain in the credential program, an intern must continue to work when regular school is in session (that is, he is excused from having to teach summer school). Once the credential program and the contract school year are over, the intern is not bound to a school district.

    You may be thinking of the APLE loan forgiveness program, which requires work in any qualifying district (rural, inner city, and very low performing schools, I think) for several years. Transfers from one district to another qualified district are allowed.

    I'm not sure about the existence of special programs for existing teachers. I know they could do an internship with an early completion option. This would require passage of the CSET, TFE, and the other normal requirements, such as a US Constitution course and RICA for self-contained classroom teachers. Part of the advertising for CalStateTeach is "for existing teachers." It is the same program as for intern teachers.

    You are correct that in CA, obtaining a teaching credential happens after graduating with a BA/BS. It is akin to a fifth year program. However, students who take many eduction courses during their undergraduate years will have a fast track to obtaining a credential. It would not be as long as a non-education major. These are called blended programs.

    To enter an intern credential program, you have to have a job offer. To have a job offer, you must be able to begin an intern credential program. It is a chicken and the egg thing, and I haven't figured out the timing. I think the strategy is to obtain a job offer close to when a credential program is starting up.

    The intern programs are now requiring pre-service training before teaching, and that is usually offered only in the summer (for the low cost programs. Private schools such as Chapman begin classes every six weeks.) Some programs, such as Project Impact for San Joaquin county, allow you to enroll in the pre-service program without a job offer. Others, such as Project Pipeline in Contra Costa, Solano, and Alameda counties, require a job offer before enrollment. You can submit an application in March and they will help you find a job via the job fairs before the pre-service begins in the summer for the school year beginning that late-summer. However, if you don't get a job, you do not get enrolled and cannot take the pre-service.

    In my school district, school begins July 30. Students (with job offers) in the pre-service Project Pipeline training aren't finished, so they are hired as long-term subs and then switched over to internship teaching once the pre-service is complete.

    My understanding is that a teaching internship credential is a one-per-person per life deal. You may not switch programs (Special Ed to Single Subject Math, for instance, or Project Impact to Project Pipeline) or drop out and restart.
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Jul 27, 2007

    Thanks for the corrections, jazzminjoy.
     
  7. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

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    Jul 27, 2007

    You're welcome!
     
  8. Cal

    Cal Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2007

    Earlier, I said:

    "If it's only allowed to people who have job offers, it sounds more like a fast-track for existing teachers."

    I meant teachers from out of state, although it certainly wasn't clear!

    "To enter an intern credential program, you have to have a job offer. To have a job offer, you must be able to begin an intern credential program."

    Wow. That's pretty disgusting.

    The entire teacher production mill is nothing more than an income transfer between prospective teachers and the Cal State system. The education is useless, the people who actually have the desire to go through the program are the ones who have few other options and actually have to work hard to pass the CBEST, much less the CSET.

    All prospective credential candidates have to volunteer for 30 hours in a public school *before* entering a credential program. So the fact that I've taught for four years doesn't matter--no, I have to go waste time at a public school. Unbelievable.

    Fundamentally, they have tons of incompetents for whom teaching is a massive step up in life, and they have to ensure that these incompetents jump through billions of hoops to lose most of the worst ones. And they can't use anything as simple as knowledge and ability to qualify teachers, because the performance disparities would be politically unacceptable.

    I know, I'm saying nothing new. But the whole process is shameful.
     
  9. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    Aug 18, 2007

    I hope I'm not threadjacking here...but is that really true? My own credential program (CalStateTEACH) said nothing of the sort to me at any stage during the application process. They know I'm at a private school and that this position is my first teaching job. Is this going to cause trouble down the road, if I was supposed to do volunteering before starting my program? Granted, I haven't started yet, but I will be starting on the 27th--before public elementary schools start. And I'm working full time anyway. I never heard about that requirement before!
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Aug 18, 2007

    I don't know whether ALL programs require the volunteer stint, but certainly many programs do - the idea behind it is almost certainly to be sure that credential candidates have some idea what it is that they're getting into, before they go through with the credential program and all that comes with it, so they won't be (as) shocked later. I think some private programs may require more than 30 hours.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2007
  11. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

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    Aug 18, 2007

    Ohhhh, so it's not CA requiring it, it's the specific credential program. Ok, that's so much better. I'm sure I'll hear of any extra requirements directly from my program, then, if any exist. Haven't even been to orientation yet. I was afraid that I'd do my whole program, apply for my credential, and be denied because I hadn't volunteered!
     
  12. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Aug 18, 2007

    The programs that I've seen requiring it generally require documentation as part of the application to get into the program.
     
  13. srh

    srh Devotee

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    Aug 18, 2007

    When I was applying to my credential program (2004), there was a place in the paperwork asking for my "experience." At that time, it was ALL volunteer, and 90% was church-related: children's church, directing Vacation Bible School, Sunday School, extra kids events and activities, etc. They simply wanted to know I had some idea of where I was going. I can understand though, why some programs would require more specific school experience--I was in the program with some people that I really wondered about!! (By that I mean, they had no patience for kids, resisted hard work, shortcutted assignments like crazy, etc. Perhaps the 30 hours is to express a "good faith effort" to reach a difficult goal!)
     
  14. Cal

    Cal Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2007

    If they'd accept my four years experience teaching students of all incomes and abilities as a proxy, I wouldn't object. I am so certain that they won't accept it that I haven't even gotten around to asking, because I'll be annoyed when they say no. There's absolutely no mention of substitute experience accepted.

    And I'm sorry, but a teaching credential is not a "difficult goal" in the normal sense of the word. The hoops are onerous. The instruction and the level of intelligence required is not.
     
  15. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Aug 18, 2007

    If I were you, Cal, I'd ask, really and truly. And I'd prepare by finding out what sort of documentation of hours and what sort of additional written exercise is expected, and I'd volunteer to provide the parts that correspond with the spirit of the Field Experience exercise.

    What have you got to lose?
     

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