New Test in CA for Early Completion Option

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by jazzminjoy, Jun 22, 2007.

  1. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 22, 2007

    Senate Bill 57 recently passed in CA. This bill requires all teaching credential programs which offer an internship option, also offer an option for early completion of that internship. This option is valid for Multiple Subjects or Single Subject Math, Science, English or (coming soon) Social Studies candidates.

    As of August, 2007, a test will be available to show competency and thus opt out of credential program courses, resulting in early completion of the program.

    The name of the test is called the Teaching Foundations Exam or TFE. There is one for each area mentioned above.

    The website for more information is
    http://www.ets.org/portal/site/ets/menuitem.c988ba0e5dd572bada20bc47c3921509/?vgnextoid=3b8baf5e44df4010VgnVCM10000022f95190RCRD&vgnextchannel=d378197a484f4010VgnVCM10000022f95190RCRD

    The exam tests areas such as human development, classroom management techniques, working with English learners, and assessing student progress.

    for the math version, questions on teaching methods in math at the middle school level and at the high school level are included.

    The test is 4 hours long and consists of 50 multiple choice questions and two constructed response questions. There are sample questions with answers on the website.

    This is exciting news for those of us just beginning a credential program. It's great to have options!
     
  2.  
  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jun 23, 2007

    TFE has been an option for a couple of years now, though if I recall the problem with the Social Studies TFE is that there haven't been enough takers to make it worth while to administer.
     
  4. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 23, 2007

    My understanding is that the new legislation makes it a mandatory option. That is, any college, university, or other program which offerns an internship credentialing program in the areas of math, science, English, or multiple subject, must also offer an early completion option for those programs.

    I think the Social Studies test has not yet been written because the website states that the first time it is given, there will be a longer delay than usual in getting results because the test will have to be "normed" or something like that. You're right, also--there's not enough Social Studies test takers, which is probably why the exam makers have not yet gone through the expense of creating a SS test.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jun 24, 2007

    In fact the TFEs all exist, and have done for some years. "Norming" is about figuring out just what kind of performance constitutes a passing score for California's purposes.
     
  6. Cal

    Cal Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 24, 2007

    Could someone clarify this? If I pass single subject CSETs and also pass this, I don't need to take a credential program at all? Or I have to sign up with one only to get out of it early?
     
  7. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 24, 2007

    You still have to take the credential program (and you need the CSETs for that). However, the program won't take as long to complete if you waive some of the course work by taking the TFE. For example, if it normally takes 18 months to go through a particular program, you may be able to finish in 12 months if you take the TFE. That's a made up example, but it gives you the concept.
     
  8. Cal

    Cal Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 24, 2007

    What classes can't be waived?
     
  9. innovationguy

    innovationguy Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Messages:
    521
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jun 26, 2007

    This whole thing seems rather inchoate to me - truly, it might have statutory validity - authorized by CCTC and all that sort of thing! - but do "formal" credential programs recognize / countenance / encourage it? I very much wonder...

    Also, there's content that I would happily teach myself - Education Psychology, Adolescence, for instance - but there's a whole lot of relatively nebulous garbage that the credentialing curriculum is padded with [pardon me if I prefer circumspection over valour, but chaps know what I'm talking about!] that I'd be loath to study independently - without "classroom" exposure, I wouldn't know the first thing I might be assessed on!

    Jay.
    http://innovationguy.easyjournal.com
     
  10. JCarchy

    JCarchy Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2007
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 26, 2007

    Hang on, let's cut to the chase here.

    With the hundreds of us semi-teachers and career-changers using this website, and the thousands of postings about CSETs, testing strategy, teaching internships, etc., surely someone reading this has actually taken a TFE? Hopefully, the science TFE?? If so, PLEASE TELL US ABOUT IT.

    I recently discovered documents on the CCTC website for "District Intern Credential" as well as information about the "Provisional Internship Permit." I also read references to, and downloaded information about the "Science Subtest IV." Some of this information sounds like the TFE option, and may be related to it. But in general, the documents in question are quite turgid and somewhat confusing.

    I can understand that the hiring district needs to sponsor the applicant's request for a teaching internship, or the provisional internship permit, but what is the 4th subtest and how does it figure in? Is it the TFE??

    Have people who've taken the TFE actually benefited from it? Does the district advocate for and honor the TFE results, or must the TFE be utilized in concert with a classroom-based credential program? I suspect that I need and really want to sit through only about half of the classes that Chapman wants to charge me for-- so how do I use the TFE to pare down my required courseload?

    jc
     
  11. innovationguy

    innovationguy Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2004
    Messages:
    521
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jun 26, 2007

    Few [translation: none, till now!] postings have related to the TFEs. I received my credential [SS Math] just a few years ago, and was, till the 22nd of June, 2007 C.E., utterly oblivious of this "option"! [I don't profess to be some omniscient creature...oh, actually, I do! Sorry, what!]

    I would imagine that the credential departments of colleges and universities to be a) unaware of the "fine-print" and / or b) not to have "buy- in": after all, briefer the program, less revenue garnered! Unsurprisingly, school districts are even less likely to be on top of these things [they have little to do with credentialing as such!].

    Since I had time o.m.h. and was willing and a. to test my hypothesis, I rang up 2 Cal State Education Credential Advisors, and both pleaded innocence on the matter.

    Perhaps, information is not trickling down from CCTC? Or, possibly, the notion of the TFEs is still rudimentary?

    So there.

    Jay.
    http://innovationguy.easyjournal.com
     
  12. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 27, 2007

    Hmmm, this is getting interesting. Apparently, the law was passed in 2003, according to this link describing the legislation:
    http://www.ctc.ca.gov/educator-prep/intern/EarlyCompInternGuidelines.pdf

    At a Project Pipeline (alternate teaching credential program) meeting, I was told this was something new--just enacted.

    I wonder if the law was passed in 2003, but ignored (as Jay says, less revenue for schools and more work to put a program together). Perhaps now the CA Commission on Teacher Credentialing is cracking down. It's saying, look, if you offer an internship program, by law, you have to offer this early completion option, and we will check up, and if you don't, we are going to do something terrible to you. It seems only just very recently that schools are scrambling to give this option. The three programs I checked, Chapman, CalState Teach, and Project Pipeline, recently (I think) added the early completion option.
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jun 27, 2007

    I'd guess, actually, that something in more recent legislation lit a fire under someone.
     
  14. CareerChanger

    CareerChanger Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2005
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 18, 2007

    Hi All,

    I have actually taken and passed the mysterious math TFE. What it means, for me, is that through National University, I only need to take three courses and complete my internship teaching to get a credential using the early completion option. Not very many people are aware of the program or taken the test. When I took the test, there were 5 others in the room taking it, and some were several hours drive out of the area. Alliant University has a good program for folks interested in the early completion option, while I think that I may be breaking some new ground with National on the program. I was interested in teaching in a district that National served and Alliant did not,so I went with National. Passing the test can save you quite a bit of time and money. I did a lot of independent research and studying for the exam. It did not cover subject matter, so much as lesson plan writing, classroom management, teaching methods, etc.
     
  15. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 18, 2007

    Hi CareerChanger,

    Wow, that's great information. Just 3 courses and an internship and you get your credential--is that 3 courses in total, or 3 more in addition to ones you already took?

    There's proposed legislation (in CA) to have just one Teaching Foundations Exam (TFE) instead of a math flavor, science one, and so on. The reasoning is 1) there are not enough people to make the Social Studies one an option at this stage, 2) content knowledge is already accounted for either by the CSET or by completing content courses, and 3) one test is easier to track and administer than several. Makes sense to me.
     
  16. CareerChanger

    CareerChanger Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2005
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 18, 2007

    Hi There,

    that is just three courses total. I have not taken any education courses. It would be great if there was just one TFE. The multiple choice section had nothing to do with the subject matter (math), the lesson plans I wrote were generic enough that they could have been used for any subject as well, although one was for middle school and one for high school. I scored 194, the passing requirement was 153, and the possible score range was 100-200.
     
  17. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 18, 2007

    Thanks for sharing the information. Congratulations!
     
  18. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jul 18, 2007

    I suspect it would make most sense to do as is done with the science: one or more subtests testing common material and one subtest delving into the specifics for a particular subject area.

    I'll admit to being nervous about allowing people to test out of so many of the requirements... lots of people shouldn't. But it's possible that activities in BTSA fill some of the resulting gaps.
     
  19. srh

    srh Devotee

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    1,199
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 18, 2007

    Wow. I'm with you, TeacherGroupie--that seems like a whole other can of worms opening up if it "catches on." But as a two-weeks-ago-did-my-exit-interview-with-BTSA-person, I can vouch for their watchful eye. If anyone has a program as thorough as my area BTSA program was, they may WISH they had gone the long route in preparation!! I am a career changer too (just finished second year of teaching, turning 51 next month), and even with my LOTS of life experience, I have to say, I would have completely missed the boat in so many ways without having gone through my credential program. But then, the credential program I completed is an extremely reputable and demanding program--I know I got the best I could have gotten anywhere around here.

    Maybe I'm just one of "those" who need the extra assurance of all the goods I can get!
     
  20. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jul 18, 2007

    Part of it is that I desperately want for teachers to be so well prepared, so on top of the subject matter and the pedagogy and all else, that the critics and carpers and naysayers who sneer at K-12 education, and the well-meaning researchers who nevertheless condescend to the practitioners of K-12 education, will understand that it is high time for them to shut up and get out of the way.

    But that can't possibly happen unless teachers themselves, individually and collectively, hold themselves that accountable.
     
  21. srh

    srh Devotee

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    1,199
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 18, 2007

    YES!!! It's kinda like we shoot ourselves in the foot at times, isn't it? (Of course, the "we" can be loosely interpreted!) I had never thought of all this in those terms, but many in our profession probably don't even realize the added, unspoken responsibilities of "doing the job well." It's NOT enough to know the book work in this case! And it's not sour grapes for me--I would have chosen to do exactly what I did, because I know it was good for me to experience it all...
     
  22. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jul 19, 2007

    It's not enough to know the book work, and it's not enough not to know the book work...
     
  23. Cal

    Cal Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 20, 2007

    I'm coming from the entirely opposite direction. I think education programs are a joke. The average GRE score is terrifyingly low, and the classes are simply a waste of time.

    As far as I'm concerned, the best thing to do is waive any nonsense of additional education (beyond a college degree), set a high competency level (which the CSETs do), do a criminal check, and then fire the ones that can't teach. Instead, we set a ridiculously onerous education requirement, only recently set a reasonable competency level, and never fire the ones that can't teach.
     
  24. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2007

    Maybe the concerns TG and srh brought up are part of the reason the early completion programs have been somewhat "secret" for so long. (The other reason, as Jay mentioned, is money. Schools which let the students leave early loose money.)

    On the other hand, some locations have a dire need for teachers, especially math and science ones. Without the early completion option, the schools would hire long term subs who have not even passed the CSETs, as that is not a requirement for subbing. So, to fill the need...

    Perhaps the early completion option initially came about to help people who were already teaching but didn't have an official credential; perhaps the program has morphed into something else.
     
  25. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2007

    Srh,
    Which credential program did you attend?
     
  26. srh

    srh Devotee

    Joined:
    May 4, 2005
    Messages:
    1,199
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2007

    Jazz-- Fresno Pacific Univ...are you familiar? It is such a great school with an incredible reputaton for its teacher program. I am SO glad I chose to go through that one, even though I'll be paying for it for many years! :-D How about you? Are you in the same area?
     
  27. rikov

    rikov New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 24, 2007

    I am going to be taking the TFE: English on August 4, 2007 in Berkeley. I am going to be starting the Early Completion Option (ECO) at Alliant University in Sacramento, and I feel that perhaps I can provide some insight into how it works, as well as dispell the myth that the TFE and ECO will somehow water down California's teaching pool.

    First, a bit of my background: I have a bachelor's degree in Anthropoplogy, but later I moved to Mexico City and eventually started working as a teacher in a bilingual high school while concurrently completing a Master's in Education (oddly enough, also from Alliant University, which happens to have a campus in Mexico City). I will be moving to California in about a week.

    Because of the move, I needed to figure out how to get a job. Mind you, I have three years of teaching experience as well as a recently completed Master's degree from a University which is accredited by WASC. However, I don't have a teaching credential. I really didn't want to do another two-year program (it would be rather repetitive), and I didn't want to work at a private school, so the best option for me turned out to be the Early Completion Option, as it only takes two semesters to finish. But you can't just enter the program and finish. In order to enter the program, you also need a provisional credential from CCTC. And it is not easy to get. Here are the requirements for earning the credential required to get in to the ECO program:
    -- Passing the CBEST
    -- Passing the CSET (either multiple subject or single subject)
    -- Fulfilling the U.S. Constitution requirement (either through university coursework or passing an exam offered by an accredited community college)
    -- DOJ certificate of clearance
    -- Bachelor's degree
    -- Job offer from a school or district. THIS IS THE BIG REQUIREMENT!!! Not just anybody can get an offer from a school. You have to show significant experience or potential. It's kind of a Catch-22 situation, because in order to get the intern credential, you first need a formal offer of employment, but not many schools are willing to give a formal offer of employment to someone who does not have any official credential yet. For this reason, perhaps, the ECO program may work best for working in Charter schools, which may have more flexibility in hiring. Fortunately, I have managed to get a job offer from a public school, and I will now be approved for the provisional credential and, thus, the ECO program as well.

    Once in the ECO program at Alliant, you must:
    -- Attend a weekly seminar
    -- Successfully complete the four California Teacher Performance Assessments (TPAs)
    -- Fulfill the RICA requirement (I'm not yet sure if previous coursework can fulfill this requirement)
    -- Pass a Technology class
    -- Pass the Teaching Foundations Exam (TFE)

    I'm sorry if this message was exhaustive (exhausting?), but perhaps that is reflective of the strict, thorough requirements for the Early Completion Option. To reiterate, the hardest part is getting offered a job before you have your credential; passing the TFE alone will not get you the job, although if you complete that step before entering the program, it might demonstrate to potential employers that you have the pedagogical background required by the program. If you have any more questions, let me know. Like I said, I haven't even begun the program yet, so I couldn't call myself an expert, but I have already passed the CBEST and CSET, so I can testify to some of the rigor demanded by the program.
     
  28. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jul 25, 2007

    As to RICA, if you're going for a single subject credential I think you don't need it, but if you do need it, I don't believe there is a classwork/transcript alternative. Hold off, though, until you've had elementary school-level reading instruction methodology coursework - these days, most such courses explicitly prepare for RICA.
     
  29. urbancoastoffrd

    urbancoastoffrd Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2006
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2007

    Rikov--are you doing single subject or multiple subject?
    I likewise am doing it 8/4 and am contingent with Alliant.
    I have to admit some of this stuff is a bit overwhelming.
    How are you doing though?
    I'd be really interested in talking to someone who is also taking it this date. Feels like I am the only one!
    Too bad I'm in Southern California or we could have a study session!
     
  30. rikov

    rikov New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2007

    I'm doing the single subject TFE. As TeacherGroupie mentioned, it's probably best that there aren't study guides, but I've been using the guide on the ETS site to start looking up information on issues such as education for special needs students, English language learners, and pedagogical distinctions between high school and junior high English courses. A lot of this stuff I know either instinctively or through my own practices, but often I don't know the specific terminology used in California and the U.S. in general (for example, I had to look up acronyms like IEP and CELDT). However, I have the feeling that the main point is to be able to clearly identify objectives and have a good understanding of the type of lesson planning needed to achieve those objectives, taking into account the needs of different types of learners. It was suggested to me that I look at the TPAs to get a deepers sense of what the constructed response section of the TFE coud be like. I've looked at one, and even seen some sample responses, which has helped as well. But yes, in the end you kind of feel like you are on your own. Have you started the Alliant program yet or are you about to begin? In my case, I've been admitted and I begin in August.

    As to the RICA, TG, you are right about there not being an examination to bypass the coursework (my mistake). I get so confused with all these requirements, I forgot that what I really wanted to check is to see if my Master's course on reading and writing instruction could fulfill the RICA requirement.
     
  31. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jul 25, 2007

    Actually, rikov, what I meant is that coursework doesn't bypass the exam requirement: if what you're going for is a California multiple subject credential, reading instruction coursework is required AND so also is RICA.
     
  32. Cal

    Cal Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 26, 2007

    You have to have a job offer to get a credential? That doesn't strike anyone as incredibly, well, stupid?
     
  33. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jul 26, 2007

    You don't have to have a job offer to get a regular credential from a regular credential program, no. But to get a credential via internship, you have to have an internship/job offer, I think.
     
  34. Cal

    Cal Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 26, 2007

    So anyone wanting to get an alternate certification has to have a job offer, first. The people wanting alternate certification are probably least likely to have job offers. If it's only allowed to people who have job offers, it sounds more like a fast-track for existing teachers.
     
  35. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jul 26, 2007

    In fact, I don't believe internships are designed for existing teachers at all: there are different mechanisms in place for someone who already has a credential of some sort (and there's generally not much they have to do about teacher coursework, unless they're adding a multiple subject authorization to an existing single subject authorization, or vice versa.

    An internship is a district job, which means the district's got to have the money to put someone on the payroll - but I believe an intern typically isn't paid as well as the holder of a full-on credential, and/or the intern is more or less bound to teach in that district for a certain number of years.

    I was about to say that I don't think that California has alternate certification in the sense that other states do, but I suspect it's more accurate to say that California lacks NON-alternative certification - by which I mean that the CCTC doesn't recognize or authorize an education major, in contrast to many other states, so that BOTH the regular California credential and the internship are programs in which all of the training in teaching takes place after the BA is obtained.
     
  36. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 27, 2007

    In CA, an intern is the teacher of record and, as such, receives a full teacher's salary and benefits. It is starting teacher's wages, but it is still full pay.

    A district must first seek a credentialed teacher. That is part of the "fully qualified" clause of No Child Left Behind. After due diligence (advertising and posting the job announcement), if no teacher is available, then the district may hire an intern.

    The intern is only required to teach for the academic year for which he was hired. I believe that to remain in the credential program, an intern must continue to work when regular school is in session (that is, he is excused from having to teach summer school). Once the credential program and the contract school year are over, the intern is not bound to a school district.

    You may be thinking of the APLE loan forgiveness program, which requires work in any qualifying district (rural, inner city, and very low performing schools, I think) for several years. Transfers from one district to another qualified district are allowed.

    I'm not sure about the existence of special programs for existing teachers. I know they could do an internship with an early completion option. This would require passage of the CSET, TFE, and the other normal requirements, such as a US Constitution course and RICA for self-contained classroom teachers. Part of the advertising for CalStateTeach is "for existing teachers." It is the same program as for intern teachers.

    You are correct that in CA, obtaining a teaching credential happens after graduating with a BA/BS. It is akin to a fifth year program. However, students who take many eduction courses during their undergraduate years will have a fast track to obtaining a credential. It would not be as long as a non-education major. These are called blended programs.

    To enter an intern credential program, you have to have a job offer. To have a job offer, you must be able to begin an intern credential program. It is a chicken and the egg thing, and I haven't figured out the timing. I think the strategy is to obtain a job offer close to when a credential program is starting up.

    The intern programs are now requiring pre-service training before teaching, and that is usually offered only in the summer (for the low cost programs. Private schools such as Chapman begin classes every six weeks.) Some programs, such as Project Impact for San Joaquin county, allow you to enroll in the pre-service program without a job offer. Others, such as Project Pipeline in Contra Costa, Solano, and Alameda counties, require a job offer before enrollment. You can submit an application in March and they will help you find a job via the job fairs before the pre-service begins in the summer for the school year beginning that late-summer. However, if you don't get a job, you do not get enrolled and cannot take the pre-service.

    In my school district, school begins July 30. Students (with job offers) in the pre-service Project Pipeline training aren't finished, so they are hired as long-term subs and then switched over to internship teaching once the pre-service is complete.

    My understanding is that a teaching internship credential is a one-per-person per life deal. You may not switch programs (Special Ed to Single Subject Math, for instance, or Project Impact to Project Pipeline) or drop out and restart.
     
  37. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Jul 27, 2007

    Thanks for the corrections, jazzminjoy.
     
  38. jazzminjoy

    jazzminjoy Comrade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2006
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 27, 2007

    You're welcome!
     
  39. Cal

    Cal Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2007
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 18, 2007

    Earlier, I said:

    "If it's only allowed to people who have job offers, it sounds more like a fast-track for existing teachers."

    I meant teachers from out of state, although it certainly wasn't clear!

    "To enter an intern credential program, you have to have a job offer. To have a job offer, you must be able to begin an intern credential program."

    Wow. That's pretty disgusting.

    The entire teacher production mill is nothing more than an income transfer between prospective teachers and the Cal State system. The education is useless, the people who actually have the desire to go through the program are the ones who have few other options and actually have to work hard to pass the CBEST, much less the CSET.

    All prospective credential candidates have to volunteer for 30 hours in a public school *before* entering a credential program. So the fact that I've taught for four years doesn't matter--no, I have to go waste time at a public school. Unbelievable.

    Fundamentally, they have tons of incompetents for whom teaching is a massive step up in life, and they have to ensure that these incompetents jump through billions of hoops to lose most of the worst ones. And they can't use anything as simple as knowledge and ability to qualify teachers, because the performance disparities would be politically unacceptable.

    I know, I'm saying nothing new. But the whole process is shameful.
     
  40. 3littlemonkeys

    3littlemonkeys Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2007
    Messages:
    300
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 18, 2007

    I hope I'm not threadjacking here...but is that really true? My own credential program (CalStateTEACH) said nothing of the sort to me at any stage during the application process. They know I'm at a private school and that this position is my first teaching job. Is this going to cause trouble down the road, if I was supposed to do volunteering before starting my program? Granted, I haven't started yet, but I will be starting on the 27th--before public elementary schools start. And I'm working full time anyway. I never heard about that requirement before!
     
  41. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,807
    Likes Received:
    1,171

    Aug 18, 2007

    I don't know whether ALL programs require the volunteer stint, but certainly many programs do - the idea behind it is almost certainly to be sure that credential candidates have some idea what it is that they're getting into, before they go through with the credential program and all that comes with it, so they won't be (as) shocked later. I think some private programs may require more than 30 hours.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2007

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. REW,
  2. Naturegirl59
Total: 210 (members: 3, guests: 172, robots: 35)
test