New teacher struggling with student engagement among ninth graders

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by neal, Nov 22, 2016.

  1. neal

    neal Rookie

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    Nov 22, 2016

    Hello,

    I am a new teacher in New York and I am struggling with classroom management and student engagement. I have certain students saying to my face that my class is the worst/ their least favorite of the day. and During lessons I can see their boredom. The problem is that I do a lot of individual work because behavior is so bad. I try to tell them we can do more fun things if there wasn't so much talking but it really doesn't work. Any thoughts?

    P.S. we are reading Romeo and Juliet
     
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  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Nov 22, 2016

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
  4. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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    Nov 22, 2016

  5. Secondary Teach

    Secondary Teach Companion

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    Nov 22, 2016

    Games are your friend! My 8th-10th grade Literature students love playing literature styled trivia in the form of Family Feud or guessing vocab terms by playing Hangman etc. For Family Feud, I usually just divide the classroom into teams of three and the winning team goes against me and my team. For Hangman, the class champ gets to head to head against me- Mr. J. The kids love that. :)
     
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  6. Secondary Teach

    Secondary Teach Companion

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    Nov 22, 2016

    I love Sarah Brown Wessling, she's taught me so much through her Teaching Channel Presents TV programs. Oh, OP pod-casting is great too for English literature instruction and learning.
     
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  7. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Nov 23, 2016

    I can understand taking away a fun activity if students are misbehaving, but students need to have some experience with fun activities first in order for taking them away to be effective. I take the stance of fun activities being the norm and they come in to the classroom expecting to engage in a fun activity. If students are misbehaving they lose the privilege to engage in our fun learning activities on an individual basis (not whole class, as that just turns the entire class against you). That way those who were following the rules get to have fun while those who have to sit out get to see their friends having all of the fun while they have to sit independently and work on individual silent work. This makes the consequence much more effective than denying them all fun activities from the get-go, and making promises that they can have fun activities if they behave (which generally will never be fulfilled because one or two people will always try to ruin it).

    You will need a clear classroom management plan and to enact consequences fairly across the board.
     
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  8. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Nov 23, 2016

    Look into gamifying. I watched a teacher transform her 9th grade class in one month. It takes pre-planning and then sticking to the plan, but it worked like magic.
     
  9. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Nov 23, 2016

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019

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