New teacher, reached my limit.

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by newtothis2006, Feb 10, 2007.

  1. newtothis2006

    newtothis2006 Rookie

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    Feb 10, 2007

    I am a new teacher. (3 weeks now) I teach 2nd and 3rd grade Sp Ed Resource. I have reached my limit to dealing with behaviors. My 3rd graders are a group of 5 that are very low and needy. I have struggled with all of their behaviours but most have gotten better. One childs behavior in particular has escalated and all my time is devoted to dealing with his outbursts. I can't handle it! It's not fair to the other children. Here's the deal. This kid is Autistic. His behavior is as follows: he comes in with a negative attitude saying "I'm bad", he refuses to do the journal work saying he "doesn't know" but when it's time to do the journal problems he is the first one raising his hand blurting out "me, me!" He won't have anything written down in his journal, just maybe the one problem he wants to answer. When he is given an assignment he will either just sit there and refuse to do it or he will constantly raise his hand every 30 seconds for me to walk over to him. Mostly asking irrelevant questions. So, in a nutshell the problems are he is blurting out over me while I am teaching, or other students, he is refusing to do his work by excessive whining and complaining, he is bursting into tears when threatened to write in his behavior log or call mom. (This week, he has cried almost everyday.) His behavior is affecting my other students, they see he is getting away with it and at times they try it too. This has got to stop! I believe I have given this kid to many warnings and he has been manipulating me for attention. No more. I am exhausted constantly redirecting him and the other kids have to endure it. Real quick b/c this is getting long. I have a sticker chart for them to earn stickers when they are following directions. When it is filled up, they can pick a treasure from the box. It doesn't seem like this is working with this kid, he wants stickers and asks for them when I give them to other students, but it doesn't change his attention seeking behavior. I thought about doing a "star/student of week" for the student with the least corrective behavior marks. Any ideas on how to get a handle on him?
     
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  3. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Feb 10, 2007

    I can help if you'd like!

    hello newtothis,

    I can really understand your frustration right now. You've probably been thrown into a classroom without any support, ideas, or even an idea of what your students are like. I have found that Texas likes to put students who are usually somwhat ED in the resource rooms as well. If the student with a "negative attitude" comes in, you might miscommunicate it as being an emotional disturbance. I see it as this student is frustrated, confused, overwhelmed. Most people with ASD (Autistic Spectrum Disorders) have limited social interaction skills which means that we have difficulty with social (verbal mostly) interaction with others. We are mostly visual learners (biggest strength) and we tend to like things to remain the same free from change. We freak out when unexpected changes occur, including the most simple changes you wouldn't expect us to freak out over. Students with ASD need a visual schedule to help them structure their day. It could be posted, a mini-schedule, or a check-off list. This is a must for students with ASD. Next, you should have a visual cue of the routines that you want him to follow. Ex: a visual cue on how to work the journal time, when you are teaching concepts, how to work with the paraeducator. These will help remind him, give him a routine and trust me it'll become like second nature once he's got these routines down. Another thing is, students with ASD have sensory issues. We can actually "hear" the lights flickering, the siren from a fire engine 5 miles away, even simple little sounds. He needs to be placed in a work area which is free of visual, tactile, auditory, olfactory (smell), stimulation as much as possible. The preferred desk setting is a carrel (a desk or table with a enclosure around it to mask out all other sensory stimuli). If you would like some specific ideas on how to structure his day individually, please do not hesitate to contact me through private message or my email on my private messaging. I will need a schedule of your entire daily routine that the student is in the classroo, this includes anytime he leaves to use the restroom, visits his home-room (general education), and other areas that interact with your room. Also, I will need a list of routines that you employ in the classroom that the student is expected to follow: sharpening pencils, cleaning area, desk organization, homework expectations, daily rules, journal rules, individual work time rules, group work rules, ect. Please try to be as specific and concrete to the best of your ability.

    You may have read that I have mentioned "we" quite a bit talking about students with ASD. I would like for you to know that I also have AS (Asperger's Syndrome) which is a very mild form of autism. I was diagnosed with AS in my late twenties. I struggled, worked hard, and did my best through my school life. I was also in Adapted Physical Education and Resource Language Arts, Mathematics most of my school life. I am now a fully credentialed teacher in California working with students with autism. I also have my teaching degree from Texas A & M University in Texas. I have a lifetime teaching certificate in both elementary and generic special education from Texas as well. I hope you are able to contact me soon. I am free to help you with ideas right now. I will be returning from to work from the 3-day weekend holiday on 2-13-07 (Tues).

    Troy in Downey, CA (Los Angeles area)
    AspieTeacher
     
  4. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    Feb 10, 2007

    Troy gave you great advice! Also, don't give threats. That isn't doing anything. If he does something you don't like tell him and give a consquence. You need to have a set of guide lines. So he knows what to expect.
     
  5. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Feb 10, 2007

    Newtothis,

    JaimeMarie is right. Do not give threats to people with ASD, we will expect you to go through or we will argue and it will cause confusion. Be consistent, clear, and most of all (DO NOT ARGUE) just give the consequence. I have much more severe students in my current classroom. I have one student who came to me from another school. He is used to sleeping all day and i'm doing everything I can to keep him occupied with a sensory activity or work related task. He screams at the top of his lungs when I don't give him the attention and I'm just stuck with ignoring him. I don't have the "luxury" of putting him outside because he is VERY LOUD. I would suggest this website for ideas about good and bad consequences. http://www.redandgreenchoices.com
    This is a great site of how to visually cue a student about making the correct choice and what consequence will follow NO MATTER which CHOICE the student makes. Do not talk to him, argue with him, if he starts to argue about the choice he made. I still think it would help if you contact me through email if you have any other concerns.

    Troy
     
  6. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Feb 10, 2007

    Aspie Teacher, you just gave away my biggest frustration with schools. Don't "dump" a kid in a general classroom and not give a teacher (and aides) a clear understanding of what that student has and practical classroom tips (such as you gave) to help implement a good strategy and be a good resource for the student involved.

    It's not fair to the teacher and most importantly it is REALLY not fair to the student when a teacher takes almost the whole year to finally understand what's going on only to have it reinvented the following year. Wow. No wonder students come in disturbed and frustrated. If the adults in their life can't figure things out, how are they supposed to?

    Newbie, this rant is by no means a slight against you but rather a empathy note for the position you are put in. It's wonderful that you care enough to ask. That's the most important first step. Not everybody cares even that much.

    I think general education teachers would be much more readily acceptable to the IDEA act if schools were much more with it to provide them even with some basic information beyond..."Oh yeah, this student has Autism." Clues on the IEPs are not enough.

    Also as an Aide, I resent being really unprepared for students I come in contact with. It's not even the teacher's fault. I need to know that I'm not disciplining the wrong thing or that I can't do something to make the enviroment better for that child.
     

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