New Teacher Looking For a Job

Discussion in 'General Education' started by EGrace, Jun 11, 2016.

  1. LilMitsuko

    LilMitsuko Rookie

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    Jun 13, 2016

    I am in the same boat as you, though I haven't even had the chance to interview yet. As for things to mention to principals to stand out, I agree with the suggestion that you ask for feedback so you can improve your interview skills. But tie that into how you are always willing to learn more about your subject/technology/teaching methods. Show them that you are a dedicated to learning and improving your abilities for the sake of your students! You could also ask questions regarding recent studies or news articles revolving around education/your subject material. Ask what they think about x study and how it might be beneficial to utilize at the school, etc. Hope that helps! Good luck to you!
     
  2. EGrace

    EGrace Rookie

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    Jun 13, 2016

    That is a good suggestion. I know ion best interviews, principals have asked how I stand out and what educational books I am reading. I end up answering that due to taking masters classes this summer, the majority of my educational reading is journal articles for the construction of my thesis.

    I also bring my past observation forms, which show my improvements and make sure to convey that I treasure feedback and work to immediately incorporate and change to reflect feedback into my teaching and instruction. One of the questions I always ask is what qualities do you respect most in a teacher? Principals almost always respond with coachable, committed, dedicated, intelligence...etc. All of which I hope I conveyed during the interview.

    Only one interview so far this week for an interim position. Depressing : (. Hoping that things have just slowed down, since principals are on their short summer break.
     
  3. ha336

    ha336 Rookie

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    Jun 14, 2016

    No, I did not ask any other questions, that one seemed to do the trick. I completely understand how you feel. You may want to check with some before/after school programs. When I moved to a new state, I had trouble finding a teaching position due to licensing requirements, and I landed a job as a Site Coordinator for a non-profit's after school program. This allowed me to be in the schools, make those connections, and still get in some teaching experience.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 14, 2016

    How short are your interviews?
     
  5. Srhhwtt

    Srhhwtt Rookie

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    Jun 15, 2016

    That's great advice! I realized how much employers like to talk about themselves or the school. I was advised to try to make the interview more like a conversation. Remember, you are also looking to see if they'd be a good fit for you, so find ways to ask about them. When asked a question I would answer what I would do, then ask, "is this something you do here" or along those lines. (but honestly, it took me 9 interviews to get an offer. I feel like I learned a lot from each interview though!)
     
  6. EGrace

    EGrace Rookie

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    Jun 16, 2016

    Lately they've been around 25-30 min.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jun 17, 2016

    That should be enough time to convey who you are as an educator.
     
  8. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Jun 17, 2016

    The first part of your post is exactly what I am in the middle of now. I've gotten a few more interviews during and after the substitute teaching progress. I would say that St. Louis, MO is a tight market, but that is an excuse to me. If I was good enough at what I did, it doesn't matter how tight the market is. I am teaching summer school at the school I student taught now, but there's no chance here (my CT became an AP while I was student teaching and the district went outside to fill his spot instead of me earning it b/c the guy had 19 years).

    The process sucks, but the only thing you can do is try to be your best every day. Good luck, and may your journey not include substitute teaching.
     
  9. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    Jun 17, 2016

    I don't necessarily believe this is true. I think it's somewhat true with experience (that the tightness of the market matters less if you have some experience), but that doesn't always equate to quality of teacher.
     
  10. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Jun 17, 2016

    Wow. How did you find out it was a scam?
     
  11. TeachCafe

    TeachCafe Comrade

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    Jun 17, 2016

    Nowadays, I know people who take that first job to get at least one full year under their belt then they look better marketability wise.

    You just became a teacher. Student teaching is experience but unpaid and like an assistant. Lots of positions come last minute but IMO that added to my stress. I didn't have time to fully prepare at least my room. It was literally 5 days before school started. Would I do it all over again? Yes, but it was nerve wracking. MANY take the "not so desirable" schools for experience.
     
  12. EGrace

    EGrace Rookie

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    Jun 22, 2016

    I'm from St.Louis and have been wanting to move back and try to teach in the school district I went to school in, which I'm sure is impossible to get a job in haha. I guess that would not be a smart move if the market is so tight there as well.

    Right now I'm afraid that substitute teaching is in my future. With is terrifying due to horrible pay, lost time I could be gaining experience with my own classroom and of course the unknown factor of when I actually will get a teaching positions.

    I keep thinking, when would a principal would ever choose a new teacher over multiple experienced teachers who have proven results and are a sure bet. The only thing I came come up with is some experienced teachers may come off as already burnt out or jaded and not up to date on best practice.Ugh
     
  13. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Jun 22, 2016

    If you do end up subbing, don't look at it as lost time for experience. You're right that it doesn't pay as well -- you might need a second job or apply to sub in other local districts or schools. But it does provide really valuable experience. I subbed the year after I graduated because my student teaching was stressful and I didn't feel capable of having my own class, and wondered if I'd ever WANT to teach anyway. Subbing was great because I got to experience different schools, all grade levels and subjects (I even subbed middle school vocal music for a couple days, which was an interesting experience...) and I was able to work on classroom management strategies -- because if a sub can't manage behavior, they're really in trouble. It was pretty rare for me to be in the same class more than a couple times (with a few exceptions, obviously) so every day was new kids, new behaviors, and a new chance to practice. I wouldn't trade that experience or consider it wasted time, because now that I'm going into a teaching job I feel so much more prepared.
    And maybe I'm in the minority, but I LOVED subbing most days. I got to do the parts of teaching I love without the extra politics and drama. Plus at the end of the day, I went home and got to enjoy my evening without any stress. It was a steady enough job for me to save up some money, gain experience in areas of teaching I didn't feel as competent at, and make my rounds through the grades to see what I'd want to teach if I ever got into full time teaching.

    It's stressful and sometimes lonely (there would be some weeks where I didn't talk to another adult for days), but it's definitely not wasted time unless you let it be.

    (Edit: Also, I used my subbing experience in my interview as an example of self-development and awareness of areas of growth, and I think it may have been one of the things that made a good impression on the principal who hired me. So definitely see it as an opportunity to grow and gain experience.)
     
  14. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Jun 22, 2016

    I wish I was as positive as you are about substitute teaching. As most people have read, I hated it for a lot of reasons. That said, I think it made me a better teacher (I got summer school this year after being an "alternate" last year). I wanted to make the same kind of impact on kids that a few great teachers made on me, and I wonder if that was possible as a day-to-day substitute. I'm slowly getting less upset about it (why worry about what can't be changed now) and am trying to build back up the hope I had when I started student teaching.
     
  15. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    Jun 22, 2016

    I'm sorry that subbing wasn't a great experience for you, and I'm glad you've gotten into a more steady position! I definitely think it's possible to make an impact on kids even as a sub, you just don't always get to stick around to see it. But I subbed regularly at a couple schools and would be greeted by kids from all different grade levels, so I like to think I at least made a positive impression if not some kind of lasting impact. Sometimes subbing really does suck -- I had kids bolt from rooms, one kid punched another kid before the bell even rang at 8:00, I was screamed at and told I "wasn't a real teacher." And all of those things suck, but the good days kinda made up for it. Just hang on to the good moments and let go of the rest, and just focus on how you grew as a teacher in all of it. :)
     

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