New teacher here. How do you create tests?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by barry hills, Jun 3, 2016.

  1. barry hills

    barry hills New Member

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    Jun 3, 2016

    Do you get questions from textbooks, reuse/modify older test questions or just make them up from year to year? How do you store and share these? Do you reuse tests from a different educator? What tools (Word, PPT, Google docs) do you use to create them
     
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  3. ready2learn

    ready2learn Comrade

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    Jun 3, 2016

    Yes. Sometimes I use the questions that come from the textbook. Sometimes I get them from a question bank through programs my school has purchased. Sometimes I make up the questions myself. Sometimes I use a test another teacher makes. I store old tests on files on my computer, and keep the tests in files in my filing cabinet if I think I may reuse the test the following year. If I write the test myself, I use Word.
     
  4. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jun 3, 2016

    My go-to website for creating match up or fill in the blank tests is this one.
    The easiest thing to do is to use the tests that your teacher's edition includes. I've created many of my own tests, but usually the premade tests (when available) are better and far less work for me. You can pick and choose and modify as needed.

    When I want to assess things and it's not something that's tested with the textbook curriculum, I usually copy and paste from online worksheets, or just find a good worksheet that I can use as the test.
     
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  5. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    Jun 4, 2016

    Whatever you do, make sure you know what you're testing/assessing them on first. You shouldn't spend a week teaching something then just pull a random test from the textbook materials or something you find online and give it to them. That test may not align with what you focused on during the unit.
    So once you know what you'll be teaching (units, whatever), either find a good test that covers the skills and material you want them to master in that unit, or create one yourself, and then work backwards from that to create your lessons.
     
  6. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jun 4, 2016

    Absolutely this! The best unit designs are ones that start with the end goals first, then the evidence of student learning (including summative tests), and then the actual lessons to support the goal.
     
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  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jun 4, 2016

    Sounds very much like the answer I would give. The best part of this information is to make sure that you save the test you created on your computer, or digital files. I avoid Google Drive for this task unless it is a private account. When creating the exams, save often during the process. If I create a complicated question that may have diagrams with it, I may go so far as to save the individual question. I personally store on DVD's, as thumb drives have been known to fail. If it is truly complicated, such as a midterm or final at the HS level, I may write it to two DVD's - one to store at school, one to keep at home. You only have to lose these kinds of things once to become extra careful. My time is valuable.
     
    2ndTimeAround and ready2learn like this.

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