New Sub question: how to cater for a special needs student?

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Epiphany, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. Epiphany

    Epiphany Rookie

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    Oct 7, 2011

    Hi All,
    I am a new teacher in Australia, and have been subbing for a local school (where I know the children!) but need to take up work in other schools.
    I'm only familiar with Australian schools, where we often have one or more children in the classroom with learning challenges, who unfortunately have little or no time funded for help with a Teacher's Aide.
    I'd really appreciate some tips on how to prepare material for different levels of ability in a class, when I won't have much (if any!) time or information in advance to allow me to prepare for specific individual needs.
    Many thanks!
     
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  3. Christina1213

    Christina1213 Rookie

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    Oct 7, 2011

    I noticed this is always an issue I face while subbing as well. I say always come prepared with work for different level students. Print a lot of worksheets for students who finish fast and are on a higher level. For the student with special needs, work with him one on one while the other students are working on something else. Print out easier worksheets for the special needs student and help him with it. This should make your subbing experience better!
     
  4. Vince

    Vince Rookie

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    Oct 11, 2011

    My district makes it absolutely clear to our teachers that they WILL leave sub plans and they WILL leave work for us to give the students. I would certainly hope that a teacher with special needs kids would leave you specific instructions.

    If your district doesn't require teachers to leave you things, then I would bring coloring pages, for the lowest levels, then math coloring pages for higher levels (where they add two numbers to determine the color).

    So I am curious, is that the norm for Australia? Is the sub expected to furnish materials for the entire class for the whole day?
     
  5. uncleal

    uncleal Rookie

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    Oct 23, 2011

    WOW. In the United States, if the IEP grants it, it is MANDATORY for a teacher's assistnat to be present in the classroom!
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 23, 2011

    In the US, we don't 'cater' to students. We do, however, find ways to meet students at a variety of learning levels...identified or not. You may want to do some reading on differentiated instruction. Look for Carol Tomlinson, a leader in the research on this.
     
  7. ally06

    ally06 Companion

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    Oct 23, 2011

    The OP actually said 'cater for' and I honestly fail to see the problem with that.

    To th OP: Chances are the teachers will leave you plans with necessary accommodations/modifications in them. I'm not sure if it is different in your area but all of the teachers I know leave full plans unless it is an emergency situation.
    It is a good idea though to have some extra activities at different academic levels just in case. I know you can buy books at teacher stores that contain some ideas and activities, I have no idea of the name of any of them, sorry!
     
  8. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 23, 2011

    It may be a question of geography...the word cater...whether cater for, or cater to, doesn't have the best of connotations here in the US.:sorry: unless of course one is referring to a catered event with passed hors doevres, open bar and a fabulous dessert table!:D
     
  9. ally06

    ally06 Companion

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    Oct 23, 2011

    Just curious, what are the connotations with 'cater'?

    I can't speak for the OP but I imagine he/she is speaking about students who have some academic difficulties but do not qualify for an IEP. Even students with an IEP will usually only have aide support for part of the week.
    From what I have read on this forum it seems like IEPs are more common in the US than in my experience and there seems to be more teacher aides and students have access to them for more time each week (I am generalising though and only talking about my particular area and my overall impressions of the US system!)
     
  10. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 23, 2011

    Many definitions, but when used in reference to catering for/ to students, parents, it could connote 'pandering' or 'pampering'...giving into demands rather than meeting actual needs. Which, I'm absolutely sure,is NOT the OP's intention.:)
     
  11. ally06

    ally06 Companion

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    Oct 23, 2011

    Oh, I understand that - I thought it was going to have some big dark meaning! That is the connotation I would give to 'cater to' but to me 'cater for' is more of a 'meeting needs' phrase. That's why I questioned it initially because the OP's intent seemed pretty clear in the post.
     

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