New SH Teacher-Empty Classroom

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by rmpteach, Jul 10, 2008.

  1. rmpteach

    rmpteach Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2008

    This will be my first year teaching a SH class. I am so excited and a little nervous. I checked out the classroom the other day and there is basically nothing in it. Bunches of old handouts for english and math. It is bare in there. I do have windows:) I will be teaching at the high school level. The students are SH-higher functioning. The classroom looks like a traditional regular ed classroom. Individual desks, white board, etc...

    So, I have been told to give the VP and the Special Ed Dept a list of wants for the classroom. I have no clue where to begin. I did pick up some basic stuff like pencils, crayons, paper, calendars that I will be using as posters, and markers. I am dirt poor right now, so I do not have a lot of funds available.

    I will be teaching functional math, english,life skills, and careers. I am not even sure what type of curriculum I will be using. I have been in contact with the Special Ed. department, so I know they will hopefully let me know quickly what type of program I will be teaching. Everyone is on vacation at the moment.

    Any advice on what I should ask for and what I should keep an eye out for?
     
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  3. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Jul 10, 2008

    We don't use the acronym SH in our district. Could you let me know what it stands for?

    You should probably ask for math manipulatives to go with your textbook and calculators. Browse Scholastic and PCI Education to see what you think you need.
     
  4. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Jul 10, 2008

    I would ask for some:
    - math manipulatives
    - little whiteboards and dry eraser marker and whiteboard erasers
    - life skills resources/books (maybe some play money too)

    * look through the teaching resources you will get and get some suplemental resources (including computer programs)
     
  5. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Jul 10, 2008

    Oh I agree about the whiteboards!
     
  6. rmpteach

    rmpteach Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2008

    Thanks so much for the input. I have a bunch of small whiteboards that the students can use and a bunch of markers.

    Sorry...SH stands for severe handicap.
     
  7. Dthig65

    Dthig65 Rookie

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    Jul 10, 2008

    I use "talking" calculators in my room. They are especially helpful with students and the volume can be adjusted or simply turned off. I also used them to play math games with some of students trying to learn their numbers. Since they "speak" they kids can use them to self-correct.

    I also love using the individual whiteboard w/erasers. The kids love writing on them.
     
  8. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Jul 11, 2008

    rpmteach

    I am also a special education teacher in CA (moderate-severe). I have experience with working with high school severe-profound students with multiple disabilities. I also have experience working with students with autism (10-13 years) old as well. I would start with looking into the IEP's of each individual student and design a classroom structure from that standpoint. If you have ANY autistic spectrum disorders in your room, your room will need serious structuring. Are you going to be teaching "functional life skills" or using the SEACO Curriculum. Also, do you work for a district or the "county program" like I do as well. You will need to be a "team player" with your educational assistants but let them know that you have to make the final decision as well. Functional Life Skills include areas such as: community based instruction, recreation/leisure skills, vocational skills (work related), adapted physical education (A.P.E.), Daily Living (anything related to independent functional living), and Functional Academics (all academic areas which relate to "real life" skills). Before you start spending money, find out what you need for the classroom. You may have to "construct" some of the activities for your students depending on what skills they are being taught. Age-appropriateness is very DIFFICULT for high school teachers who work with severe-profound level students. Change any "circle-time" activities to "Calendar review, current events" You may have to do toileting with your students as well. Some students will learn how to do cooking depending on their functional level. Be "REALISTIC" about their functional level. If they are functioning lower than 24 months, do not allow them to do anything without being supervised at all times. You will want to document what occurs during the day, progress, ect. Here is a rule of thumb from me, PUT ALL PAPERWORK into binders and you'll have super-quick access to what you need. Put all of your worksheet masters and related activities into binders too. I have put everything paperwork into binders and I love it! If you want ideas on how to work with these students, I may be able to offer some suggestions.

    Aspieteacher
     

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